The One Hundred Texts - Text Set 10 - 2017 Version.
Swanny's
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The One Hundred Texts

Bible studies for an understanding of Reformation Christianity
Text Set 10 -
Questions and Answers


The 10 Text Sets Abbreviations and Notes Words and Expressions Scripture and Studies Index Biblical Order Index Subject and Text Index

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The Text Study Index.
Text Set 1 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 2 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 3 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 4 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 5 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 6 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 7 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 8 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 9 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 10 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


THE ONE HUNDRED TEXTS OF THE SOCIETY FOR IRISH CHURCH MISSIONS.

THE TENTH TEN

DANIEL 9., 18.

0 my God, incline thine ear, and hear; open thine eyes, and behold our desolations,
and the city which is called by thy name: for we do not present our supplications before thee for our righteousnesses, but for thy great mercies.




O my God, incline thine ear, and hear; open thine eyes, and behold our desolations,
and the city which is called by thy name: for we do not present our supplications before thee for our righteousnesses, but for thy great mercies. - R.V.

O my God, incline Your ear and hear; open Your eyes and see our desolations,
and the city which is called by Your name; for we do not present our supplications before You because of our righteous deeds, but because of Your great mercies. - N.K.J.V.

O my God, incline your ear and hear. Open your eyes and see our desolations,
and the city that is called by your name. For we do not present our pleas before you because of our righteousness, but because of your great mercy. - E.S.V.

THE TENTH TEN - TEXT 1.

I. - An Earnest Petition.
  1. Who spoke these words? Daniel.
  2. What led him to speak them?
    The fulfilment of the period of captivity (
    Daniel 9., 2).
  3. Why did his study lead him to prayer?
    It showed him that God had a future for His people.
  4. What does this teach us about our study of the Bible?
    That its promises should be the ground of our prayer.
  5. With what words does our text begin?
    "O my God," etc.
  6. What do we know about Daniel's habits of prayer?
    He prayed three times a day {
    Daniel 6., 10, 13).
  7. What do the opening words of the text suggest to us?
    The intensity of Daniel's prayer.
  8. Why is Daniel so fervent?
    Because it seemed as if God had forgotten His people.
  9. What is meant by " incline thine ear "?
    Act towards us as one would who attends to our complaint.
  10. What is meant by "open thine eyes, and behold"?
    Turn Thy pitiful regard to our condition.
II. - A Pitiable Prospect.
  1. What does Daniel ask God to consider?
    " Our desolations."
  2. What is meant by desolations?
    Places that are laid waste or destroyed.
  3. Why was desolation the lot of the people?
    Daniel 9., 16.
  4. What else does Daniel bring before God?
    The city which is " called by thy name."
  5. What is meant by "called by thy name"?
    Marked peculiarly as God's possession.
  6. What is the Douay for "called by thy name" ?
    " Upon which thy name is called."
  7. Of what New Testament passage does this remind us?
    James 2., 7.
  8. What lesson does this teach us?
    That we can appeal to God in prayer on account of His mercies in the past.
  9. To what does James most probably refer by the words "by which ye are called" ?
    To the solemn baptism " into the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost."
III. - An Unsafe Ground.
  1. What does Daniel reject as a plea before God?
    " Our righteousnesses."
  2. Why does he not venture to urge this plea?
    He had already acknowledged that their sufferings were due to their sins.
  3. What great lesson does this teach us?
    That no righteousness of ours can stand God's judgment.
IV. - A Better Foundation.
  1. What does Daniel offer as a plea before God?
    " Thy great mercies."
  2. What is meant by the word " mercies " ?
    God's sense of deep compassion.
  3. Why does Daniel plead on the ground of God's compassion?
    Because he has a deep sense that such is an attribute of God (
    Daniel 9., 9).
  4. What does this teach us as to God's nature?
    He is always ready to pity.
  5. What does it teach us about His gifts?
    They are undeserved by us and spring solely from His goodness.
  6. Why are these words remarkable in Daniel's mouth?
    Because he is a chosen example of righteousness (
    Ezekiel 14., 14, 20).
  7. What does this teach us concerning the prayers of the righteous?
    They are based on God's mercy, not on the individual's merit.
  8. Who alone intercedes on the ground of merit?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. To whom does Daniel address his prayer?
    To God only.
  2. What text gives us a reason for this?
    1 Kings 8., 39. See page 351 (Eighth Ten - Text 1).
  3. To whom does the Church of Rome teach that prayers can be offered?
    To departed saints.
  4. On what ground are we invited to pray to saints?
    That by their merits they may intercede with God for us.
  5. How does Daniel correct this false notion of merit?
    " Not ... for our righteousnesses."
  6. But do we not ask men on earth to pray?
    Only to join their prayers with ours, not to plead merit before God.
  7. What then is meant by, " The supplication of a righteous man availeth much in its working"?
    (
    James 5., 16, R.V.)
    To secure God's compassion and answer to prayer our hearts must be right, but that does not mean that we have merit.
    It is a condition not a ground for answered prayer.
  8. What evil results from offering prayer on the ground of merit?
    The evil of self-righteousness.
  9. What text reminds us of this?
    Luke 18., 13. See page 115 (Third Ten - Text 5).
  10. What lesson does our text teach us?
    All true prayers should be made to God and grounded on His mercy and not on any human merit.


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PHILIPPIANS 3., 7, 8, 9.

But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ. Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ, And be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith:




Howbeit what things were gain to me, these have I counted loss for Christ. Yea verily, and I count all things to be loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may gain Christ, and be found in him, not having a righteousness of mine own, even that which is of the law, but that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith: - R.V.

But what things were gain to me, these I have counted loss for Christ. Yet indeed I also count all things loss for the excellence of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them as rubbish, that I may gain Christ and be found in Him, not having my own righteousness, which is from the law, but that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which is from God by faith; - N.K.J.V.

But whatever gain I had, I counted as loss for the sake of Christ. Indeed, I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God that depends on faith. - E.S.V.

THE TENTH TEN - TEXT 2.

