The One Hundred Texts - Text Set 1 - 2017 Version.
Swanny's
Swaggy's
The One Hundred Texts

Bible studies for an understanding of Reformation Christianity
Text Set 2 -
Questions and Answers


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The Text Study Index.
Text Set 1 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 2 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 3 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 4 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 5 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 6 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 7 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 8 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 9 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 10 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10



THE ONE HUNDRED TEXTS OF THE SOCIETY FOR IRISH CHURCH MISSIONS.

THE SECOND TEN

ROMANS 6., 23.

For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.





For the wages of sin is death; but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. - R.V.

For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. - N.K.J.V.

For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. - E.S.V.

THE SECOND TEN - TEXT 1.

I. - An Earned Evil.
  1. Why does this text begin with "for" ?
    To direct our attention to what goes before.
  2. What statements go before our text?
    (a) The statement that the end of the service of sin is death
    ((Romans 6., 20, 21).
    (b) The statement that the Roman Christians had been made free from sin {(Romans 6., 22))., and had everlasting life as the end of their service for God.
  3. What question at the beginning of the chapter led to the explanation of the two ways and the two ends?
    The question: "Shall we continue in sin that grace may abound"?
  4. How does the apostle Paul show the impossibility of the Christian continuing in sin?
    By pointing out that in our Lord Jesus Christ we died to sin and rose again to a new life.
  5. What duty does this fact lay upon Christians?
    To yield themselves unto God as those that are alive from the dead.
  6. What encouragement is given to believers to yield themselves unto God?
    The fact that sin shall not have dominion over them.
  7. What is meant by saying that sin shall not have dominion over us?
    Sin can no longer invoke God's law to bring us under condemnation, because our Lord Jesus Christ satisfied the demands of law by dying and so paying the penalty for our sin.
  8. How does Paul show that this freedom does not lead to sin?
    He tells us that we became free from sin to become servants of righteousness.
  9. How does our text sum up the argument?
    It tells us, " For the wages," etc.
  10. What is meant by the word "wages" ?
    Value given for work done (See
    Luke 3., 14, soldiers' pay).
  11. Who is said to be the pay-master?
    Sin.
  12. What "wages" does sin pay?
    Death.
  13. What lesson is taught us by speaking of death as wages?
    That death is a due reward of sin.
  14. What three kinds of death are spoken of in Scripture?
    Physical, spiritual, eternal.
  15. What element is common to all these?
    The element of separation.
  16. Show how this belongs to all three.
      (1) Physical death, separation of soul from body.
      (2) Spiritual death, separation of soul from God.
      (3) Eternal death, separation of soul and body from God for all eternity.
  17. What, then, does the first part of our text teach us?
    That by nature and conduct we have earned physical, spiritual, and eternal misery.
II. - An Offered Blessing.
  1. What double contrast is introduced by the word " but" ?
    The contrast between " wages " and " gift," and between " death " and " eternal life."
  2. What is meant by the word "gift"?
    Something freely bestowed without being earned or deserved.
  3. What is R.V. for " the gift of God " ?
    "The free gift of God."
  4. What does the text tell us is " The free gift of God "?
    Eternal life.
  5. How many kinds of life are mentioned in the Bible?
    Physical, spiritual, eternal.
  6. What element is common to all three?
    The element of union.
  7. Show how this belongs to all three?
      (1) Soul and body.
      (2) Soul and God.
      (3) Soul and body in union with God for all eternity.
  8. What is the connection between spiritual life here and eternal life hereafter?
    The one is the beginning which must progress and end in the other.
  9. In what sense may we have eternal life here?
    We get here as God's gift the renewing of our souls, which finds its completion in the redemption of soul and body.
  10. What is required of those who are offered a gift?
    Nothing but to take it.
  11. What does this part of our text teach us?
    That we cannot earn or work for our salvation, but that God gives it to us freely.
III. - The Condition of Life.
  1. Where does God's gift of eternal, life reside?
    In Jesus Christ our Lord.
  2. What is meant by saying eternal life is " in" or " through Jesus Christ our Lord " ?
    That eternal life is only obtained through union with our Lord Jesus Christ.
  3. Why does Paul say that God's free gift is " through Jesus Christ our Lord "?
    To teach us that it is only by the sacrifice of the Lord Jesus that blessing is rendered possible.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What is the contrast made between " eternal life " and " death " ?
    One is spoken of as a " free gift," the other as " wages."
  2. Who are they who receive this " free gift" ?
    Those who are servants of God.
  3. What does the Church of Rome teach about the service of God?
    That it increases our justification and merits grace from God.
  4. What does Paul tell us here?
    That eternal life is a free gift.
  5. How does the Church of Rome teach that we get eternal life?
    First by the sacraments, and then we increase our hold on God by our righteous deeds and merit more and more grace.
  6. Why do we reject such teaching?
    Because Paul tells us "The free gift of God is eternal life."
  7. How else does the text warn us against the idea that our works have their part in securing eternal life?
    By teaching us we obtain it " In Christ Jesus our Lord " (R.V.).
  8. If Paul held Rome's teaching, what should we expect him to say?
    The wages of sin is death, but the wages of righteousness is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.
  9. What, then, does the text teach us about holiness?
    It teaches us that it is a necessary part of eternal life, and is worked in us by the power of God as a free gift purchased for us by our Lord Jesus Christ.
  10. What, then, should be our attitude?
    We should thank God for the power to be holy and yield ourselves to Him to make us holy.


