The One Hundred Texts - Text Set 1 - 2017 Version.
Swanny's
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The One Hundred Texts

Bible studies for an understanding of Reformation Christianity
Text Set 1 -
Questions and Answers


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The Text Study Index.
Text Set 1 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 2 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 3 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 4 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 5 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 6 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 7 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 8 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 9 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 10 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10



THE ONE HUNDRED TEXTS OF THE SOCIETY FOR IRISH CHURCH MISSIONS.

THE FIRST TEN

ROMANS 3., 23.

For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;




For all have sinned, and fall short of the glory of God; - R.V.

For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, - N.K.J.V.

For all have sinned, and fall short of the glory of God; - E.S.V.

FIRST TEN - TEXT 1.

I. - The Conclusion of an Argument.
  1. Why does this verse begin with the word "for" ?
    To direct our attention to what goes before.
  2. What statement goes before this text?
    The statement that " there is no difference."
  3. With what object does the Apostle introduce the statement that there is no difference?
    With the object of showing that all must obtain the righteousness of God "without the law."
  4. What is meant by the words " without the law "?
    Apart from the law, that is, by other means than that which the law offers.
  5. Why is righteousness not obtainable by the law?
    Because all have sinned; and by the law is the knowledge of sin.
  6. What, then, is the Apostle's conclusion?
    All have sinned and therefore all must receive God's righteousness by some other way than their own merits.
II. - An Important Truth.
  1. How does the Apostle describe man's condition?
    "All have sinned, and come short of the Glory of God."
  2. What is sin?
    Sin is any want of conformity unto, or transgression of, the law of God.
  3. How many, does the Apostle say, have sinned?
    "All have sinned."
  4. What important truth does this teach us?
    That all mankind are separated from God and cannot by their own efforts merit salvation.
III. - A Painful Result.
  1. What does the Apostle say is the effect of this sinful state?
    All come short of the glory of God.
  2. What is meant by "come short of"?
    To fail to attain.
  3. What is meant by "the glory of God"?
    It here means God's holiness and its requirements.
  4. Does the glory of God ever mean anything else?
    It means God's praise or approbation
    (John xii., 43).
  5. In what sense can it mean God's praise here?
    Losing the holiness God requires, we cease to be acceptable to Him and are condemned instead of praised, unless He bestows His grace
    (Romans, v., 2).
IV, - A Universal Condemnation.
  1. How many have sinned?
    All have sinned.
  2. Is there any exception to this rule?
    There is only one exception, our Lord Jesus Christ.
  3. How do we know that our Lord Jesus Christ is an exception?
    We are plainly told so in God's Word.
  4. Where does the Apostle Paul tell us that our Lord Jesus Christ never sinned?
    In
    2 Corinthians v., 21.
  5. With what sad fact does Paul connect this truth of universal sin? With the fact that Adam broke God's law.
  6. What does the connection with Adam's sin teach us?
    That all who are born of Adam are sharers in his sin.
  7. What is this sin called?
    Original sin.

V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What dogma of the Church of Rome does this teaching condemn?
    The Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
  2. What is meant by the Immaculate Conception of the B.V.M.?
    That Mary, the mother of Jesus, was conceived and born without spot or stain of original sin.
  3. When and by whom was this dogma decreed?
    Pope Pius IX., December 8th, 1854
  4. Why do we reject this dogma?
    Because Paul tells us "there is no difference: for all have sinned and come short of the Glory of God."


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JOHN 14., 6.

Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.



Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, and the truth, and the life: no one cometh unto the Father, but by me. - R.V.

Jesus said to him, "I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me." - N.K.J.V.

Jesus said to him, "I am the way,and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." - E.S.V.

FIRST TEN - TEXT 2.

I. The Character of Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  1. By whom were these words spoken?
    By our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. To whom were they spoken?
    To Thomas.
  3. Why was Thomas addressed?
    Because he had said, " Lord, we know not whither Thou goest, and how can we know the way? "
  4. How many titles does our Lord Jesus Christ give to Himself in this text?
    Three: The Way, the Truth, and the Life.
  5. What do we understand by a way?
    A means of approach.
  6. To whom is our Lord Jesus Christ the Way?
    God the Father.
  7. To what place is our Lord Jesus Christ the Way?
    To heaven.
  8. By what special act did our Lord Jesus make Himself the Way to God?
    By shedding His blood for sinners
    (Hebrews x,, 19, 20).
  9. What is the second title that our Lord Jesus Christ gives Himself?
    The Truth.
  10. What meant by saying that our Lord Jesus Christ is the Truth?
    That He reveals the way of God perfectly.
  11. Why do we speak of our Lord Jesus Christ as the Truth?
    Because He alone fully knows God.
    (John iii., 13)
II. - The Exclusive Claim of Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  1. What is the last title?
    The Life.
  2. What is meant by saying our Lord Jesus Christ is the Life?
    That He is the Author and Giver of Life.
  3. Where else does our Lord speak of Himself as "the Life" ?
    John xi, 25.
  4. What kind of life does our Lord give to those who trust in Him?
    Everlasting Life.
  5. What is meant by "Life" ?
    That kind of being which God intends those to have who know and love Him (see
    John xvii., 3. and the Second Collect at Morning Prayer " in knowledge of whom," etc.).
  6. Repeat the text again. John xiv., 6.
  7. What do the words "I am " teach us?
    That approach to God is through a Living Person, our Lord Jesus Christ.
  8. How does our Lord teach us that He alone is the Way, the Truth, and the Life?
    By adding " no man cometh unto the Father but by Me."
  9. What is meant by " cometh " ?
    Approach for blessing.
    III. - The Manner of Receiving Blessing,
  10. To whom are we to come?
    The Father.
  11. What is meant by " cometh .... by Me " ?
    Only through our Lord Jesus Christ can we approach God.
  12. What is meant by coming to God through our Lord Jesus Christ?
    Seeking God's peace and mercy only on the ground of what our Lord Jesus Christ has done for us.
  13. What name is given to God in this text?
    The Father.
  14. In what two senses may God be said to be our Father?
    Father by creation and Father by redemption.
  15. How do we come to know God as our Father by redemption?
    By receiving or welcoming the Lord Jesus Christ .
    {John i., 12)
  16. When we come to God in Christ Jesus how are we sure, we are made His Children?
    Because He has promised to give us in this way "the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry,
    'Abba, Father'"
    (Romans viii., 15).
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. Whom does the Church of Rome call our Life?
    The Blessed Virgin Mary (Mary, the mother of Jesus).
  2. Where is Mary, the mother of Jesus called our Life?
    In the Salve Regina.
  3. What is the Salve Regina?
    A prayer to Mary, the mother of Jesus, taught ro every Roman Catholic child.
  4. How is Mary, the mother of Jesus described in it?
    As "Holy Queen, our Life, our Sweetness, and our Hope."
  5. Why do we think it wrong to use such a prayer?
    John xiv., 6.
  6. How do these words forbid us addressing Mary, the mother of Jesus as " our Life" etc?
    By teaching us that our Lord Jesus Christ is the Life, that He is the only source and sustainer of life.
  7. When our Lord said, "I am the Way ... . the Life." unto what power did He lay claim?
    Our Lord laid claim to Divine power.
  8. If, then, we call any human being our Life, what sin do we commit?
    The sin of giving Divine Power to a human being
    (John i., 9;
    )
    The true Light which lighteneth every man was coming into the world in the Person of our Lord).
  9. What condition of salvation is laid down in this text?
    We must come to God through our Lord Jesus Christ.
  10. What condition of salvation does the Church of Rome add to this?
    That everyone must be connected with the Pope of Rome.
  11. How does this addition contradict the text?
    It places salvation in a Church and not in a Person.
  12. What incident in the Gospels shows us that this idea is a wrong one?
    The story of the man casting out devils who followed not with the Apostles.
  13. What did our Lord say of him?
    Mark ix., 39.