I. - A Surrendered Gain.
  1. Who wrote these words?
    The apostle Paul.
  2. To whom did he write them?
    The Philippians.
  3. What led up to these words?
    His account of his Jewish privileges.
  4. What led him to give this account?
    His warning against confidence in the flesh (
    Philippians 3., 3).
  5. Why did he utter this warning?
    Because of Jewish opponents.
  6. What does he call the Jewish opposition?
    " The concision " (
    Philippians 3., 2).
  7. Why does he use the word " concision "?
    To contrast the Jewish outward ceremony, which was now used in opposition to the Gospel, with the true spiritual meaning of the ancient God-given rite.
  8. What warning is contained in this message?
    That even a Divine institution, if perverted, may be a source of spiritual danger.
  9. How does our text begin?
    "But what things were gain to me."
  10. What does he mean by speaking of his Jewish privileges as gain?
    They were the things he set store by and which won for him the esteem of men
  11. How does he now estimate them?
    "I counted loss."
  12. What led to his change of mind?
    His knowledge of Christ.
  13. What resulted from his knowledge of Christ?
    He suffered the loss of all things.
  14. How does he show he did not regret the loss?
    He says he counts them loss still.
  15. What strong words does he add?
    He counts them but dung.
  16. What lesson is here enforced?
    All earthly advantages are worthless compared to the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.
II. - A Super-eminent Blessing.
  1. Why did Paul count all things loss?
    " For the excellency," etc.
  2. What is meant by "excellency"?
    That which stands above or surpasses all else.
  3. How does Paul describe the Lord Jesus?
    As " Christ Jesus my Lord."
  4. Why does he speak of the Lord Jesus as his Lord?
    To show how much he felt what he was saying and to emphasise his personal relation to the Lord Jesus Christ.
  5. What does the word " knowledge " as used here suggest?
    A personal acquaintance.
  6. Why did Paul throw away all things he formerly thought gain?
    That he might win Christ.
  7. What is R.V. for "win"?
    "Gain."
  8. What else did he desire?
    . To be found in Him.
III. - A Distinctive Righteousness.
  1. Why did he wish to be found in Him?
    So that he might have Christ's righteousness.
  2. With what does he contrast Christ's righteousness?
    With his own.
  3. How does he say he could lay claim to righteousness?
    By the law.
  4. What is meant by a righteousness of the law?
    A righteousness that springs out of obedience to the law of God.
  5. How is the righteousness which is of God secured?
    Through the faith of Christ.
  6. What is meant by " the righteousness of God "?
    The righteousness which comes from God.
  7. What is meant by " the righteousness which is of God by faith "?
    That which is obtained by meahs of faith.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does Paul here contrast?
    His own righteousness and that which comes from God.
  2. What had he previously said about his righteousness?
    He was blameless.
  3. What did he mean by saying he was blameless?
    That judged by the standard around no one could charge him with a fault in observing the duties of the law.
  4. Yet when he came to know Christ how did he esteem this perfection?
    As dung.
  5. What error is charged on Protestants by Romish controversialists?
    That we teach man must sin.
  6. Why is this charge laid against us?
    To exalt the idea of men's righteousness and saintly excellencies.
  7. In what are saintly excellencies usually made to consist?
    In just such works of rigour and religious observance as Paul describes.
  8. Do we despise really holy works?
    On no account: but we warn men not to depend on them as satisfying God's holy demands.
  9. How does Paul teach that human righteousness cannot-justify?
    He says of himself, who was blameless, that he desired to gain God's righteousness, in Christ and not in himself.


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JUDE 20., 21.

But ye, beloved, building up yourselves on your most holy faith, praying in the Holy Ghost,
Keep yourselves in the love of God, looking for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ unto eternal life.




But ye, beloved, building up yourselves on your most holy faith, praying in the Holy Spirit,
keep yourselves in the love of God, looking for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ unto eternal life. - R.V.

But you, beloved, building yourselves up on your most holy faith, praying in the Holy Spirit,
keep yourselves in the love of God, looking for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ unto eternal life. - N.K.J.V.

But you, beloved, building yourselves up in your most holy faith and praying in the Holy Spirit,
keep yourselves in the love of God, waiting for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ that leads to eternal life. - E.S.V.

THE TENTH TEN - TEXT 3.

I. - A Base for Edification.
  1. Who wrote these words?
    Jude
  2. What do we know about Jude?
    He was one of the Lord's brethren.
    Matthew 13., 55; Mark 6., 3.
  3. With what object did he write this Epistle?
    See
    Jude verse 3.
  4. What was the occasion of his writing?
    See verse 4.
  5. hat does this teach us?
    That God's truth was opposed from the beginning.
  6. How is the difficulty of these ungodly men to be met?
    The text,
    Jude verses 20, 21.
  7. What is the first thing about which our text speaks?
    " Building up yourselves," etc.
  8. What is meant by "building up yourselves"?
    Forming life and character in accordance with the faith professed.
  9. What is meant by "your most holy faith"?
    The contents of the Gospel believed by them.
  10. How has Jude already described it?
    See
    Jude verse 3.
  11. What does this (verse 3Isaiah 43., 22-24.) teach us concerning the faith?
    That God has given it; to be preached to men.
  12. What other reference does Jude make to the delivery of the faith?
    Jude verse 17.
  13. What is the main warning of this Epistle?
    To hold fast the truth given to the Apostles.
  14. How can we best accomplish this?
    By " building up " ourselves on this faith.
  15. Where do we get the material with which to build?
    In God's Word.
II. - A Principle of Prayer.
  1. What practical advice does the writer next give us as to the way of "building up" ourselves?
    " Praying," etc.
  2. What has Jude to say concerning prayer?
    That it should be in the Holy Spirit.
  3. What is meant by " praying in the Holy Ghcst"?
    Praying under the guidance and according to the mind of the Spirit.
  4. How can we be sure we are praying in the Spirit?
    When we seek the Spirit's aid and follow the Spirit's teaching.
  5. What two evils have already been mentioned by Jude against which the opening words of our text protect us?
    The evil of " they who make separations" (R.V.), and of the " sensual " having not the Spirit. (
    Jude verse 19.)
  6. What lesson does the contrast teach us?
    That those who follow God's Word are possessed of His Spirit and rejoice in communion with fellow-Christians.
  7. Against what are we guarded by this warning?
    Against the danger of lightly breaking the harmony of the Church of God.
III. - A Situation to Guard.
  1. How is this further emphasised?
    " Keep yourselves in the love of God."
  2. What is most probably meant by " the love of God "?
    God's love to us.
  3. What is the meaning of the word " keep "?
    Watch carefully, or guard diligently.
  4. What does this teach us?
    That we should always be on our guard lest we lose a sense of God's love.
IV. - A Boon to Expect.
  1. What else does he tell the Christians?
    " Looking for," etc.
  2. What is meant by " looking for"?
    Waiting patiently till blessing comes.
  3. For what were they to look?
    Mercy unto eternal life.
  4. What lesson does this teach us?
    That salvation is progressive and there is always something more to expect until eternal life is realised.
  5. What prayer in our Prayer Book expresses this idea?
    " Granting us in this world," etc. (A Prayer of St. Chrysostom.)
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. Against whom does Jude warn us?
    Evil teachers in the Church.
  2. How does he show this is not a new thing?
    By references to Egypt, Sodom and Gomorrha, Cain, Balaam, Korah.
  3. What remedy does he offer for this evil?
    That we should build up ourselves in the faith once for all delivered to the saints.
  4. How does the Church of Rome suggest the evil of false teaching can he met?
    By a living, speaking, infallible judge.
  5. Where then would the inquirer be led to look?
    To the present Pope of Rome.
  6. To what does Jude direct attention?
    To the words which have been spoken by the Apostles.
  7. What helps does he offer against error?
    " The faith which was once delivered," and the love of God revealed to us.
  8. On what does a Roman Catholic depend?
    The voice of the Church.
  9. How does Jude teach us that this is a mistake?
    By pointing out that the evil is in the Church, but not in the faith once delivered.


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ROMANS 3., 24, 25, 26.

Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus:
Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare
his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God;
To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just,
and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus.




Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus:
whom God set forth to be a propitiation, through faith, by his blood, to shew
his righteousness because of the passing over of the sins done aforetime, in the forbearance of God;
for the shewing, I say, of his righteousness at this present season: that he might himself be just,
and the justifier of him that hath faith in Jesus. - R.V.

Being justified freely by His grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus,
whom God set forth as a propitiation by His blood, through faith, to demonstrate
His righteousness, because in His forbearance God had passed over the sins that were
previously committed, to demonstrate at the present time His righteousness, that He might be just
and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus. - N.K.J.V.