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ROMANS 5., 1, 2.

Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ:
By whom also wo have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of
the glory of God.




Being therefore justified by faith, let us have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ;
Through whom also we have had our access by faith into this grace wherein we stand; and let us rejoice in hope of
the glory of God. - R.V.

Therefore, having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom also we have access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God. - N.K.J.V.

Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.
Through him we have also obtained access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of
the glory of God. - E.S.V.

THE SECOND TEN - TEXT 2.

I. - A Blessed Fact.
  1. Why does this text begin with "therefore"?
    Because it gives us the conclusion of an argument,
  2. What is the apostle Paul's argument?
    That righteousness is imputed to those who believe on the Lord Jesus, Who was delivered for our offences and raised again for our justification.
  3. What does Paul call this blessing in our text ?
    " Being justified,"
  4. What is meant by "being justified"?
    Being treated or dealt with by God as if you were just or righteous (as if you had never sinned).
  5. How does the previous chapter describe " being justified "?
    Having righteousness reckoned or imputed to us.
  6. On what ground does Paul tell us righteousness was reckoned to us?
    On the ground that the Lord Jesus was delivered for our offences, and was raised again for our justification.
  7. What is meant by saying the Lord was raised for our justification?
    It means that our Lord's release from death proved that He had secured justification for those who are in Him.
  8. When are persons justified?
    When they believe.
  9. How is this shown in our text?
    The words " being justified " refer to a definite past act.
  10. How does our text speak of faith in connection with being justified?
    It says we are justified by faith.
  11. What is meant by faith?
    Trust or confidence; taking God at His word.
  12. What is meant by saying we are justified by faith?
    That God, on the ground of Christ's death, frees us, when we believe, from the penalty due to sin.
  13. With what is justification by faith contrasted in the previous chapter?
    Justification by works.
  14. What does this teach us?
    That faith is not the ground of justification, but only the means by which free justification comes to the soul.
  15. With what blessed fact do the words " justified by faith " acquaint us?
    With the fact that what we could not do Christ has done for us, and we can receive it by simple trust.
  16. Why is it impossible to be justified by works?
    Because of our offences against God.
II. - A Glorious Consequence.
  1. Having been justified by faith what result follows?
    We have peace with God.
  2. What is the R.V. for "we have peace, etc." ?
    "Let us have peace," etc
  3. What would the words "let us have peace" mean?
    They would mean, " Our Lord purchased for us full freedom, let its results be realised in a soul at peace with God"
    (compare Hebrews 12., 28).
  4. What great result is here brought before us?
    Peace with God.
  5. What hinders " peace with God " ?
    The sins by which we have offended His holiness.
  6. How does justification enable us to have peace?
    It removes from the presence of God the cause of offence.
  7. How does Paul show us that this is his meaning?
    By adding, " through our Lord Jesus Christ."
  8. What is the difference in saying that we are justified by faith, and that we have peace through our Lord Jesus?
    By by faith we mean on the terms or conditions of faith, " through our Lord Jesus Christ" we mean by the agency and work of our Lord Jesus Christ.
III. - A Way of Access.
  1. What other benefit do we secure through our Lord Jesus Christ?
    Access into grace.
  2. What is meant by "access" ?
    Introduction (especially to a king or to a god). (compare
    (Exodus 19, 4; 1 Peter 3., 18.)
  3. Into what have we access?
    Into grace.
  4. What is meant by grace?
    God's free unmerited favour.
  5. What is meant by access into grace?
    Introduction into a condition of free favour with God. (Or introduction to God towards ; a state of grace as a result.)
  6. What does the apostle Paul add to this fact?
    That we stand in this grace.
  7. What is meant by standing in grace?
    That our position in grace renders us steadfast and secure
    (compare Romans 9., 20).
IV. - A Joyous Hope.
  1. What joyous prospect is before the Christian?
    The glory of God.
  2. What effect has this prospect upon us?
    It causes us to rejoice (to exult, to boast).
  3. What is meant by rejoicing in the hope of the glory of God?
    That on the ground of confidence in coming glory we rejoice (
    (compare Romans 4., 18).
  4. What is meant by hope?
    A well-grounded expectation of coming good. (The expected good for which we hope.)
  5. What is meant by the glory of God?
    The future perfection which God has promised and will perform in us (
    (compare Romans 3., 23).
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What are the great words in our text?
    Justified, Faith, Grace, Hope.
  2. What meaning does the Church of Rome give to " justified" ?
    Made righteous or just.
  3. How do you show this is not Paul's meaning?
    Because he speaks of justification as secured by faith and not by works.
  4. How does the use of the word " grace " further help us?
    It teaches that justification is unmerited.
  5. What great truths are taught by our text?
    That justification is for sinful men, through faith, and gives them at once peace with God and a well-grounded expectation of future glory.