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MATTHEW 11., 28, 29, 30.

Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.
Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.




Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.
Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.
For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. - R.V.

"Come to Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.
Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.
For My yoke is easy and My burden is light." - N.K.J.V.

"Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.
Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.
For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light." - E.S.V.

FIRST TEN - TEXT 3.

I. - The Inviter.
  1. Who spoke these words?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. What had He said of Himself just before?
    That He knew God the Father, and He alone could reveal the Father to men.
  3. What is meant by the words, " To whomsoever the Son will reveal Him"?
    That we can only come to know God truly through our Lord Jesus Christ.
  4. What does this teach about our Lord Jesus Christ?
    That He and the Father are One.
  5. What does this teach us about the invitation, "Come unto Me"?
    That our Lord invites us to Himself as true God as well as true man.
  6. What claim does our Lord make in these texts?
    The claim to satisfy all who come.
  7. What reason does He give to show that His claim is a true one?
    The fact that all things are delivered unto Him of the Father See verse 27.
  8. What confidence have we in listening to this invitation?
    The confidence that it comes from One who has all power.
  9. Why would no one else be justified in issuing such an invitation?
    Because no one hut God can satisfy all our needs.
II. - The Invitation.
  1. What is the invitation our Lord gives?
    " Come unto Me."
  2. What kind of people are invited?
    " All that labour and are heavy-laden,"
  3. What comfort does that bring to men?
    It tells them the kind of people to whom our Lord Jesus Christ is willing to reveal the Father.
  4. What text have we learned that gives us the reason why people labour and are heavy-laden?
    Romans iii., 23.
  5. What text have we learned that teaches us that only Jesus can lift the burden?
    (John xiv., 6.)
  6. What is meant by the word "Come"?
    To follow Him
    (Matthew iv., 19), to believe on Him (John ix., 35), and to look to Him (John iii., 14, 15).
  7. To whom are we to come?
    To our Lord Jesus Christ.
  8. Why is it necessary lo come to Him?
    Because He alone can give us rest.
  9. What does our Lord promise to those who come to Him?
    " I will give you rest."
  10. What rest does our Lord offer?
    Rest of soul.
III. - The Invited.
  1. Who are the people who need rest?
    Those who labour and are heavy-laden."
  2. What is meant by those who labour?
    Those who feel the burden and seek to get rid of it.
  3. What is meant by those who "are heavy-laden"?
    Those on whom the weight of sin presses as a load.
  4. How does our Lord say we can get rid of our labour?
    By taking His yoke upon us
  5. How does our Lord say we get rid of our heavy load?
    By learning of Him.
  6. What does this teach us about the rest He gives?
    That it is not idleness but joyful service that brings rest.
  7. Concerning what two qualities does our Lord invite us to learn?
    Meekness and lowliness.
  8. How did our Lord teach us meekness?
    "When He was reviled, He reviled not again."
    (l Peter ii., 23.)
  9. How did He teach us lowliness?
    He emptied Himself of His glory and took our nature.
    {Philippians ii., 7.)
  10. What is meant by " take My yoke upon you "?
    Enter into My service
    (1 Kings xii., 9-11; Jeremiah ii., 20; Psalms ii., 3).
  11. What is a yoke?
    The piece of wood laid upon the neck of oxen.
  12. How do we learn of our Lord Jesus Christ?
    By following His example and heeding His teaching.
IV. - The Result of Acceptance.
  1. What does our Lord promise to those who labour and are heavy-laden?
    " I will give you rest."
  2. How does our Lord give us this rest?
    By bidding us cease from struggling and by lifting our burden.
  3. When do we begin to struggle because of sin?
    When God shows us our wickedness in His sight.
  4. When do we feel the burden of our sin?
    When God's warnings reach our hearts.
  5. What is this experience called?
    Conviction of sin.
  6. Who are they, then, who respond to His invitation?
    Those whose hearts have been opened by God the Holy Spirit.
  7. When may we hope to receive this gift of "rest"?
    When we are really weary of sin and long to be delivered.
  8. When the burden is lifted, what " rest" do we receive?
    The rest of pardon and acceptance with God.
  9. What is this condition called?
    The state of justification.
  10. What are we invited to do?
    To take servce with our Lord Jesus Christ.
  11. What is the difference between the burden of service and the burden of sin?
    The burden of servce is light, the burden of sin is heavy.
  12. What kind of " rest" do we find in service?
    The freedom which comes from doing God's will.
  13. What is this condition called?
    The state of sanctification.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. To whom should we go for rest for our souls?
    To our Lord Jesus Christ
  2. To whom does the Church of Rome send us?
    To the priest in the confessional.
  3. How do you show that we need not go to the priest?
    Our Lord says, " Come unto Me, and I will give you rest."
  4. What do these words teach us?
    That pardon comes directly from our Lord Jesus Christ.


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JOHN 3., 16.

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever
believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.




For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever
believeth on him should not perish, but have eternal life. - R.V.

For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever
believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. - N.K.J.V.

"For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever
believes in him should not perish but have eternal life." - E.S.V.

FIRST TEN - TEXT 4.

    I - The Revelation of God's Love,
  1. Why does the text begin with the word "for"?
    To direct our attention to what goes before.
  2. What statement goes before this text?
    The statement that the Son of Man would be lifted up, that whoso- ever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.
  3. With what object did our Lord introduce these words?
    With the object of explaining the manner of the working of the Holy Spirit in the new birth.
  4. What are we to learn from this fact?
    That the blessing of the new birth comes to us because of the work of our Lord Jesus Christ for us.
  5. How does the text connect the work of our Lord Jesus Christ with God the Father?
    It tells us it was undertaken because God loved the world.
  6. What is meant by " the world"?
    The inhabited earth, all the race of men.
  7. What is the attitude of God to this earth?
    He loves it.
  8. What is meant by saying "God loved the world"?
    That God looks with mercy and kindness on all whom He has created.
  9. What lesson does this teach us?
    That it is a great mistake to dread God or look upon Him as a vengeful Being.
  10. What confidence have we in believing this great message of God's love?
    It has been brought to us by God's own Son, Who knew what was in God.
II. - The Gift of God's Love.
  1. What proof did God give the world of His great love?
    He gave His only begotten Son.
  2. How does that show the nature of God's love?
    By teaching us that God did not spare His best gift, when purposing to save the world.
  3. How does the text draw special attention to that fact?
    By introducing the little word " so."
  4. To what does the word " so" draw special attention?
    To the manner of God's love, the depth and character of it.
  5. How is our Lord Jesus Christ described in the text?
    As God's only begotten Son.
  6. How is the word "only-begotten" used in the New Testament?
    It is always used to describe an only child
    (Luke vii., 12, viii., 42,ix., 38; Hebrews xi., 17). (The word "only-begotten" appears in English of these texts only in Hebrews xi., 17.)
  7. What does this teach us about our Lord Jesus Christ?
    That He is in a very special sense the Son of God.
  8. What is the special character that makes our Lord Jesus Christ the only begotten Son of God?
    The fact that He is truly one with God the Father and equally Divine.
  9. Why is it necessary for us always to remember this great fact when speaking of God's love?
    Because it is only when we remember that, our Lord is truly God that we can understand fully God's great love in giving His own Son.
  10. What does the fact that it was necessary for God to give His only Son teach us?
    That none but God could save the world.
III. - The Object of the Gift.
  1. What does the text teach us is the object of God's great gift?
    To save whosoever believeth from perishing.
  2. What does this teach us about the state of the world?
    That the world is in a lost state.
  3. What text had we before that tells us this also?
    Romans iii., 23. (Text 1-1.)
  4. What is meant by the word "perish"?
    It means to be destroyed or brought to nothing.
  5. What is it that causes the world to perish?
    The fact that sin cuts off from the life of God.
  6. How do we escape this danger of perishing?
    By believing in the Lord Jesus Christ.
  7. What does this teach us about God's great love?
    That its object is accomplished in those who believe.
  8. What is meant by " believeth " ?
    Place our reliance in.
  9. How does the text show that the blessing is for all who believe?
    By putting in the word " whosoever."
  10. What does the word " whosoever " mean?
    You or I, or anybody else.
  11. What blessing results from believing?
    We get everlasting life!
  12. What is meant by " everlasting life"?
    Life for ever in the presence of God, enjoying everything that makes existence worth having.
  13. When do we get everlasting life?
    When we believe.
  14. What is the final blessing in this everlasting life?
    The resurrection of our bodies when we are completely redeemed and made fit to live with God for all eternity.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What condition does the text lay down for obtaining everlasting life?
    Faith on our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. How does it show that this is the only condition?
    It states distinctly that " whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life."
  3. What condition does the Church of Rome add to that in the text?
    The necessity of being united to the Sovereign Pontiff.
  4. Who is the Sovereign Pontiff?
    The Bishop of Rome for the time being, called the Pope.
  5. Where do we find the condition laid down? In the Bull, " Unam Sanctam." (See p. 8.)
  6. What is meant by a Bull?
    A decree issued by the Pope and claimed to be binding on Christians.
  7. What does the Bull, " Unam Sanctam," say?
    " We declare, affirm, define, and pronounce it to be necessary to salvation for every human creature to be subject to the Roman Pontiff."
  8. How is this teaching put in the ordinary catechisms of the Church of Rome?
    Usually in the statement that outside the Church there is no salvation.
  9. In what sense is this true?
    In the sense that the Church consists only of believers in our Lord Jesus Christ.
  10. What does the Roman Catechism mean by the Church?
    The Church of Rome.
  11. How do we show that this teaching is false?
    By pointing out that " God so loved the world."