And are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus,
whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith. This was to show God's righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins. It was to show his righteousness at the present time, so that he might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus. - E.S.V.

THE TENTH TEN - TEXT 4.

I. - A Free Justification.
  1. What are the opening words of our text?
    " Being justified," etc.
  2. What is meant by " justified"?
    Accounted righteous, treated as though we had never sinned.
  3. What word is added to justified?
    " Freely."
  4. What is the meaning of the word "freely"?
    As a free gift.
  5. How is the idea of " freely" further emphasised?
    The words " by His grace " are added.
  6. What is meant by "grace"?
    God's free unmerited favour.
  7. What other words are used in connection with "being justified"?
    " Through the redemption."
  8. What is the meaning of "redemption"?
    A buying back.
  9. From what does Paul say elsewhere we are redeemed?
    " From the curse of the law."
    Galatians 3., 13.
  10. Where does Paul place our redemption?
    " In Christ Jesus."
  11. What is meant by " redemption that is in Christ Jesus "? (R.V.)
    Ransom or freedom in connection with Jesus Christ.
II. - A Divine Propitiation.
  1. How is this redemption further described?
    " A propitiation," ctc.
  2. What is meant by "propitiation"?
    That which enables God to deal favourably with the sinner.
  3. What does Paul say about God's act in propitiation?
    He set forth our Lord Jesus Christ as a propitiation.
  4. What is meant by "set forth"?
    Either (a) Purposed. See A.V. marg., "fore-ordained"; and R.V. marg., "purposed"; or (b) declared, manifested.
  5. How is the nature of " propitiation " further explained?
    By the words, " In His blood."
  6. What is meant by propitiation " in His blood " ?
    That the death and bloodshedding of our Lord Jesus Christ provides the means which enable God to look favourably on the sinner.
  7. How is this propitiation secured?
    Through faith.
III. - A Divine Object.
  1. What great object had God in view in thus setting forth our Lord?
    " To declare," etc.
  2. What is meant by declaring God's righteousness?
    Making clear to all God's essential justice.
  3. What special reason was there for making God's righteousness clear?
    That past sins might be remitted.
  4. What is the exact meaning of the word " remission " used here?
    Passing over.
  5. What difficulty was created by passing over these sins?
    There was no revealed way of pardon.
  6. Why do we say there was no revealed way of pardon?
    Because the Old Testament sacrifices make no provision for sins done with a high hand.
  7. To what does Paul attribute the passing over of these sins?
    The forbearance of God.
  8. What is the meaning of the word "forbearance"?
    A holding back of wrath, compare
    Matthew 17., 17.
  9. When does Paul say God's righteousness in forbearance was shown?
    " At this time."
  10. To what time does he refer?
    The time when our Lord was set forth as a propitiation.
IV. - A Double Consequence.
  1. What two consequences follow this manifestation?
    That God is seen both as just and as the Justifier.
  2. What is meant by just and the Justifier?
    God preserves His righteous character while finding a way to regard the sinner as free from sin.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does Paul say in our texts concerning Justification?
    We are justified freely by God's grace.
  2. What is taught by the use of both these phrases?
    That Justification springs from God's free favour and is given to us without any merit on our part.
  3. What means of Justification is mentioned in our text?
    Faith.
  4. What causes of Justification does the Church of Rome mention?
    Faith, the turning and disposing of a man's own will, the sacraments.
  5. What ground of justification is taught in the text?
    The Propitiation of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  6. What ground of justification is taught in the Church of Rome?
    The merits of Christ and the saints, and the good works of Christians done in a state of grace.
  7. Of what class of persons is God said to be the Justifier?
    Believers, - " Of him who believeth in Jesus."
  8. What may we conclude from the absence of any other condition?
    That no other condition is required.
  9. What other ground is offered for saying faith is sufficient?
    He who believes establishes the fact that God is just in forgiving.
  10. What is the great lesson of our text?
    The only way to satisfy God's righteousness is to trust in the Son of His appointment.


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1 CORINTHIANS 15., 55, 56, 57.

0 death, where is thy sting? 0 grave, where is thy victory ?
The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law.
But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.




O death, where is thy victory? O death, where is thy sting?
The sting of death is sin; and the power of sin is the law:
but thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. - R.V.

"O Death, where is your sting? O Hades, where is your victory?"
The sting of death is sin, and the strength of sin is the law.
But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. - N.K.J.V.

"O death, where is your victory?
O death, where is your sting?"
The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law.
But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. - E.S.V.

THE TENTH TEN - TEXT 5.

I. - Two Grave Questions.
  1. Who wrote these words?
    The apostle Paul.
  2. To whom did he write them?
    The Corinthians.
  3. What led him to write on this subject?
    Some of the Corinthians denied the Resurrection.
  4. What relation do these words bear to the previous argument?
    They form a triumphant conclusion to it.
  5. What text of Scripture is quoted immediately before our text?
    Isaiah 25. 8.
  6. What text in the Old Testament closely resembles Paul's triumphant cry?
    Hosea 13., 14.
  7. On what does Paul base his expectation of triumph?
    On the Resurrection of the body.
  8. How does he describe the Resurrection?
    1 Corinthians 15., 53, 54.
  9. What does this teach us?
    That the whole man, body and soul, will be finally redeemed and purified by our Lord Jesus Christ.
  10. What is the first question?
    " O death where is thy sting"?
  11. To what is death compared here?
    To a venomous insect. (See Note.)
  12. What does the question suggest?
    That death has been made harmless, robbed of its sting.
  13. What is the second question?
    " O grave, where is thy victory"?
  14. What is meant by " grave " ?
    The unseen or covered place, Hades.
  15. What alteration is made in R.V.?
    Death is used in both questions and the order is reversed.
  16. What does Paul mean by saying death has no victory because its sting is gone?
    The Resurrection abolishes death and all its power.
II. - Two Clear Answers.
  1. What answer does Paul give to the question as to the sting of death?
    " The sting of death is sin."
  2. What answer does he give to the question of death's victory?
    " The strength of sin is the law."
  3. What is meant by speaking of sin as " the sting of death " ?
    It is the presence of sin in us that makes it possible for death to hurt us.
  4. Of what text does this remind us?
    Romans 6., 23. page 48 (Second Ten - Text 1).
  5. What is meant by saying "the strength of sin is the law" ?
    Our sin awakens all the terrors of God's law against us.
  6. What great lesson do these words teach us?
    That the one thing to dread is sin which enlists against us God's law.
III. - An Assurance of Victory.
  1. What does Paul add?
    " Thanks be to God," etc.
  2. Whv does he say " which giveth us the victory "?
    To teach that it is only the power of God that conquers death.
  3. What is meant by " through our Lord Jesus Christ"?
    By means of what our Lord has done for us.
  4. To what act of our Lord is Paul specially referring?
    To His Resurrection.
  5. How did our Lord's Resurrection bring victory to us?
    He brought the power of sin to nothing, conquering it by His death and Resurrection.
  6. Why is our Lord's death our victory?
    He died for us and we are united to Him by faith.
  7. How is the communication of our Lord's power to us previously described in this chapter?
    1 Corinthians 15., 45.
  8. What is the hope of the Christian?
    That through our Lord Jesus Christ sin and death finally will be destroyed.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What is the Roman Catholic teaching on Purgatory?
    The creed of Pius iv. says, " I stedfastly hold that there is a Purgatory, and that the souls therein detained are helped by the suffrages of the faithful." (Faa di Bruno, Catholic Belief, 31st Edition, page 240.)
  2. Why does Rome allege that souls are sent to Purgatory?
    To make satisfaction for the temporal punishment due to sin.
  3. What is meant by " temporal punishment" ?
    Punishment for sin which lasts for a time only.
  4. What power does this give to death and sin?
    Power still to afflict us with the consequences of our wrong doing.
  5. What does Paul teach in our text?
    That the sting of sin is taken from death, and we have victory in death.
  6. If the sting of death is taken away why do those who are true Christians die?
    Death is to them the final act in their purification.
  7. How does Paul show that death is not necessary to all?
    See
    1 Corinthians 15., 51.
  8. When the change comes to the living, what happens?
    They put on incorruption and immortality.
  9. Wherein do those who die differ from them?
    They are called to wait, with Christ, for the Resurrection.
  10. How does Rome's teaching on Purgatory contradict our texts?
    It suggests that death ushers us into a place of punishment, and thus stings us by reason of our sin.