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ACTS 16., 29, 30, 31.

Then he called for a light, and sprang in, and came trembling, and fell down before Paul and Silas,
And brought them out, and said, Sirs, what must I do to be saved ?
And they said, Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved, and thy house.




And he called for lights, and sprang in, and trembling for fear, fell down before Paul and Silas,
And brought them out, and said, Sirs, what must I do to be saved?
And they said, Believe on the Lord Jesus, and thou shalt be saved, thou and thy house. - R.V.

Then he called for a light, ran in, and fell down trembling before Paul and Silas.
And he brought them out and said, "Sirs, what must I do to be saved?"
So they said, "Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved, you and your household." - N.K.J.V.

And the jailer called for lights and rushed in, and trembling with fear he fell down before Paul and Silas.
Then he brought them out and said, "Sirs, what must I do to be saved?"
And they said, "Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved, you and your household." - E.S.V.

THE SECOND TEN - TEXT 3.

I. - Great Fear.
  1. Who was it who called for a light?
    The Philippian jailer.
  2. Of whom had the jailer charge?
    Paul and Silas.
  3. Why had Paul and Silas been put into prison?
    Because they had roused the hatred of some in Philippi.
  4. How did they rouse this hatred?
    They healed a girl with a spirit of divination.
  5. What is meant by a " spirit of divination" ?
    The possession of power to foretell the future - to divine is to foresee coming events.
  6. For what purpose was this spirit of divination used?
    For the purpose of bringing gain to her masters.
  7. How did Paul's healing of the girl stop this?
    An evil spirit left her and she foresaw the future no more. She became like an ordinary person,
  8. What revenge did the girl's masters take?
    They stirred up the multitude against Paul and Silas and induced them to bring Paul and Silas before the magistrates.
  9. What did the magistrates do?
    They commanded Paul and Silas to be beaten and to be cast into the inner prison.
  10. How did Paul and Silas occupy their time?
    They prayed and sang hymns to God.
  11. At what time do we read they prayed and sang hymns?
    About midnight (compare R.V.).
  12. What wonderful thing happened while they were praying and singing?
    There was a great earthquake, the foundations of the prison were shaken, the doors were opened, and everyone's bands were loosed.
  13. In what condition was the jailer when all this happened?
    He was fast asleep.
  14. What sight met his eyes when he awoke?
    The open prison doors.
  15. What did he think?
    That all the prisoners had escaped.
  16. What did he attempt to do?
    To draw his sword and kill himself.
  17. How was he prevented from killing himself?
    Paul called out, " Do thyself no harm: for we are all here."
  18. When the jailer heard Paul what did he do?
    "Then he called for a light," etc.
  19. What evidence did the jailer give that he was very frightened?
    He rushed in " trembling for fear " (R.V.),
  20. What was it that made the jailor so fearful?
    He felt that he was in the presence of divine power.