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1 JOHN 1., 7.

But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin.




But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin. - R.V.

But if we walk in the light as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus Christ His Son cleanses us from all sin. - N.K.J.V.

But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin. - E.S.V.

FIRST TEN - TEXT 5.

I. - A Condition Imposed.
  1. Why does this text begin with "but"?
    To direct our attention to a contrast indicated by the Apostle.
  2. What is the contrast here indicated?
    The contrast between walking in darkness and in the light.
  3. What is meant by walking in the darkness or in the light?
    Living under the control of error or of truth.
  4. To what, then, does walking refer?
    To our daily words and actions which are controlled by the spirit of our minds.
  5. To whom does the apostle John refer when he says "If we walk"?
    To himself and the early teachers of the word of God.
  6. Against what does he warn his readers?
    Against the idea that anyone who is evil is in fellowship with God.
  7. What great lesson does this teach us?
    That our lives should be such as to prove that we are real followers of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  8. Why was John so anxious to teach this truth?
    Because certain people in his time were teaching that evil as well as good has its source in God.
  9. How did John correct this false idea?
    By teaching, " God is light and in Him is no darkness at all " (verse 5).
  10. What does he lay down as the condition of all blessing?
    To " walk in the light as He is in the light."
  11. What great blessing results from walking in the light?
    We have fellowship one with the other.
II. - An Experience Realised.
  1. What is meant by "fellowship" ?
    It means union in mind and heart through sharing the same character and blessing.
  2. In order to obtain this fellowship what must we do?
    " Walk in the light."
  3. What guide have we in our efforts to " walk in the light"?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  4. What are we told concerning God?
    That " He is in the Light."
  5. What is meant by saying that God is " in the light" ?
    That absolute purity is the condition of His Being.
  6. What do the words " walk in the light as He is in the light," taken together, teach us?
    That what God the Father and our Lord Jesus Christ are in nature we daily approach unto by seeking to follow this guidance.
  7. With whom have we fellowship?
    " One with another."
  8. What is meant by saying we have fellowship " one with another"?
    It means that as Christians draw near to God, they get more and more united to one another and to Him.
  9. Why is it impossible to have fellowship with God and walk in darkness?
    Because fellowship means the sharing of a common life, and there is no darkness in God.
  10. What, then, is the real condition of happy communion both with God and our fellow-Christians?
    A life in which the light of God guides our steps.
  11. How then, can we best secure the spirit of love and fellowship?
    By a life of continual and true holiness which may most justly be called a walking in the light.
III. - A Promise Given.
  1. How may we sum up John's message?
    It teaches us that what God the Father and our Lord Jesus Christ are, by daily effort we should seek to become.
  2. What does John add in the text?
    " And the blood of Jesus Christ His Son cleanseth us from all sin."
  3. What does this teach us
    That even when walking in the light we still require the cleansing blood.
  4. What encouragement is given us by this promise?
    When we feel our imperfections we know God has provided a remedy.
  5. What is the remedy which God has provided?
    "The blood of Jesus Christ His Son."
  6. What is meant by " the blood of Jesus Christ"?
    His blood shed for sinners, His sacrificial death.
  7. What does Jolm tell us this blood does for us?
    It cleanseth us from all sin.
  8. What tense is " cleanseth"?
    Present progressive, i.e., it keeps on cleansing.
  9. What is meant by saying that our Lord's blood "keeps on cleansing " ?
    It means that every moment the death of our Lord Jesus Christ is available for us and meets our need before God.
  10. What lesson does this teach us?
    That our acceptance with God is always because of what our Lord has done, not because of what we are doing.
  11. What does "cleanse" mean?
    To free from defilement or guilt.
  12. What text teaches us that all need cleansing?
    Romans iii., 23. (Text 1-1.)
  13. How does our text (1 John i., 7) meet that need?
    By teaching that all sin is cleansed.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. How is the completeness of our Lord's cleansing emphasised?
    It is said the blood "cleanseth us from all sin."
  2. What words does John put in that show to us the reason of this wonderful power?
    He tells us it is the blood of God's Son.
  3. What can we learn from this?
    That our Lord Jesus Christ's sacrifice is complete and fully sufficient.
  4. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning sin after baptism?
    That part of the penalty has to be borne by the sinner.
  5. What part of the penalty?
    The temporal part.
  6. What is meant by the temporal part?
    A portion that can be atoned for in time and is not punished with eternal death.
  7. How is this part atoned for?
    By goodness, penance, and the fire of purgatory.
  8. In what two ways does the text contradict this teaching?
    (1) It shows that even when walking in the light we still require the sacrifice of Christ to render us acceptable.
    (2) It teaches that His blood cleanses from all sin.


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1 TIMOTHY 2., 5, 6.

For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus;
Who gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time.




For there is one God, one mediator also between God and men, himself man, Christ Jesus,
Who gave himself a ransom for all; the testimony to be borne in its own time; - R.V.

For there is one God and one Mediator between God and men, the Man Christ Jesus,
who gave Himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time, - N.K.J.V.

For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus,
who gave himself as a ransom for all, which is the testimony given at the proper time. - E.S.V.

FIRST TEN. - TEXT 6.