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ROMANS 8., 26, 27.

Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought:
but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered.
And he that searcheth the hearts knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit,
because he maketh intercession for the saints according to the will of God.




And in like manner the Spirit also helpeth our infirmity: for we know not how to pray as we ought;
but the Spirit himself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered;
and he that searcheth the hearts knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit,
because he maketh intercession for the saints according to the will of God. - R.V.

Likewise the Spirit also helps in our weaknesses. For we do not know what we should pray for as we ought,
but the Spirit Himself makes intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered.
Now He who searches the hearts knows what the mind of the Spirit is,
because He makes intercession for the saints according to the will of God. - N.K.J.V.

Likewise the Spirit helps us in our weakness. For we do not know what to pray for as we ought,
but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groanings too deep for words.
And he who searches hearts knows what is the mind of the Spirit,
because the Spirit intercedes for the saints according to the will of God. - E.S.V.

THE TENTH TEN - TEXT 6.

I. - An Aid to Prayer.
  1. With what word does our text begin?
    "Likewise."
  2. What is meant by. " likewise " ?
    Similarly, "and in like manner" (R.V.).
  3. What comparison is introduced by these words?
    Comparison between groaning and patient waiting (
    Romans 8., 23-25).
  4. For what are we said to wait?
    " The redemption of our body " (
    Romans 8 23).
  5. What is meant by waiting in hope of this redemption?
    Waiting for the completion of God's purpose in us.
  6. What is the meaning here of the word "hope"?
    "A well grounded expectation of coming good."
  7. How does it differ from the modern use of the word hope?
    It has no idea of uncertainty in it (compare
    Hebrews vi., 19).
  8. What difficulty do we find in prayer?
    "We know not what we should pray for as we ought."
  9. What is the reason of this difficulty?
    Our infirmities.
  10. What is meant by "infirmities" ?
    Weakness, lack of power.
  11. What great aid is here set forth?
    " The Spirit also helpeth," etc.
  12. What is conveyed by the word used for helpeth?
    That two help each other to bear a burden.
  13. What does this teach us about the Holy Spirit?
    He it is Who acts for us, and in us, enabling us to " pray as we ought."
II. - An All Powerful Advocate.
  1. What is the work here ascribed to the Spirit?
    He " maketh intercession for us."
  2. How does He make intercession?
    By directing our prayers and aspirations into a right channel.
  3. What is therefore the condition requisite for true prayer?
    To be " in the Spirit."
  4. How is the Spirit's intercession described?
    " With groanings which cannot be uttered."
  5. What is meant by " groanings which cannot be uttered"?
    Desires which pass the limit of conscious speech.
III. - A Harmony of Purpose.
  1. Where are these unexpressed desires found?
    In the heart.
  2. To whom alone are they known?
    To God.
  3. How is God described in the text?
    As " He that searcheth the hearts."
  4. What are we told concerning God?
    . He " knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit."
  5. What does our church teach concerning the Holy Spirit?
    Article v. says, "The Holy Ghost, proceeding from the; Ather-and the Son, is of one substance, majesty, and glory, with the Father and the Son, very and eternal God."
  6. What does our text say concerning the Holy Spirit?
    " He maketh intercession for the saints according to the will of God."
  7. What is the nature of His intercession?
    He creates in us a desire after God.
  8. What is the difference between this intercession and that of our Lord Jesus Christ?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ intercedes for us with the Father.
    The Holy Spirit intercedes in and through us.
  9. What are the different objects of these intercessions?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ's intercession secures our pardon and acceptance, the Holy Spirit's intercession is a condition of our progress in holiness.
  10. What is the ground of the harmony between " He that searcheth the hearts " and the Holy Spirit?
    That the Spirit maketh intercession according to the will of God.
  11. What is meant by according to the will of God?
    In full accordance with God's nature and purpose.
  12. What lesson does this teach us?
    That a Divine Intercessor alone can interpret the mind of God for us and make it effective in us.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What is the Roman doctrine of Intercession of Saints?
    " That the saints, reigning together with Christ are to be venerated and invocated." (Creed of Pope Pius IV.)
  2. On what grounds do Roman Catholics teach that it is good and useful profitably to invoke the saints?
    That " God confers on us many blessings through their merit and favour." (Catechism of Council of Trent, New Edition, Duffy, Dublin, 1867, Part iii., Chapter ii., Question xii., p. 317.)
  3. To what class of persons is this invocation restricted?
    To " the saints, reigning together with Christ."
  4. Why is invocation restricted to them?
    Because they alone are regarded as enjoying the presence of God and having therefore power with Him. Others are suffering in purgatory or fighting on earth. They are reigning.
  5. On what grounds are the saints supposed to intercede?
    On the ground of our Lord's merit and their own.
  6. To what do we offer objection in this theory of invocation?
    Both to the ground on which it is based, and to the alleged necessity of it.
  7. What objection do we offer to the ground of it?
    It assumes that God has regard to the merits of the Saints.
  8. Why do we object to its alleged necessity?
    Because we are assured that " the Spirit maketh intercession for us."
  9. What does this teach us about the prayers of saints on earth?
    They are efficacious because they are guided by the Holy Spirit.
  10. Why do we not ask for similar prayers from departed saints?
    Because we have no warrant from Holy Scripture that they can be intercessors for us, or even hear us. (See below, page 526.)


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GOSPEL of LUKE 1., 3, 4.

It seemed good to me also, having had perfect understanding of all things from the very first,
to write unto thee in order, most excellent Theophilus, That thou mightest know
the certainty of those things, wherein thou hast been instructed.




It seemed good to me also, having traced the course of all things accurately from the first,
to write unto thee in order, most excellent Theophilus; that thou mightest know
the certainty concerning the things wherein thou wast instructed. - R.V.

It seemed good to me also, having had perfect understanding of all things from the very first,
to write to you an orderly account, most excellent Theophilus, that you may know the
certainty of those things in which you were instructed. - N.K.J.V.

It seemed good to me also, having followed all things closely for some time past,
to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theophilus, that you may have
certainty concerning the things you have been taught. - E.S.V.