  21. How is that shown in our text?
    By the fact that he fell down before Paul and Silas and addressed them as " Lords." (See Greek.)
  22. What lesson does this teach us?
    That God leads men to Himself by causing them to fear owing to their sense of sin.
II. - A Great Question.
  1. What question did the jailer put to Paul and Silas?
    "Sirs, what must I do to be saved?"
  2. What does the form of the question show us?
    That the jailer knew he had need of salvation.
  3. How does he show his sense of need?
    He asked "what must I do " (lit. "what is necessary for me to do").
  4. What led the jailer to ask this question of Paul and Silas?
    He may have heard what the maiden said
    (Acts 16.,17). Or more probably his conscience led him to seek help from them.
  5. What is meant by being saved?
    Being delivered from the power and penalty of sin.
  6. With whom has the Gospel message power?
    Only with those who are seeking deliverance.
III. - A Great Answer.
  1. What answer did Paul and Silas give?
    " Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved, and thy house."
  2. What is meant by "Believe"?
    Put your trust in.
  3. What Is meant by "Believe on the Lord Jesus " ?
    To rely upon the Lord and what He has done for us gives the Object of our trust).
  4. What would result from believing?
    The jailer would be saved and his house.
  5. What is meant by a man's house?
    All those connected with him, including his slaves the whole family under one roof, (cf, Lat. familia, which has a wide sense.)
  6. What was meant by saying the jailer's "house" would be saved?
    That his acceptance of the Gospel would bring all who were obliged to follow him under its influence, and therefore under its blessing.
  7. How does the context show this?
    The members of his family were baptised on the jailer's profession.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What condition for salvation is here laid down?
    Only one: Believe.
  2. What question did the jailer ask?
    "What must I do?"
  3. What did the answer convey?
    That he must do nothing, only believe,
  4. What does the Church of Rome tell us we must do?
    We must receive life in the Sacraments and increase our justification by good works.
  5. What does the apostle Paul say?
    "Believe on the Lord Jesus,"
  6. What does our Article xi say?
    "We are accounted righteous before God, only for the merit of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, by Faith, and not for our own works or deservings."
  7. Why do we accept this and reject Rome's teaching?
    Acts xvi., 29. 30, 31.


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GOSPEL of JOHN 14., 13, 14.

And whatsoever ye shall ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.
If ye shall ask any thing in my name, I will do it.




And whatsoever ye shall ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.
If ye shall ask me anything in my name, that will I do. - R.V.

And whatever you ask in My name, that I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.
If you ask anything in My name, I will do it. - N.K.J.V.

Whatever you ask in my name, this I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.
If you ask me anything in my name, I will do it. - E.S.V.

THE SECOND TEN. - TEXT 4.