I. - A Vital Truth.
  1. Why does this text begin with " for" ?
    To give a reason for what goes before.
  2. What has been stated before?
    That God will have all men to be saved and to come unto the knowledge of the truth.
  3. What is God called in the text immediately before the one just quoted?
    God, our Saviour
    (verse 3).
  4. What is meant by a Saviour
    One who heals or delivers.
  5. What great truth do we learn from these two texts?
    That God wishes to heal and deliver all men.
  6. What led the apostle Paul to state that God wishes to heal and deliver all men?
    Paul was encouraging men to offer up petitions for everybody.
  7. How, in particular, does he show that such proceedings are right?
    He says they are acceptable to God because He, as Saviour, wills all men to come to the knowledge of the truth.
  8. How does the text we are learning help to enforce this lesson?
    It teaches that God is one and that He has appointed one Mediator.
  9. How does the truth that there is one God help us to understand that He wills all men to be saved?
    It contradicts the old heathen idea of separate gods for separate nations or classes of men.
  10. What Old Testament passage shows the idea of many gods hinders the idea that salvation is offered to all without distinction?
    1 Kings xx., 23, 28.
II. - A Special Connection.
  1. How did God show His willingness that alt men should be saved?
    By appointing a Mediator.
  2. How many Mediators are there?
    There is but one Mediator.
  3. What is meant by the word "Mediator" ?
    One who goes between two parties to make peace.
  4. Between what two parties does the Mediator go?
    Between God and men.
  5. Who is the Mediator?
    The Man, Christ Jesus.
  6. What is the revised version reading for " The Man " ?
    " Himself Man".
  7. What does the text tell us about our Lord Jesus Christ?
    That He was a Mediator and was Himself Man and gave Himself a ransom.
  8. Why are the words "The Man, Christ Jesus," put into the text?
    To show that the Mediator must be truly one with us.
  9. What connection have these words with the fact that there is one Mediator?
    They teach that all humanity is summed up in our Lord Jesus Christ.
  10. What great truth does this teach us?
    That God can only deal with men through our Lord Jesus Christ, but also that He can deal with all men through Him.
  11. Why do we need a Mediator?
    Because we have broken God's law.
  12. What text have we learned that teaches us that all need a Mediator for that reason?
    Romans iii., 23. (First Ten - Text 1.)
  13. What text teaches us that it was God's love which provided the Mediator?
    John iii., 16. (First Ten - Text 4.)
III. - A Divine Offering.
  1. What work did our Lord perform as Mediator?
    He gave Himself a ransom for all.
  2. What is the meaning of the word " ransom " ?
    A price paid to redeem or buy back a captive.
  3. What is meant by saying our Lord Jesus Christ gave Himself a ransom for all?
    That He offered up His life to God on behalf of all men.
  4. From what did our Lord Jesus Christ ransom us?
    From the curse of the law
    Galatians iii., 13).
  5. How did our Lord Jesus Christ ransom us?
    By taking the curse due to us upon Himself.
  6. Why could we not ransom ourselves?
    Because we have nothing to give in exchange for our souls (See
    Matthew xvi., 26).
  7. What does this teach us concerning the Mediator?
    That the Mediator must be able to offer a sacrifice and stand in His own merit before God.
  8. What three things therefore are necessary for a Mediator?
    He must be equal with God, one with men, and able to offer a sacrifice that puts away sin.
  9. How many can satisfy this test?
    Only one, our Lord Jesus Christ.
  10. How does our text emphasise that?
    By telling us there is One Mediator also (R.V.), which means no more than one.
IV. - A Clear Testimony.
  1. What does the text add concerning this message?
    It is "to be testified in due time".
  2. What is meant by " to be testified in due time " ?
    It means that God had provided a proper time for the declaration of the truth that our Lord Jesus Christ is the Mediator Who gave Himself a ransom for all.
  3. When did that time come?
    When God appointed preachers and Apostles to declare this great truth.
  4. In what fact does Paul see a fulfilment of this purpose of God?
    In the fact that he became a teacher of the Gentiles.
  5. How did that show that the fulness of time had come?
    By removing the restrictions of God's truth to one people and making it world-wide.
  6. What is the great means of testimony?
    The preaching of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  7. What is the R.V. for, " to be testified in due time"?
    " The testimony to be borne in its own times".
  8. What, then, is the teaching of our text?
    That as there is only one God, so also there is only one Mediator, our Lord Jesus Christ.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What error is condemned by this text?
    The error of seeking for other mediators to plead our cause before God.
  2. Whom does the Church of Rome regard as mediators?
    The saints reigning with Christ and especially Mary, the mother of Jesus.
  3. Why do we not regard the Saints and Mary, the mother of Jesus as mediators?
    " For there is one God and one Mediator between God and men".
  4. How does the Church, of Rome try to explain away this text?
    The note in the Rhemish Testament says: "Christ is the one and only Mediator of redemption.....But this is not against our seeking the prayers and intercession as well of the faithful upon earth, as of the Saints and Angels in heaven, for obtaining mercy, grace, and salvation through Jesus Christ, and Paul himself often desired the help of the prayers of the faithful, without any injury to the Mediatorship of Jesus Christ".
  5. How do you answer this note?
    By distinguishing between mediation and supplication.
  6. What is mediation?
    An appeal to God on the ground of the merits and works of a mediator.
  7. What is supplication?
    An appeal to God's mercy without any claim to merit.
  8. What gives us confidence that our supplications are heard?
    The fact that our Mediator presents them to God for us.
  9. How would you show that the Church of Rome makes Saints mediators and not supplicants?
    She encourages her people to pray to them to intercede by their merits with God.
  10. Why do we believe we can invite the supplications of men on earth and not of those in heaven?
    Because
    (1) the Bible encourages one form of supplication and not another;
    (2) Supplication of Saints in heaven requires prayer to them and prayer should be made to God only;
    (3) We have no ground for thinking that the Saints hear our prayer.


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Gospel of LUKE 11., 13.

If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to them that ask him ?




If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children, how much more shall your heavenly
Father give the Holy Spirit to them that ask him? - R.V.

"If you then, being evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your heavenly
Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask Him!" - N.K.J.V.

"If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly
Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!" - E.S.V.

FIRST TEN - TEXT 7.