THE TENTH TEN - TEXT 7.

I. - A Declaration of a Resolve.
  1. Who wrote these words?
    Luke.
  2. To whom were they written?
    Theophilus.
  3. What title is given to Theophilus?
    " Most excellent."
  4. To whom was this title, " Most excellent," given?
    To those who occupied a position in the government of the country.
  5. What leads us to think the title is so used here?
    It is omitted in
    Acts 1., 1.
  6. What is the meaning of the name Theophilus?
    Lover of God.
  7. What does this suggest?
    That the name may be given to conceal the identity of the person.
  8. How does Luke express his wish to write?
    " It seemed good to me also."
  9. What fact made it seem good to Luke to write?
    Luke 1., 1.
  10. What does this teach us about the Gospel records?
    That there were a number of written accounts before our present Gospels.
  11. What makes this fact of great importance?
    It shows us that the story of our Lord's life was taken from those who "were eyewitnesses, and ministers of the word."
II. - A Justification of a Resolve.
  1. What claim does Luke make that justified his writings?
    He had a perfect understanding of all things from the very first.
  2. What is R.V. for "a perfect understanding," etc.?
    " Having traced the course of all things accurately from the first."
  3. What does the Greek word used here mean?
    To follow a thing " very closely."
  4. What claim does Luke make for his record?
    That he took pains to sift out the evidence.
  5. What other word deepens this impression?
    He says he wrote " in order."
  6. What is meant by the words " in order " ?
    In the proper relation one after another.
  7. What confidence does this give us?
    It shows that the Gospel story has been examined and tested by a careful writer.
III. - A Definite Object in View.
  1. How did Luke carry out his purpose?
    By writing the Gospel.
  2. How does he state the object he had in view?
    " That thou mightest know," etc.
  3. What is the Greek word used for " instructed"?
    The equivalent to catechised.
  4. What does this tell us about Theophilus?
    He had been instructed by teachers who taught by word of mouth.
  5. What did Luke's Gospel offer him?
    " Certainty."
  6. What is the meaning of the word used for certainty?
    It means firmness, stability (compare adjective in
    Acts 21., 34; 22., 30)
  7. How could Luke's writing give certainty?
    It was a permanent record of carefully arranged facts.
  8. What light does this throw upon the Bible?
    It reveals God's purpose in giving it to us.
  9. What is God's purpose in giving the Bible?
    That we may surely know His will.
  10. What is necessary if we are to know God's will certainly?
    We must study it carefully.
  11. What is the relation here given between teaching by word of mouth and the reading of the Gospel?
    The Gospel gives us certainty that what is taught is true.
  12. What obligation does this lay on us?
    To test all teaching by God's Holy Word.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. In what does the Church of Rome place certainty?
    In the living, speaking voice of the Church,
  2. Where is that voice to be found?
    In the reigning Pope.
  3. When does the Pope give the real voice of the Church?
    When he speaks ex cathedra.
  4. What is meant by speaking " ex cathedra " ?
    Speaking from St. Peter's Chair as Doctor and Pastor of all Christians.
  5. What claim does Luke make to give certainty to his writing?
    He traced all things from the beginning.
  6. From whom did he get his information?
    From the accounts of eye witnesses.
  7. What result followed from reading his Gospel?
    Theophilus had certainty.
  8. If we read the same Gospel what result should follow?
    We, too, should be certain.
  9. Why does the Church of Rome think we cannot be sure?
    She says we need an infallible interpreter.
  10. How does the message to Theophilus correct that idea?
    Theophilus was not himself infallible and yet he got certainty from Luke's record.


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GOSPEL of JOHN 20., 30, 31.

And many other signs truly did Jesus in the presence of his disciples,
which are not written in this book: But these are written, that ye might believe
that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name.




Many other signs therefore did Jesus in the presence of the disciples,
which are not written in this book: but these are written, that ye may believe
that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye may have life in his name. - R.V.

And truly Jesus did many other signs in the presence of His disciples,
which are not written in this book; but these are written that you may believe
that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that believing you may have life in His name. - N.K.J.V.

Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of the disciples,
which are not written in this book; but these are written so that you may believe
that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name. - E.S.V.

THE TENTH TEN - TEXT 8.

I. - Selected Signs.
  1. hat name is given to the works of Jesus?
    " Signs."
  2. What is meant by a sign?
    A work or act that teaches some lesson or signifies some truth.
  3. How is the word " sign" frequently translated in the apostle John's Gospel?
    Miracle.
  4. What are the other words used in the New Testament for miracle?
    Wonder, power, work.
  5. Putting all these words together what do they teach us about a miracle?
    That it is an unusual event wrought by divine power and teaches some great truth concerning the work of God.
  6. By what word does John prefer to describe a miracle?
    The word " sign."
  7. Why does he prefer this word?
    Because his object in writing was to show what was the nature and object of our Lord's life and work.
  8. What does he tell us first in our text about the signs that Jesus did?
    That there were many others in addition to those recorded.
  9. What may we learn from this fact?
    That our Lord's recorded miracles are a selection giving definite messages as to His nature and work.
  10. Before whom were our Lord's signs performed?
    Before the disciples.
  11. What is the meaning of the word "disciple" ?
    A learner.
  12. Whnt does the fact that our Lord showed signs to them teach us?
    That it is only as we learn of Jesus we understand His will.
  13. Why did our Lord work His signs before His disciples?
    In order that they might be true witnesses to the world of His power and love.
  14. What is meant by the words " in this book" ?
    In John's Gospel.
  15. Where can we read of other signs done by Jesus?
    In the other three Gospels.
  16. What miracle is common to all four Gospels?
    The feeding of the five thousand.
  17. What other miracle is recorded in John and in some of the other Gospels?
    Christ walking on the sea.
  18. What may we learn from this peculiarity of John's Gospel?
    That he was anxious to show our Lord's power over nature.
II. - With a Definite Object.
  1. What does John say is his object in recording the signs?
    " That ye might believe," etc. '
  2. What two titles does he here give to our Lord?
    " The Christ, the Son of God."
  3. What is meant by "the Christ" ?
    The Anointed of God, the Messiah.
  4. What is the usual meaning that John attaches to the title " Son of God " ?
    The Being Who partakes of the fulness of the Father's nature.
  5. What two truths are thus taught us by the miracles of Jesus?
    That He is the appointed Saviour and Himself truly God.
III. - For a Blessed Result.
  1. What does John invite us to do?
    To believe " that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God."
  2. What is meant by the word " believe " ?
    To accept as true and repose confidence in any one or any thing.
  3. What result follows from believing that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God?
    Ye have life through His name.
  4. Why does life come through believing in Jesus?
    Because He is appointed of God to give life, and being God, He is able to give it.
  5. What does this teach us about the nature of our faith?
    If it is a true faith it calls Jesus Lord.
  6. What example is given us immediately before?
    The example of Thomas (
    John 20., 28).
  7. What is meant by life in the name of Jesus?
    Eternal happiness, all that makes life worth living through the personal work of our Lord Jesus Christ.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. How does the Church of Rome sometimes employ this text?
    To prove that there are records of Jesus not contained in the Gospels.
  2. As a matter of fact where are such professed records to be found?
    In what are called the Apocryphal Gospels.
  3. What is peculiar about these records?
    They contradict
    John 2., 11, by attributing miracles to our Lord as a child, and the stories they tell are mere wonders and not signs.
  4. What other objection can be made to these alleged miracles?
    There is no evidence that can satisfy us they are genuine.
  5. What does John declare about the signs he recorded?
    They are sufficient to secure belief.
  6. What does the Church of Rome teach about the New Testament?
    That it must be supplemented by tradition.
  7. What does John declare here concerning one of its books?
    That there is material enough in it to secure eternal life to the believer.
  8. What argument can we draw from this statement?
    That if one book is sufficient there is abundance of provision in the New Testament.
  9. What other objection can be urged against tradition?
    The early Christians did not depend on it.
  10. What great truth therefore does our text teach?
    That in John's Gospel alone there is sufficient to lead the prayerful reader to living faith in our Lord Jesus Christ, and so to secure eternal life.