I. - A Gracious Promise.
  1. To whom were these words spoken?
    To the Apostles.
  2. On what occasion were they spoken?
    In the upper room when Judas had left on his errand of betrayal.
  3. What gave rise to these words?
    Philip's request: "Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us."
  4. What was our Lord's answer?
    "He that hath seen Me hath seen the Father."
  5. What additional proofs of close identity did our Lord give?
      (1) His words, John 14., 10;
      (2) His works, John 14., 11;
      (3) the power He gives His disciples, John 14., 12;
      (4) His ability to answer prayer, John 14., 13.
  6. What lesson can we learn from this?
    That answering prayer is a prerogative that belongs to God.
  7. Why do we say that answering prayer is a prerogative of God ?
    Because God alone has the power and the knowledge to give us what we need.
  8. How does our Lord show His equality with the Father in this text?
    By offering to do for us whatsoever we ask.
  9. What is meant by "whatsoever " ?
    Any kind or class of petition.
  10. What encouragement does this offer us?
    To bring everything in prayer to God.
  11. With what particulars is prayer here connected?
    With doing the works of God (
    John 14., 12).
  12. What may we learn from "whatsoever" in this connection?
    That all that is necessary for us for our work for God will be pro- vided if we look for it.
  13. What obligation does the text lay upon us?
    To ask for our needs.
  14. What special reason have we for asking for blessing in our work?
    The fact that our Lord Jesus Christ has gone unto the Father.
  15. What connection has our Lord's going to the Father with our asking?
    He ever lives to make intercession for us, and He has sent the Spirit to help our prayers.
II. - An Important Condition for True Prayer,
  1. What condition does our Lord lay down for granting prayer?
    That it should be asked in His name.
  2. What is meant by "in My Name"?
    In connection with My Person and work.
  3. What words had our Lord used before that help us to understand "in My Name"?
    "He that believeth in Me,"
  4. What kind of things only can we ask in the Name of our Lord?
    Such things as extend His Kingdom or are done by His authority.
  5. How is this sense given further explanation?
    By the words "that will I do."
  6. What do the words "that will I do" teach us?
    That when we ask in our Lord's Name our will is the same as His, He does what we ask.
  7. How do these words limit our Lord's promise?
    They confine it to that which is according to our Lord's will.
  8. How, then, are we to understand the word whatsoever"?
    As including all worthy and suitable petitions.
  9. How did our Lord lead up to this great thought?
    He tells us He is one with the Father, and whosoever believeth in Him does the same and greater works than He did, and so always asks in His Name.
  10. Why is it that sometimes we ask for wrong things?
    Because our knowledge and faith are not perfect,
    (compare Matthew xv., 8; Mark xi., 24; James i., 6; iv., 3; 1 John v., 14.)
  11. What ought we to do?
    We ought to search carefully what the will of God is.
  12. What ought we to do about uncertain things?
    We ought to follow our Lord, Who prayed, "If it be possible."
III. - A Glorious Reason for Answering Prayer.
  1. What does our Lord say is the object of answering prayer?
    " That the Father may be glorified in the Son."
  2. What Is meant by the word "glorified"?
    Made to appear honourable by a display of His grace and power.
  3. How is the Father "glorified in the Son"?
    The Son grants our petitions and performs those works which are one with the Father's will and purpose
    (compare John 14., 10). We gratefully thank God Who performs our petitions.
  4. What lesson does this saying teach us?
    That all our words and works are designed for God's glory.
  5. How does our Lord seek to encourage us to approach God with our. By adding, " If ye shall ask anything."
  6. What is R.V. for "If ye shall," etc.?
    "If ye shall ask Me anything in My Name, that will I do."
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What do the words "Whatsoever ye shall ask " teach us?
    That God answers every petition addressed to Him through our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning prayer?
    Among other things that it is good and useful suppliantly to invoke the Saints.
  3. On what ground does the Church of Rome say we make our,appeal to Saints?
    On the ground that their, superior holiness enables them to intercede with God for us.
  4. How does this text show us that there is no necessity for this intercession?
    It tells us all petitions can be, and ought to be presented in our Lord's Name.
  5. How does this condition, "in My Name," contradict the idea that the Saints' holiness avails for us?
    By showing that the condition of successful petition lies in our own heart and life.
  6. How does this invocation of Saints dishonour our Lord?
    It is an attempt to rob Him of the glory of answering our petitions and it attributes the glory of God to the saints and not to Him.
  7. On what ground do we reject invocation of saints?
      (1) We are told to ask in our Lord's Name.
      (2) We are promised that He will grant all our petitions.
      (3) The Bible is silent on appeal to saints.