I. - A Moral Condition.
  1. Who" are referred to in the words, "If ye then being evil"?
    The disciples who had been taught to pray.
  2. Why is die word " then" put into the text?
    To show that what follows is an argument based on what went
  3. What went before our text?
    Examples of a father's willingness to give his children suitable food.
  4. Why were these examples given?
    To encourage us to ask, seek, and knock.
  5. What parable did our Lord give to show the value of persistent prayer?
    The parable of the friend at midnight.
  6. What lesson does that parable enforce?
    That importunity makes even the unwilling grant our desires.
  7. What do the illustrations of the father's answer to his son teach us?
    That a request is answered readily where there is a desire to help.
  8. And what does our text add to that?
    That our willingness to do good must be less than God's.
  9. Can you now build up the whole lesson that our Lord teaches us in these texts?
    Even if there be unwillingness, perseverance secures our requests, we know that often men wish to help and so answer readily, and God being good, is still more ready, therefore we have the strongest confidence in prayer to Him.
  10. What two kinds of return docs a father's love prevent his making?
    (1) A return of that which is useless, a stone for a loaf;
    (2) A return of that which is hurtful or bad, a serpent for a fish, or a scorpion for an egg.
  11. Why is a scorpion compared to an egg?
    Probably on account of its oval shape.
  12. What does our Lord say men know how to do?
    They know how to give good gifts to their children.
  13. What is meant by saying men " know" how to do this?
    Their own natural feelings prompt them to do the right things.
  14. What important truth is here taught us ?
    That natural affection is implanted by God.
  15. What is meant by "good gifts" ?
    Things that are suitable and necessary for children.
  16. What does our Lord here imply concerning the prayers of children?
    That they are answered according to the knowledge of their father.
  17. Why is the request for a loaf, or a fish, or an egg answered so readily?
    Because these things are known to be good by the parent.
  18. What limit does that put on prayers?
    It rules out the answering of foolish and unwise requests.
  19. What kind 'of prayers, then, does a kind father answer?
    Only prayers which, when granted, benefit his son.
  20. What is it that prompts such requests as we have considered, made by children of their parents?
    A sense of need.
  21. What two things must be combined to help us to get our true wants supplied?
    A feeling of need on one side and the knowledge of what is good for the son on the other side.
  22. What does the Saviour here teach us concerning this double condition?
    That God who gives a sense of need to children has given to parents a sense of what is fitting for these needs.
  23. Suppose that children asked for what was hurtful, what would you expect?
    That parents should know that such things should not be given.
II. - A Seeming I limitation.
  1. What does our Lord put in to show that this is not wholly the case?
    The words " being evil."
  2. What is meant by the words " being evil"?
    They mean that it belongs to our nature to think and do what is wrong.
  3. How do these words show the awful extent of sin?
    They were spoken of the kind and, as we would say, the good.
  4. How does the evil often show itself?
    In the fact that those who give earthly good things to their children are quite careless about heavenly good things for them.
  5. What does our Lord teach here as to the effect of evil?
    It hinders us from fully knowing what is good.
  6. How is this idea brought out more clearly?
    By the words " how much more."
  7. What is meant by saying " how much more " ?
    If we, blinded and stained by sin, yet know to some extent where the good of our children lies and therefore answer their prayers, God, Who is all good, must at once give that gift which will benefit those who ask.
III. - A Blessed Gift.
  1. What blessed gift does the Lord say our Father is willing to bestow?
    The Holy Spirit.
  2. How does the apostle Matthew report this saying of our Lord?
    He says that the Father will give good things to those who ask Him.
    (See Matthew vii., 11. )
  3. How would you show that Luke gives the same idea as Matthew?
    By showing that all good things are the fruit of the Holy Spirit.
  4. What was the constant prayer of the Rev. Alex. R, C. Dallas, the Founder of the Society for Irish Church Missions?
    " O God, for Christ's sake, give me the Holy Spirit."
  5. What confidence have we in praying this prayer?
    That God has promised the Holy Spirit to those that ask Him.
  6. What is meant by asking for the Holy Spirit?
    Not merely repeating a prayer but desiring in our hearts this blessed gift.
  7. Why is the " Spirit" called Holy?
    Because in His nature He is Holy and His work is to make us holy.
  8. In what condition therefore must we be if we really ask for the Spirit?
    In the condition of those who long for holiness of heart and life.
  9. What is it that prevents us longing for holiness?
    That fact that we are evil.
  10. What text teaches us that we are evil?
    Romans iii., 23.
  11. When, then, shall we really ask for this blessed gift of God?
    When God shows us our sins and makes us long to get rid of them.
  12. How does the gift of the Holy Spirit show that God knows what we need much better than any earthly parent?
    They know what is good for time, He gives what is good for eternity; they supply the needs of our lives, He cares for the needs of body and soul; they give for the outside, He supplies the power to renew us within.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does this verse teach us about prayer?
    That the one thing that we require in prayer is a true sense of our real need.
  2. What does the Church of Rome teach about prayer?
    She teaches that prayer is heard when we afflict ourselves and merit an answer.
  3. How does this idea do injury to the character of God?
    By teaching that He must be persuaded by our penances to answer our prayers.
  4. What does our text tell us?
    That God as a Father is willing to give us that for which we ask.
  5. What, then, should we bring to God in prayer?
    We should bring our needs and not our merits.
  6. What confidence have we that God will answer?
    The confidence that He knows what is good for us and has promised to supply it.
  7. If we were told that God could not be approached except by very holy people, how should we reply?
    " If ye then being evil," etc.
  8. What is it that causes a parent to give to a son?
    Not the son's goodness but the father's love.
  9. What is it that urges God to answer our prayers?
    The fact that He is good although we are evil.


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Gospel of JOHN 5., 39

Search the Scriptures; for in them ye think you have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.




Ye search the scriptures, because ye think that in them ye have eternal life; and these are they which bear
witness of me; - R.V.

You search the Scriptures, for in them you think you have eternal life; and these are they which testify of Me. - N.K.J.V.

You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear
witness about me, - E.S.V.

FIRST TEN - TEXT 8.

I. - An Investigation Either Enjoined or Indicated.
  1. Who spake these words?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. To whom were they spoken?
    To the Jews
    (verse 16).
  3. What had our Lord done to make the Jews angry?
    He had healed a man at the Pool of Bethesda on the Sabbath day.
  4. How did our Lord answer their objection?
    He said, " My Father worketh hitherto and I work. "
  5. What objection did the Jews make to this saying?
    That our Lord made Himself equal to God.
  6. What reply did our Lord make to this charge?
    He claimed to be one with God the Father, that God the Father had given Him all judgment and that He should be honoured.
  7. What witness did our Lord first produce for His claim to power and authority?
    The witness of John
    (verse 33.)
  8. What did our Lord say concerning John's testimony?
    He said, " I receive not testimony from man. "
  9. What is the meaning of the words " I receive not testimony from man " (verse 34)?
    That our Lord's claim and power do not rest on mere human witness which might be open to question.
  10. What other and greater witness did our Lord produce?
    The witness of His own works which God had given Him to do.
  11. Besides His works and the witness of John, to what other witness did our Lord lay claim?
    The witness of the Father Himself
    (verse 37).
  12. How did the Father bear witness to our Lord Jesus Christ?
    By His word.
  13. What charge did our Lord bring against the Jews?
    That they had not God's word abiding in them.
  14. How did He prove that charge?
    By pointing out that they refused to believe in Him whom God had sent.
  15. Where does our Lord say God's word is to be found?
    In the Scriptures.
  16. How do we know that our Lord intended us to understand that the Scriptures were really the Father's Word to men?
    He says the Father bears witness that His Word abides in those who believe in the Lord Jesus Christ, and that the Scriptures are they which bear witness of Him, therefore the Scriptures must be the Word of the Father which abides in believers.
  17. What is meant by the Scriptures?
    The writings in which the Jews possessed God's revelation.
  18. What does the use of the word "Scriptures" teach us concerning the word of God?
    It teaches us that God's word has been written for our learning.
  19. To what " Scriptures " does our Lord refer?
    To the Old Testament.
II. - The Reason Why the Search was Undertaken.
  1. What does He say concerning the Jews and the Old Testament?
    He says that the Jews searched the Scriptures.
  2. What does this fact show us?
    That it was regarded as a duty to read the Scriptures.
  3. If the Jews read the Scriptures what may we conclude?
    That the Scriptures were in their possession.
  4. With what object did the Jews search the Scriptures?
    With the object of obtaining eternal life.
  5. What is the meaning of the word " search " ?
    To examine diligently or minutely.
  6. . How would you show that our Lord commended diligent searching?
    Because previously He had spoken in the same way of the mission of John
    (verse 33), and later He speaks in the same way of Moses (verse 45).
  7. . What is meant by " in them ye think ye have eternal life " ?
    The Jews were content with the mere knowledge of Scripture and did not think anything more was necessary.
  8. What error does our Lord condemn in this saying?
    The error of imagining that it is enough to know God's word.
  9. What else is necessary besides a knowledge of God's word?
    A knowledge of God Himself as revealed in His word.
  10. What does this teach us concerning the Scriptures?
    They must be brought home to the heart by the Holy Spirit.
  11. What text gives us great comfort here?
    Luke xi., 13, by teaching that God gives the Holy Spirit to them that ask Him. (First Ten - Text 7, page 27.)
III. - The Testimony of the Scriptures to Christ.
  1. What does our Lord say concerning the witness of the Scriptures?
    " They testify of Me. "
  2. What is meant by the word " testify " ?
    To bear witness.
  3. What truth about the Old Testament does this give us?
    That the Person and Work of Christ are foreshadowed in it.
  4. How is the work of our Lord foreshadowed m the Old Testament?
    In prophecy and in type.
  5. Under what three aspects is His Person represented in the Old Testament?
    As Prophet, Priest, and King.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What note is given in the Rhemish Testament on John v. 39?
    " It is not a command for all to read, but a reproach to the Pharisees that, reading the Scriptures as they did, and thinking to find Eternal Life in them, they would not receive Him to whom all the Scriptures give testimony and through whom alone they could have that true life. "
  2. How do you answer this note?
    Our Lord appealed to the fact that they searched the Scriptures, this proves that it was the custom of the religious Jews. Our Lord does not condemn this use of the Scriptures, but blames the Jews because their searching had not a right end through their unwillingness of heart.
  3. How does the Church of Rome follow the sin of the Jews?
    She teaches people to rest in her sayings and not to seek Christ for themselves.
  4. How does this appear clearly?
    The Jews pretended to know the truth and our Lord said that very pretence was their undoing. The Church of Rome makes a similar claim to-day.
  5. What great lesson does our text teach us?
    To use the word of God but not to rest until it leads us to our Lord Jesus Christ.