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1 TIMOTHY 4., 1, 2, 3.

Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils; Speaking lies in hypocrisy; having their conscience seared
with a hot iron; Forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from meats, which God hath created to be received with thanksgiving of them which believe and know the truth.




But the Spirit saith expressly, that in later times some shall fall away from the faith, giving heed to
seducing spirits and doctrines of devils, through the hypocrisy of men that speak lies, branded in their own conscience
as with a hot iron; forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from meats, which God created to be received with thanksgiving by them that believe and know the truth. - R.V.

Now the Spirit expressly says that in latter times some will depart from the faith, giving heed to
deceiving spirits and doctrines of demons, speaking lies in hypocrisy, having their own conscience
seared with a hot iron, forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from foods which God created
to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and know the truth. - N.K.J.V.

Now the Spirit expressly says that in later times some will depart from the faith by devoting themselves to
deceitful spirits and teachings of demons, through the insincerity of liars whose consciences are seared,
who forbid marriage and require abstinence from foods that God created to be received with
thanksgiving by those who believe and know the truth. - E.S.V.

THE TENTH TEN - TEXT 9.

I. - A Definite Message.
  1. How does our text begin?
    " Now the Spirit speaketh expressly."
  2. Why is the word " now " put in?
    To indicate a contrast with what has gone before.
  3. What preceded the text?
    " Great is the mystery of godliness," etc.
  4. What then is the argument here?
    That notwithstanding abundant evidence there will be an abandonment of faith.
  5. Who is stated by Paul to give this message?
    " The Spirit."
  6. What is meant by the Spirit speaking?
    That men were uttering these warnings under the direct guidance of the Spirit.
  7. What does this teach us about the New Testament prophetic message?
    That it was recognised by the speakers and their hearers as coming directly from God.
  8. What examples have we of prophetic messages?
    Agabus.
    Acts 11., 28; 21., 10; Compare 2 Thessalonians 2., 3 forward
  9. What word is added to emphasise the Spirit's message?
    " Expressly.""expressly" added?
    To show that this is no mere inference but a plain statement.
  10. What is meant by expressly?
    Definitely, in so many words.
  11. Why is the word "expressly added?
    To show that this is no mere inference but a plain statement.
  12. What does this tell us?
    That departure from the faith was foreseen by God.
II. - For a Particular Age.
  1. To what time does the Spirit refer?
    " The latter times."
  2. What is meant by "the latter times"?
    The days following on the apostolic message.
  3. What mistake is likely to be made in thinking of the words "later times"?
    The mistake of regarding them as referring wholly to the closing days of our dispensation.
  4. What message of Paul corrects this mistake?
    Acts 20., 29.
  5. Where does Paul again remind Timothy of a similar departure from truth?
    2 Timothy 3., 1-8.
  6. What term does he use there?
    " The last days."
  7. What does the word "last" in that message mean?
    The very farthest limit cf time.
  8. Where is even this word applied to the period of the Apostles?
    1 John 2., 18.
  9. To what is the reference in this verse?
    To the Anti-Christ.
  10. What are we to understand by the " last times "?
    The period that completed the revelation of God, and ushers in the eternal ages (See
    Hebrews 1., 2).
III. - A Revealed Apostasy.
  1. What led men to depart from the faith?
    " Giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils"
  2. How is the character of the seducers given?
    " Speaking lies in hypocrisy," etc.
  3. What is the R.V. for " speaking lies in hypocrisy"?
    " Through the hypocrisy of men that speak lies."
  4. What is meant by "having their conscience seared"?
    " Branded in their own conscience." (R.V.)
  5. What is the likely reference?
    To the custom of branding criminals.
  6. What is their peculiar hypocrisy?
    A pretence of austerity covering an evil life.
  7. What is the warning of the text?
    That even persons knowing themselves to be hypocrites are capable of leading astray others who listen.
  8. What other solemn warning is given in the text?
    That the source of such false teaching is in the suggestion of evil spirits.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. To whom does the note in the Rhemish Testament refer these words?
    To the Gnostics, Marcionites and the Encratites, the Manicheans and other ancient heretics.
  2. Who were these people?
    Early heretics who regarded marriage as sinful and the use of flesh meat as partaking of an evil spirit.
  3. Why is the Church of Rome so anxious thus to fix the meaning of the text?
    Because she forbids marriage in certain cases, and commands to abstain from meats.
  4. What reply can be given to the Roman argument?
    It was the existence of these extravagant sects that paved the way for monasticism and clerical celibacy.
  5. How did the early Church treat these heretics?
    It condemned their teaching and exalted marriage as a provision of God.
  6. What are we to say concerning fasting?
    The Bible encourages fasting as a help to repentance, but never makes distinctions between meats as such.
  7. What can we say concerning the warning of our text?
    That the origin of forbidding to marry and commanding to abstain from meats is from evil spirits.
  8. What attitude ought Christians to take?
    To avoid all such errors and give these things the place God gives them.
  9. How does the celibacy of the clergy particularly come under the condemnation of the text?
    It is enforced in direct opposition to the plain regulations of Scripture contained in this very Epistle.
    1 Timothy 3., 2, 12.
  10. What argument can be drawn from the close connection of these regulations?
    Paul could never speak of forbidding to marry as a doctrine of devils and yet immediately before have allowed clergy to be married, if he thought they as a class were forbidden to enter into matrimony.


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REVELATION 22., 8, 9.

And I John saw these things, and heard them. And when I had heard and seen,
I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which showed me these things.
Then saith he unto me, See thou do it not: for I am thy fellow-servant, and of thy
brethren the prophets, and of them which keep the sayings of this book: worship God.




And I John am he that heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw,
I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which shewed me these things.
And he saith unto me, See thou do it not: I am a fellow-servant with thee and with thy
brethren the prophets, and with them which keep the words of this book: worship God. - R.V.

Now I, John, saw and heard these things. And when I heard and saw,
I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel who showed me these things.
Then he said to me, "See that you do not do that. For I am your fellow servant, and of your
b brethren the prophets, and of those who keep the words of this book. Worship God." - N.K.J.V.

I, John, am the one who heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw them,
I fell down to worship at the feet of the angel who showed them to me,
but he said to me, "You must not do that! I am a fellow servant with you and your
brothers the prophets, and with those who keep the words of this book. Worship God." - E.S.V.

THE TENTH TEN - TEXT 10.