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GOSPEL of JOHN 14., 26.

But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you
all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you.




But the Comforter, even the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you
all things, and bring to your remberance all that I said unto you. - R.V.

But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you
all things, and bring to your remembrance all things that I said to you. - N.K.J.V.

But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you
all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you. - E.S.V.

THE SECOND TEN - TEXT 5.

I. - The Introduction of a Great Person.
  1. Who spoke these words?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. On what occasion were they spoken?
    On the occasion of the address in the Upper Room.
  3. Of what had our Lord been speaking?
    About coming to His disciples and dwelling with them.
  4. What had our Lord said previously about the Holy Spirit?
    See John 14., 16, 17.
  5. What name does our Lord give in these verses to the Holy Spirit?
    The Comforter.
  6. What is the Rhemish rendering for Comforter?
    Paraclete.
  7. What is the meaning of Comforter or Paraclete?
    One who pleads for another on the ground of justice.
  8. How many times is this used in New Testament?
    Five times.
  9. To whom is the word Comforter or Paraclete applied?
    Four times to the Holy Spirit and once to our Lord.
  10. In what text is the word applied to our Lord?
    1 John 2., 1, where the Greek word Paraclete is translated Advocate, (Text IV.- 6, page 166.)
  11. What other meaning besides Advocate may be given to the word Paraclete?
    Helper or Strengthener.
  12. Who is the Comforter here spoken of?
    The Holy Ghost.
  13. Who is the Holy Ghost?
    The Third Person of the Holy Trinity.
  14. What is the R.V, for Holy Ghost?
    Holy Spirit.
  15. What does our Lord here teach us about the Holy Spirit?
    That He is Spirit and is also pre-eminently Holy.
  16. What lessons do we learn from this Name?
    That the Spirit is God and that His wish is to impart, holiness.
  17. What may we learn from the fact that the Holy Spirit is also the Comforter?
    That it is the intention of God to strengthen us in the way of holiness.
II. - The Ground on which He is Sent to Us.
  1. What does our Lord go on to tell us concerning the Holy Spirit?
    That the Father will send Him in the Name of our Lord.
  2. Who is here spoken of as sending the Holy Spirit?
    God the Father.
  3. When was this promise fulfilled?
    On the day of Pentecost.
  4. In whose Name is the Holy Spirit sent?
    In the Name of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  5. What is meant by "In My Name"?
    In connection with My Person and work.
  6. What had our Lord said previously about the Holy Spirit that helps us to understand "In My Name "?
    "I will pray the Father, and He shall give you another Comforter."
  7. What do we learn from the fact that the Holy Spirit is sent in our Lord's Name?
    That it is on account of what our Lord has done for us that we receive the Holy Spirit.
III. - The Mission He Performs for Us.
  1. What does our Lord say is the work of the Spirit?
    To teach all things and bring all things to our remembrance, whatsoever our Lord has said.
  2. To whom was this promise first given?
    To the Apostles.
  3. What leads us to think it is not confined to them?
    Our Lord promised (verse 16) that the Holy Spirit would he with them for ever.
  4. Can you give an instance of the fulfilment of this promise?
    Acts 11., 16; compare Acts 2., 33.
  5. Into what two parts is the work of the Holy Spirit divided?
      (1) Teaching;
      (2) Calling to remembrance what had been spoken.
  6. What is meant by "He shall teach you all things"?
    The Holy Spirit leads God's children into all truths necessary for salvation and holiness.
  7. What special blessing resulted from this promise?
    The writing of the New Testament.
  8. What is the special name of this gift of the Holy Spirit?
    Inspiration.
  9. What do we learn from the use of the pronoun " He"?
    That the Holy Spirit is a real Person.
  10. What special comfort does this text give us?
    It tells us that the person who receives the Spirit is led to know the things of God.
  11. What does this text teach us as to the ground of all knowledge of God?
    It consists in whatsoever our Lord said to us.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What is the Rhemish note on this text?
    "The Holy Ghost is here promised to the Apostles and their successors, particularly, in order to teach them all truth and preserve them from error."
  2. According to this note what preserves the Apostles and their successors, particularly, in order to teach all truth and preserve them from error?
    The gift of the Holy Ghost.
  3. According to the Church of Rome's admission what result would follow from this?
    The laity would also be preserved from error.
  4. How do you show this?
    The note on
    1 John 2., 20, says. "The true children of God partake of the grace of the Holy Ghost promised to the Church and her pastors."
  5. What result would follow from this?
    That instead of directing men to the Pope we should urge them to seek for the Holy Spirit and so be guided into all truth.