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GOSPEL of MARK 10., 13, 14.

And they brought young children to him, that he should touch them: and his disciples rebuked those that brought them. But when Jesus saw it, he was much displeased, and said unto them, Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God.




And they brought unto him little children, that he should touch them: and the diciples rebuked them.
But when Jesus saw it, he was moved to indignation, and saith unto them, Suffer the little children to come unto me; forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God. - R.V.

Then they brought little children to Him, that He might touch them; but the disciples rebuked those who brought them.
But when Jesus saw it, He was greatly displeased and said to them, "Let the little children come to Me, and do not forbid them; for of such is the kingdom of God." - N.K.J.V.

And they were bringing children to him that he might touch them, and the disciples rebuked them.
But when Jesus saw it, he was indignant and said to them, "Let the children come to me; do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of God." - E.S.V.

FIRST TEN - TEXT 9.

I. - The Action of Those who Brought the Children.
  1. What kind of persons are here said to be brought to Jesus?
    Little children.
  2. How do we know that these little children were very small?
    The apostle Luke tells us that they were infants
    (Luke xviii., 15).
  3. What other fact shows us that they were very little children?
    The fact that our Lord Jesus Christ took them up in His arms to lay His hands upon them. " That He should touch them."
  4. With what object did they bring these little children to our Lord? " That He should touch them."
  5. Why did they want our Lord Jesus Christ to touch the children?
    They wanted our Lord to put His hands upon them and pray over them so that they would get blessing.
  6. Of what story concerning our Lord Himself does this remind us?
    Of the story of His presentation in the Temple and reception by Simeon
    (Luke ii., 22-28).
  7. What does this fact show us?
    That the Jews valued the prayers and blessings of good men, and sought to get them for their children
    (See Genesis xlviii., 14).
  8. What more did these children receive by being brought to Jesus than the prayers of a good man?
    They received blessing direct from the Lord's hand and not only a prayer that God would bless.
II. - The Action of the Disciples.
  1. Who sought to prevent the children from* being brought to our Lord?
    His Disciples.
  2. What is the meaning of disciple?
    A learner, one who follows the doctrine or teaching of another.
  3. Who are meant here by the words " the disciples" ?
    The twelve Apostles chosen by our Lord.
  4. Why were they called so often and so particularly " His Disciples " ?
    Because they were marked out as those who gave their whole time to following and listening to His teaching.
  5. What are we told His disciples did?
    They rebuked those who brought the young children.
  6. What is meant by rebuked?
    They found fault with them or blamed them for their action.
  7. Why did the disciples rebuke them?
    Because they thought that such young children should not be allowed to take up our Lord's time.
  8. What reason have we for thinking that was the thought in the minds of the disciples?
    Because our Lord said, " Suffer the little children to come unto Me, and forbid them not"
III. - The Rebuke of the Master.
  1. What are we told about our Lord Jesus in relation to the action of the disciples?
    When He saw it He was much displeased.
  2. What is the Revised Version for " much displeased " ?
    " Moved with indignation." It means that our Lord was displeased by, and resented the action of His disciples.
  3. In what words did our Lord show His indignation?
    " Suffer the little children," etc.
  4. What is meant by " suffer " ?
    Permit the children to come.
  5. What do we learn from this saying of our Lord?
    That He wishes us to bring even very young children to Him.
  6. In what service do we bring young children to our Lord Jesus Christ?
    In the service of Baptism.
  7. What do we say in that service concerning our Lord's willingness to receive the child?
    " Doubt ye not therefore, but earnestly believe, that he will likewise favourably receive this present Infant, that he will embrace him with the arms of his mercy; that he will give unto him eternal life, and make him partaker of his heavenly kingdom,"
  8. Why do some object to the baptism of very young children?
    Because they think they cannot understand what they are there pledged to perform.
  9. How does this text show us that such an idea is a mistake?
    Because our Lord was moved with indignation when a similar idea came into the minds of the disciples.
  10. What does God promise to His people's children in the Old Testament?
    God promises that He will be a Father not only to His people but to their seed, and that He will pour out His Spirit upon their offspring. (See page 60.)
  11. How does our Lord show us that this promise holds good under the Gospel?
    He said, " Suffer the little children."
  12. What, then, ought parents to do with their children?
    They ought to bring them in faith to our Lord Jesus Christ.
  13. What ought children to learn from this text?
    That having been brought to Jesus He will receive them and bless them.
IV. - His Teaching Concerning the Kingdom.
  1. What did our Lord add to the words " Suffer the little children," etc.?
    " For of such is the kingdom of God."
  2. What Is meant by saying " of such is the kingdom of God " ?
    That this kingdom of God consists of persons who resembled in condition these infants.
  3. How does our Lord Himself explain these words?
    By adding, " Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein."
  4. How did these words rebuke the thought of the disciples?
    They imagined that only grave and serious people could understand the Lord's message and would exclude children; the Lord teaches that it is the very helplessness of the child that we should feel if we are to receive blessing.
  5. What do these words teach us concerning very little children?
    They teach us that God includes them in His mercy.
  6. What is meant by "the kingdom of God"?
    Gods rule and reign over people on this earth.
  7. What does our Lord here teach concerning the Kingdom?
    That little children and such as are like little children are members of His Kingdom.
  8. What name is given to " the kingdom of God " in Matthew's Gospel?
    " The kingdom of Heaven."
  9. By what means does Matthew tell us the Kingdom of Heaven is established?
    By means of " the word of the kingdom "
    (Matthew xiii., 19).
  10. What is the result of this preaching of the Word?
    Men and women are variously influenced.
  11. What two classes of people are found within the Kingdom?
    The good and the bad
    (Matthew xiii., 47, 48).
  12. What is meant, then, by being in "the Kingdom of God" or "The Kingdom of Heaven"?
    Being under the influence of God's Word, or of truth.
  13. How do we become true children of the Kingdom?
    By receiving the good seed of God's Word in our heart.
  14. What are we then to understand by "of such is the kingdom of God "?
    That the children of believers are within the circle of God's influence, and that their childlike helplessness is an illustration of the true way by which the blessings of the Kingdom are received.
  15. What is the outward sign of God's Kingdom?
    Baptism.
  16. Why, then, do we baptise infants?
    Because our Lord said " of such is the kingdom of God."
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. Who showed the most love and sympathy with those who brought the children?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. What does this teach us?
    That no one understands us as well as our Lord Jesus Christ.
  3. What does the Church of Rome teach us concerning the Saints?
    She teaches that as they are nearer to us than our Lord, they are more likely to feel for us.
  4. Whether would the disciples or the Lord seem to be nearer in that sense to those who brought the children?
    The disciples might seem to be nearer being only men.
  5. Yet, who proved that He understood their hearts best?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  6. What, then, may we learn from this incident?
    That the best way to secure blessing is to go direct to our Lord Jesus Christ. Saints, even if they could hear us, might mistake us but He never fails those who come to Him.


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MATTHEW 4., 10.

Then saith Jesus unto him, Get thee hence, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve.