I. - The Speaker and His Testimony.
  1. How does our text begin?
    " And I John, saw these things."
  2. What does the Revelation tell us as to where John was?
    That he was in Patmos.
    Revelation 1., 9.
  3. By what name is John known in the Gospel?
    The disciple whom Jesus loved. (
    John 19., 26.)
  4. What help does the reference to Patmos give us in fixing the authorship of Revelation?
    There is a very early tradition that John was exiled to Patmos.
  5. What testimony to the truth of the book is here given?
    " I John saw these things, and heard them."
  6. What is the natural inference from the words?
    That the writer was a person whose word carried weight.
  7. In what place did the book first circulate?
    In Asia Minor. (
    Revelation 1., 4, et seq.)
  8. How does this connect the book with John?
    He spent his closing years among the Asiatic churches.
  9. To what does "these things" refer?
    To the visions of the book, particularly
    Revelation xxi. and xxii. to 7.
  10. What had John heard?
    The messages that came from God, particularly the words " Behold I come quickly."
  11. Why are the words " I John," etc., written here?
    To assure us that the visions and messages were not the writer's own, but were given him.
  12. What great lesson does this teach us?
    That God is concerned with human affairs.
II. - The Act of Worship and its Rebuke.
  1. What did John do?
    He fell down to worship the angel.
  2. What is the meaning of the word "Angel"?
    Messenger.
  3. What lesson is thus brought home?
    That angels are subject beings.
  4. What is meant by the word "worship"?
    An outward act, expressing reverence and inward respect, or devotion.
  5. In what two senses is it used in the New Testament?
    Of respect shown to men,
    Luke 14., 10, and of worship of God.
  6. What did the angel say?
    " See thou do it not."
  7. On how many occasions was John rebuked?
    Two.
  8. What was the other?
    It is recorded in
    Revelation 19., 10.
III. - The Ground of the Rebuke.
  1. What is remarkable about the two rebukes?
    The same reason is given in both.
  2. What is the reason?
    " I am thy fellow-servant," etc.
  3. Why did the angel speak of himself as a fellow-servant?
    To show that he also was under the command of God.
  4. What is the R.V.?
    "I am a fellow-servant with thee."
  5. What is the point of saying "I am a fellow-servant with thee and with thy brethren the prophets"?
    To teach us that religious worship should not be offered from man to man.
  6. What three classes of servants are mentioned?
    John, the prophets, and those who keep the sayings of this book.
  7. What does this teach us?
    That all holy persons who follow God are in the rank of servants.
  8. What is meant by, "the sayings of this book"?
    The actual words which compose it.
  9. What words did the angel add that makes his meaning clear?
    " Worship God."
  10. What great lesson is here taught?
    All worship of a religious nature should be reserved for God and Him alone.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What proof is there that this text contradicts directly Rome's teaching?
    Half of it is quoted to support it.
  2. In what books of instruction is half of this text found in support of Angel-worship?
    In Dr. Doyle's Abridgment of the Christian Doctrine and in Keenan's Controversial Catechism.
  3. What does Keenan say the words " I fell down to worship," etc., mean?
    By the word " adore "... is not meant the worship due to God but a high degree of veneration, which may be given to God's most exalted creatures.
  4. What do modern Roman writers say?
    That it is Divine worship that is here condemned.
  5. What does this difference show?
    That on an important point of Bible interpretation Roman divines differ.
  6. What makes this so serious?
    They claim that the true interpretation is given to the Church.
  7. What does the angel forbid?
    Falling at his feet to worship him.
  8. What shows that he forbad all religious worship?
    The fact that he thought it sufficient to call himself a fellow-servant in order to forbid external reverence.
  9. What supports this interpretation ?
    The fact that there is an unqualified direction to worship God.
  10. What does this incident teach?
    That the offering of any religious worship to angels is distinctly forbidden.

Additional Texts Mentioned in the Study Questions

Tenth Ten - Text 1
  • Question 2. - In the first year of his reign I Daniel understood by books the number of the years, whereof the word of the LORD came to Jeremiah the prophet, that he would accomplish seventy years in the desolations of Jerusalem.
    Daniel 9., 2.
  • Question 6. - 10. Now when Daniel knew that the writing was signed, he went into his house; and his windows being open in his chamber toward Jerusalem, he kneeled upon his knees three times a day, and prayed, and gave thanks before his God, as he did aforetime.Daniel 6., 10, 13.
  • Question 13. - O LORD, according to all thy righteousness, I beseech thee, let thine anger and thy fury be turned away from thy city Jerusalem, thy holy mountain: because for our sins, and for the iniquities of our fathers, Jerusalem and thy people are become a reproach to all that are about us. Daniel 9., 16.
  • Question 17. - Do not they blaspheme that worthy name by the which ye are called? James 2., 7.
  • Question 25. - To the Lord our God belong mercies and forgivenesses, though we have rebelled against him;
    Daniel 9., 9.
  • Question 28. - 14. Though these three men, Noah, Daniel, and Job, were in it, they should deliver but their own souls by their righteousness, saith the Lord GOD.
    20. Though Noah, Daniel, and Job were in it, as I live, saith the Lord GOD, they shall deliver neither son nor daughter; they shall but deliver their own souls by their righteousness. Ezekiel 14., 14, 20.
  • Question 32. - Then hear thou in heaven thy dwelling place, and forgive, and do, and give to every man according to his ways, whose heart thou knowest; (for thou, even thou only, knowest the hearts of all the children of men;) 1 Kings 8., 39.
  • Question 37. - Confess your faults one to another, and pray one for another, that ye may be healed. The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much. James 5., 16.
  • Question 39. - And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. Luke 18., 13.

  • Tenth Ten - Text 2
  • Question 4. - For we are the circumcision, which worship God in the spirit, and rejoice in Christ Jesus, and have no confidence in the flesh. Phillipians 3., 3.
  • Question 6. - Beware of dogs, beware of evil workers, beware of the concision. Phillipians 3., 2.

  • Tenth Ten - Text 3
  • Question 2. - Is not this the carpenter’s son? is not his mother called Mary? and his brethren, James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas? Matthew 13., 55.
    - Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us? And they were offended at him. Mark 6., 3.
  • Question 3. - Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write unto you of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints. Jude verse 3.
  • Question 6. - 20. But ye, beloved, building up yourselves on your most holy faith, praying in the Holy Ghost, 21. Keep yourselves in the love of God, looking for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ unto eternal life. Jude verses 20 and 21.
  • Question 10. - Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write unto you of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints. Jude verse 3.
  • Question 11. - Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write unto you of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints. Jude verse 3.
  • Question 12. - But, beloved, remember ye the words which were spoken before of the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ; Jude verse 17.
  • Question 20. - These be they who separate themselves, sensual, having not the Spirit. Jude verse 19.

  • Tenth Ten - Text 4
  • Question 9. - Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree: Galatians 3., 13.
  • Question 26. - Then Jesus answered and said, O faithless and perverse generation, how long shall I be with you? how long shall I suffer you? bring him hither to me. Matthew 17., 17.

  • Tenth Ten - Text 5
  • Question 5. - He will swallow up death in victory; and the Lord GOD will wipe away tears from off all faces; and the rebuke of his people shall he take away from off all the earth: for the LORD hath spoken it. Isaiah 25., 8.
  • Question 6. - I will ransom them from the power of the grave; I will redeem them from death: O death, I will be thy plagues; O grave, I will be thy destruction: repentance shall be hid from mine eyes. Hosea 13., 14.
  • Question 8. - 53. For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality. 54. So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. 1 Corinthians 15., 53, 54.
  • Question 20. - For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.
    Romans 6., 23.
  • Question 29. - And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit. 1 Corinthians 15., 45.
  • Question 37. - Behold, I shew you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, 1 Corinthians 15., 51.