Then saith Jesus unto him, Get thee hence, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and
him only shalt thou serve. - R.V.

Then Jesus said to him, "Away with you, Satan! For it is written, 'You shall worship the Lord your God,
and Him only you shall serve.' " - N.K.J.V.

Then Jesus said to him, "Be gone, Satan! For it is written, "'You shall worship the Lord your God and
him only shall you serve.'" - E.S.V.

FIRST TEN - TEXT 10.

I. - The Rebuke.
  1. When did our Lord speak these words?
    When He was tempted in the wilderness.
  2. How many temptations do the Evangelists record?
    Three temptations.
  3. How do we know that our Lord suffered many temptations at this time?
    Mark tells us that our Lord was in the wilderness forty days tempted of Satan
    (Mark i., 13).
  4. Why are we given these three special temptations?
    To show us the nature of the temptations to which our Lord was subjected.
  5. Who, do you think, gave the disciples an account of the Temptation?
    It must have been our Lord Himself for no human being was with Him in the wilderness.
  6. Who else gives a record of the temptations besides Matthew?
    Luke
    (Luke iv., 1-13).
  7. What difference is there between Luke's account of this incident and that of Matthew?
    Luke omits " Get thee hence, Satan " (See R.V.), and puts the temptation to worship Satan in the second place and not in the third.
  8. What was the nature of the temptation to which our text is our Lord's reply ?
    The devil showed Him the kingdoms of the world and offered to give them to our Lord if He would fall down and worship him.
  9. How do we know that this temptation came to our Lord suddenly?
    Luke tells us that all these kingdoms were seen " in a moment of time."
  10. What does this fact of suddenness teach us?
    That we must watch against the impulse of the mind.
  11. When did this temptation come to our Lord?
    At the beginning of His special life work.
  12. What lesson does that teach us?
    That the devil is ever ready to use our lawful ambition for wrong ends.
  13. What special force had this temptation to our Lord?
    The devil proposed to give Him that which He came to win.
  14. How did our Lord meet the temptation?
    With an instant refusal.
  15. Why did our Lord refuse the devil's offer?
    Because of the condition attached.
  16. What was the condition?
    All these things will I give "if Thou wilt fall down and worship me."
  17. What is meant by the word " worship " ?
    The offering of outward respect or reverence.
  18. In what words does Matthew tell us our Lord rebuked Satan?
    " Get thee hence, Satan."
  19. What is the meaning of the words "Get thee hence" ?
    Depart from Me.
  20. To whom were similar words addressed?
    To Peter.
  21. What were the words spoken to Peter?
    " Get thee behind Me, Satan " (
    Matt, xvi., 23).
  22. What difference is there between these two rebukes?
    Satan is ordered away altogether, Peter is only ordered out of our Lord's way.
  23. What is the meaning of the word " Satan " ?
    An adversary.
  24. What is the meaning of the word "devil" ?
    A slanderer or accuser.
  25. What may we learn from our Lord's use of the word " Satan " ?
    Anyone who draws us away from the way of God is an enemy.
II. - The Method of Resistance.
  1. What enabled our Lord to perceive so readily the snare of Satan?
    His mind was stored with the Word of God.
  2. How do we discover this fact?
    Because He met each temptation with a quotation from Scripture.
  3. Out of what book of the Bible did our Lord take His quotations in reply to the devil's temptations?
    Out of Deuteronomy
    (Deuteronomy vi., 13).
  4. Why is it important for us to remember whence our Lord took His quotations?
    Because He took them from that part of the Bible where we are most urged to remember, to teach and to talk about God's commandments.
  5. What lesson does this teach us?
    That the study of God's Word is the best preservative against falling into sin.
  6. How is it possible for us to command the devil to depart?
    When we are steadfast in .the faith we can resist Satan
    (1 Peter v., 8. 9).
  7. What promise have we to encourage us in this resistance?
    The apostle James tells us "resist the devil and he will flee from you"
    (James iv., 7).
  8. How does our Lord's example encourage us to become steadfast in the faith?
    He teaches us that God's Word comes to our mind and gives us an answer to the devil's lies.
III - The Message of Scripture.
  1. With what words of Scripture did our Lord meet the devil's temptation?
    " Thou shalt worship the Lord Thy God, and Him only shalt Thou serve."
  2. What do these words teach us?
    That worship and service are due to God, and to God only.
  3. What change docs our Lord make in the text?
    He changes the word " fear" into the word " worship."
    3
  4. What other difference is there between these words as they appear in Matthew and in our translation of the Old Testament?
    The word " only " appears in Matthew and not in Deuteronomy.
  5. How did this difference arise?
    The word " only " was in our Lord's Greek Bible but not in the Hebrew Bible.
  6. What is the Greek Bible of our Lord's time called?
    The Septuagint. (LXX.)
  7. Where, when, and by whom was the Septuagint translated from the Hebrew?
    In Alexandria, from 280 to 150 B.C., by the exiled Jews.
  8. Why do you think our Lord changed the word " fear" for the word " worship "?
    Outward reverence is part of the fear due to God and this was what the devil sought wrongfully to induce our Lord to give Him.
  9. What lesson may we learn from this slight change?
    That it is the meaning of Scripture that "serve" ?
    That action which comes from an inward sense of God's greatness and power.
  10. Into what two parts is our reverence for God thus divided?
    Into an outward appearance and an inward state of mind.
  11. What, then, does our text teach?
    That all religious reverence, whether outward or inward, is due to God and should be given to Him only.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What kind of worship are we commanded to give to men?
    Civil worship.
  2. In which of our Lord's parables is there a reference to this civil worship?
    In the parable of the two servants
    (Matthew xviii., 26). (In Luke xiv., 10, the word " worship" is used in A.V., but in R.V. is rendered more properly "glory.")
  3. How does the Church of Rome destroy the force of the text?
    She gives religious worship to Mary, the mother of Jesus and to Saints and Angels.
  4. How does she divide religious worship?
    Into three classes:
      (1) Latria, given to God only;
      (2) Hyperdulia, an inferior worship given to tMary, the mother of Jesus and the human nature of our Lord;
      (3) Dulia, the lowest form of religious worship given to saints and angels.
  5. What form do Hyperdulia and Dulia take in the services of the Roman Church?
    The form of addressing the objects of worship in prayer and performing outward acts of reverence, such as, bowing before the images of saints and burning candles at altars dedicated to them.
  6. How are all such practices condemned in our text?
    It says we are to worship as well as serve God only.
  7. How does the Church of Rome seek to evade this command?
    By saying that the word "only" qualifies "serve" but not "worship."
  8. How would you answer that argument?
    By pointing out that Satan asked for outward reverence or worship, and therefore, unless God alone were to receive such, the text would have no bearing on Satan's request.



Additional Texts Mentioned in the Study Questions

First Ten - Text 1
  • Question 14. For they loved the praise of men more than the praise of God. John 12., 43
  • Question 15. By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God. Romans 5., 2
  • Question 19. For he hath made him [to be] sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him. 2 Corinthians 5., 21

  • First Ten - Text 2
  • Question 8. Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, {10:20} By a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh; Hebrews 10., 19, 20
  • Question 11 And no man hath ascended up to heaven, but he that came down from heaven, [even] the Son of man which is in heaven. John 3., 13
  • Question 14. Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: John 11., 25
  • Question 16. And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent. John 17., 3
  • Question 17. Title text. Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me. John 14., 6.
  • Question 26. But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, [even] to them that believe on his name: John 1., 12
  • Question 27. For ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father. Romans 8., 15
  • Question 32. Title text. Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.
  • Question 35. [That] was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world. John 1., 9
  • Question 40. But Jesus said, Forbid him not: for there is no man which shall do a miracle in my name, that can lightly speak evil of me. Mark 9., 39

  • First Ten - Text 3
  • Question 13. For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; Romans 3., 23
  • Question 14. Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me. John 14., 6
  • Question 15. And he saith unto them, Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men. Matthew 4., 19

    Jesus heard that they had cast him out; and when he had found him, he said unto him, Dost thou believe on the Son of God? John 9., 35.

    And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up: {3:15} That whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life. John 3., 14, 15.

  • Question 27. Who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not; but committed [himself] to him that judgeth righteously: 1 Peter 2., 23
  • Question 28. But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: Philippians 2., 7
  • Question 29. And he said unto them, What counsel give ye that we may answer this people, who have spoken to me, saying, Make the yoke which thy father did put upon us lighter? {12:10} And the young men that were grown up with him spake unto him, saying, Thus shalt thou speak unto this people that spake unto thee, saying, Thy father made our yoke heavy, but make thou [it] lighter unto us; thus shalt thou say unto them, My little [finger] shall be thicker than my father's loins. {12:11} And now whereas my father did lade you with a heavy yoke, I will add to your yoke: my father hath chastised you with whips, but I will chastise you with scorpions. 1 Kings 12., 9-11

    For of old time I have broken thy yoke, [and] burst thy bands; and thou saidst, I will not transgress; when upon every high hill and under every green tree thou wanderest, playing the harlot. Jeremiah 2., 20.

    Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us. Psalms 2., 13.

  • First Ten - Text 4
  • Question 16. Now when he came nigh to the gate of the city, behold, there was a dead man carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow: and much people of the city was with her. Luke 7., 12
    For he had one only daughter, about twelve years of age, and she lay a dying. But as he went the people thronged him. Luke 8., 42
    And, behold, a man of the company cried out, saying, Master, I beseech thee, look upon my son: for he is mine only child. Luke 9., 38
    By faith Abraham, when he was tried, offered up Isaac: and he that had received the promises offered up his only begotten [son,] Hebrews 11., 17
  • Question 23. Question 23. For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; Romans 3., 23

  • First Ten - Text 5
  • Question 34. For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; Romans 3., 23
  • Question 35. But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin. 1 John 1., 7

  • First Ten - Text 6
  • Question 3. For this [is] good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour; 1 Timothy 2., 3
  • Question 10. And the servants of the king of Syria said unto him, Their gods [are] gods of the hills; therefore they were stronger than we; but let us fight against them in the plain, and surely we shall be stronger than they. {20:28} And there came a man of God, and spake unto the king of Israel, and said, Thus saith the LORD, Because the Syrians have said, The LORD [is] God of the hills, but he [is] not God of the valleys, therefore will I deliver all this great multitude into thine hand, and ye shall know that I [am] the LORD. 1 Kings 20., 23, 28
  • Question 22. For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; Romans 3., 23
  • Question 23. For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. John 3., 16
  • Question 27. Christ hath redeemed us from thecurse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written,Cursed [is] every one that hangeth on a tree: Galatians 3., 13
  • Question 29. Question 29. For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? Matthew 16., 26

  • First Ten - Text 7
  • Question 32. If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children, how much more shall your Father which is in heaven give good things to them that ask him? Matthew 7., 11
  • Question 40. For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; Romans 3., 23

  • First Ten - Text 8
  • Question 2. And therefore did the Jews persecute Jesus, and sought to slay him, because he had done these things on the sabbath day. John 5., 16
  • Question 7. Ye sent unto John, and he bare witness unto the truth. John 5., 33
  • Question 9. But I receive not testimony from man: but these things I say, that ye might be saved. John 5., 34
  • Question 11. And the Father himself, which hath sent me, hath borne witness of me. Ye have neither heard his voice at any time, nor seen his shape. John 5., 37
  • Question 25. Ye sent unto John, and he bare witness unto the truth. John 5., 33
    Do not think that I will accuse you to the Father: there is [one] that accuseth you, [even] Moses,
    in whom ye trust. John 5., 45
  • Question 30. If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall [your] heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to them that ask him? Luke 11., 13
  • Question 36. Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which
    testify of me. John 5., 39

  • First Ten - Text 9
  • Question 2. And they brought unto him also infants, that he would touch them: but when [his] disciples saw [it,] they rebuked them. Luke 18., 15
  • Question 6. And when the days of her purification according to the law of Moses were accomplished, they brought him to Jerusalem, to present [him] to the Lord; {2:23} (As it is written in the law of the Lord, Every male that openeth the womb shall be called holy to the Lord;) {2:24} And to offer a sacrifice according to that which is said in the law of the Lord, A pair of turtledoves, or two young pigeons. {2:25} And, behold, there was a man in Jerusalem, whose name [was] Simeon; and the same man [was] just and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel: and the Holy Ghost was upon him. {2:26} And it was revealed unto him by the Holy Ghost, that he should not see death, before he had seen the Lord's Christ. {2:27} And he came by the Spirit into the temple: and when the parents brought in the child Jesus, to do for him after the custom of the law, {2:28} Then took he him up in his arms, and blessed God, and said, Luke 2., 22-28
  • Question 7. And Israel stretched out his right hand, and laid it upon Ephraim's head, who [was] the younger, and his left hand upon Manasseh's head, guiding his hands wittingly; for Manasseh [was] the firstborn. Genesis 48., 14
  • Question 38. When any one heareth the word of the kingdom, and understandeth [it] not, then cometh the wicked [one,] and catcheth away that which was sown in his heart. This is he which received seed by the way side. Matthew 13., 19
  • Question 40. Question 40. Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto a net, that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every kind: {13:48} Which, when it was full, they drew to shore, and sat down, and gathered the good into vessels, but cast the bad away. Matthew 13., 47, 48

  • First Ten - Text 10
  • Question 3. And he was there in the wilderness forty days, tempted of Satan; and was with the wild beasts;and the angels ministered unto him. Mark 1., 13
  • Question 6. And Jesus being full of the Holy Ghost returned from Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness, {4:2} Being forty days tempted of the devil. And in those days he did eat nothing: and when they were ended, he afterward hungered. {4:3} And the devil said unto him, If thou be the Son of God, command this stone that it be made bread. {4:4} And Jesus answered him, saying, It is written, That man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word of God. {4:5} And the devil, taking him up into an high mountain, shewed unto him all the kingdoms of the world in a moment of time. {4:6} And the devil said unto him, All this power will I give thee, and the glory of them: for that is delivered unto me; and to whomsoever I will I give it. {4:7} If thou therefore wilt worship me, all shall be thine. {4:8} And Jesus answered and said unto him, Get thee behind me, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve. {4:9} And he brought him to Jerusalem, and set him on a pinnacle of the temple, and said unto him, If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down from hence: {4:10} For it is written, He shall give his angels charge over thee, to keep thee: {4:11} And in [their] hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time thou dash thy foot against a stone. {4:12} And Jesus answering said unto him, It is said, Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God. {4:13} And when the devil had ended all the temptation, he departed from him for a season. Luke 4., 1-13
  • Question 21. But he turned, and said unto Peter, Get thee behind me, Satan: thou art an offence unto me: for thou savourest not the things that be of God, but those that be of men. Matthew 16., 23
  • Question 28. Thou shalt fear the LORD thy God, and serve him, and shalt swear by his name. Deuteronomy 6., 13
  • Question 31. Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour: {5:9} Whom resist stedfast in the faith, knowing that the same afflictions are accomplished in your brethren that are in the world. 1 Peter 5., 8,9
  • Question 32. Submit yourselvestherefore to God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you. James 4., 7
  • Question 47. The servant therefore fell down, and worshipped him, saying, Lord, have patience with me, and I will pay thee all. Matthew 18., 26
    But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest room; that when he that bade thee cometh, he may say unto thee, Friend, go up higher: then shalt thou have worship in the presence of them that sit at meat with thee. Luke 14., 10

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