  • Tenth Ten - Text 6
  • Question 3. - 23. And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body. 24. For we are saved by hope: but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for? 25. But if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it. Romans 8., 23-25.
  • Question 4. - And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body. Romans 8., 23.
  • Question 7. - Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil; Hebrews 6., 19.

  • Tenth Ten - Text 7
  • Question 5. - The former treatise have I made, O Theophilus, of all that Jesus began both to do and teach, Acts 1., 1.
  • Question 9. - Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us, Luke 1., 1.
  • Question 24. - And some cried one thing, some another, among the multitude: and when he could not know the certainty for the tumult, he commanded him to be carried into the castle. Acts 21., 34.
    - On the morrow, because he would have known the certainty wherefore he was accused of the Jews, he loosed him from his bands, and commanded the chief priests and all their council to appear, and brought Paul down, and set him before them. Acts 22., 30.

  • Tenth Ten - Text 8
  • Question 29. - And Thomas answered and said unto him, My LORD and my God. John 20., 28.
  • Question 33. - This beginning of miracles did Jesus in Cana of Galilee, and manifested forth his glory; and his disciples believed on him. John 2., 11.

  • Tenth Ten - Text 9
  • Question 8. - And there stood up one of them named Agabus, and signified by the Spirit that there should be great dearth throughout all the world: which came to pass in the days of Claudius Caesar. Acts 11., 28.
    - And as we tarried there many days, there came down from Judaea a certain prophet, named Agabus. Acts 21., 10.
    - Let no man deceive you by any means: for that day shall not come, except there come a falling away first, and that man of sin be revealed, the son of perdition; forward 2 Thessalonians 2., 3forward
  • Question 16. - For I know this, that after my departing shall grievous wolves enter in among you, not sparing the flock. Acts 20., 29.
  • Question 17. - 1. This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. 2. For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy, 3. Without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good, 4.Traitors, heady, highminded, lovers of pleasures more than lovers 5. Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away. 6. For of this sort are they which creep into houses, and lead captive silly women laden with sins, led away with divers lusts, 7. Ever learning, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth. 8. Now as Jannes and Jambres withstood Moses, so do these also resist the truth: men of corrupt minds, reprobate concerning the faith. 2 Timothy 3., 1-8.
  • Question 20. - Little children, it is the last time: and as ye have heard that antichrist shall come, even now are there many antichrists; whereby we know that it is the last time. 1 John 2., 18.
  • Question 22. - Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds; Hebrews 1., 2.
  • Question 39. - 2. A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behavior, given to hospitality, apt to teach;
    12. Let the deacons be the husbands of one wife, ruling their children and their own houses well. 1 Timothy 3., 2, 12.

  • Tenth Ten - Text 10
  • Question 2. - I John, who also am your brother, and companion in tribulation, and in the kingdom and patience of Jesus Christ, was in the isle that is called Patmos, for the word of God, and for the testimony of Jesus Christ. Revelation 1., 9.
  • Question 3. - Then saith he to the disciple, Behold thy mother! And from that hour that disciple took her unto his own home. John 19., 26.
  • Question 7. - John to the seven churches which are in Asia: Grace be unto you, and peace, from him which is, and which was, and which is to come; and from the seven Spirits which are before his throne; Revelation 1., 4.

  • Question 9. - Revelation 21 verse 1. And I saw a new heaven and a new earth: for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away; and there was no more sea. 2. And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. 3. And I heard a great voice out of heaven saying, Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them, and be their God. 4. And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away. 5. And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are true and faithful. 6. And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely. 7. He that overcometh shall inherit all things; and I will be his God, and he shall be my son. 8. But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death. 9. And there came unto me one of the seven angels which had the seven vials full of the seven last plagues, and talked with me, saying, Come hither, I will shew thee the bride, the Lamb’s wife. 10. And he carried me away in the spirit to a great and high mountain, and shewed me that great city, the holy Jerusalem, descending out of heaven from God, 11. Having the glory of God: and her light was like unto a stone most precious, even like a jasper stone, clear as crystal; 12. And had a wall great and high, and had twelve gates, and at the gates twelve angels, and names written thereon, which are the names of the twelve tribes of the children of Israel: 13. On the east three gates; on the north three gates; on the south three gates; and on the west three gates. 14. And the wall of the city had twelve foundations, and in them the names of the twelve apostles of the Lamb. 15. And he that talked with me had a golden reed to measure the city, and the gates thereof, and the wall thereof. 16. And the city lieth foursquare, and the length is as large as the breadth: and he measured the city with the reed, twelve thousand furlongs. The length and the breadth and the height of it are equal. 17. And he measured the wall thereof, an hundred and forty and four cubits, according to the measure of a man, that is, of the angel. 18. And the building of the wall of it was of jasper: and the city was pure gold, like unto clear glass. 19. And the foundations of the wall of the city were garnished with all manner of precious stones. The first foundation was jasper; the second, sapphire; the third, a chalcedony; the fourth, an emerald; 20. The fifth, sardonyx; the sixth, sardius; the seventh, chrysolyte; the eighth, beryl; the ninth, a topaz; the tenth, a chrysoprasus; the eleventh, a jacinth; the twelfth, an amethyst. 21. And the twelve gates were twelve pearls: every several gate was of one pearl: and the street of the city was pure gold, as it were transparent glass. 22. And I saw no temple therein: for the Lord God Almighty and the Lamb are the temple of it. 23. And the city had no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it: for the glory of God did lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof. 24. And the nations of them which are saved shall walk in the light of it: and the kings of the earth do bring their glory and honor into it. 25. And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day: for there shall be no night there. 26. And they shall bring the glory and honor of the nations into it. 27. And there shall in no wise enter into it any thing that defileth, neither whatsoever worketh abomination, or maketh a lie: but they which are written in the Lamb's book of life. Revelation 21.

    - Revelation 22 verse 1. And he shewed me a pure river of water of life, clear as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb. 2. In the midst of the street of it, and on either side of the river, was there the tree of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every month: and the leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations. 3. And there shall be no more curse: but the throne of God and of the Lamb shall be in it; and his servants shall serve him: 4. And they shall see his face; and his name shall be in their foreheads. 5. And there shall be no night there; and they need no candle, neither light of the sun; for the Lord God giveth them light: and they shall reign for ever and ever. 6. And he said unto me, These sayings are faithful and true: and the Lord God of the holy prophets sent his angel to shew unto his servants the things which must shortly be done. 7. Behold, I come quickly: blessed is he that keepeth the sayings of the prophecy of this book. Revelation 22., 1-7.

  • Question 17. - But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest room; that when he that bade thee cometh, he may say unto thee, Friend, go up higher: then shalt thou have worship in the presence of them that sit at meat with thee. Luke 14., 10.
  • Question 20. - And I fell at his feet to worship him. And he said unto me, See thou do it not: I am thy fellowservant, and of thy brethren that have the testimony of Jesus: worship God: for the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy. Revelation 19., 10.

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