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GOSPEL of JOHN 4., 24.

God is a spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth.




God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship in spirit and in truth. - R.V.

"God is Spirit, and those who worship Him must worship in spirit and truth." - N.K.J.V.

"God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth." - E.S.V.

THE SECOND TEN - TEXT 6.

I. - The Nature of God.
  1. By whom were these words spoken?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. To whom were they spoken?
    To the woman of Samaria.
  3. To what statement are these words part of the reply?
    "Our fathers worshipped in this mountain, and ye say Jerusalem is the place where men ought to worship."
  4. How did our Lord answer this implied question?
    John 4., 21, 22, 23, 24.
  5. What error did our Lord condemn?
    The error of confining God to one particular place.
  6. In what respect did the Jews differ from the Samaritans in relation to the local worship of God?
    The Jews worshipped a God who revealed Himself according to His own appointment
    (John 4., 22).
  7. What does this teach us about worship?
    True worship must always be according to the will of God.
  8. What change in worship did our Lord foretell ?
    John 4., 21.
  9. What reason did He give for this change?
    True worship must be in spirit and in truth.
  10. How does our text support this truth?
    It tells us God is a Spirit.
  11. What is meant by saying "God is a Spirit"?
    That God in His own nature is Spirit and not matter.
  12. What is meant by saying "God in His nature is Spirit"?
    God has no body and is confined to no place. God is true and holy and wise and powerful.
  13. How does our Article I, teach this lesson?
    " There is but one living and true God, everlasting, without body, parts, or passions; of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness,"
  14. From what part of us do we get the best idea of God?
    From our soul.
  15. What are the characteristics of the soul?
    The soul is invisible and cannot be touched, yet it thinks and wills.
  16. What do we call the great power the soul possesses?
    The power of reason.
  17. How does our Lord teach us to look upon the Father?
    As the Great Eternal Reason.
  18. What effect has this teaching on our worship?
    It makes it impossible for us to confine worship to any one place.
  19. What three characteristics belong to God as pure Eternal Spirit?
    Omniscience, Omnipresence, Omnipotence.
II. - The Obligation of Worship.
  1. What should we render to God?
    Worship.
  2. What is meant by the word worship?
    The expression of reverence, honour and adoration.
  3. How does our Lord enforce the duty of worship?
    He says the Father seeketh true worshippers.
  4. How else is the obligation to worship suggested?
    Our Lord takes it for granted that once it is known that God is Spirit the instinct of worship will arise. (They that worship must worship in spirit and in truth.)
III. - The Conditions of True Worship.
  1. What does our Lord teach concerning the manner of worship?
    "They that worship Him must worship Him in spirit and in truth."
  2. What is meant by they must worship Him in spirit and in truth?
    That such a mode of worship is enjoined by God and necessary if our worship is to be accepted.
  3. What is meant by worshipping in spirit?
    Worship with the highest part of man's being, his spirit.
  4. How can we worship In spirit?
    By offering to God the reverence and devotion of our reason and will.
  5. How does Paul describe reasonable service?
    See
    Romans 12., 1.
  6. What does our Lord here teach us?
    That outward devotion, if acceptable to God, must be a true expression of this inward service of the mind.
  7. What is meant by worshipping "in truth"?
    Worshipping according to reality.
  8. How can we worship according to reality?
    By knowing what God is, and by rendering proper honour to Him sincerely.
  9. How can we know what God is?
    By studying His own revelation of Himself in His Word.
  10. With what is worship "in spirit" contrasted?
    With the local, ceremonial worship which lacked any spiritual power.
  11. With what is worship " in truth " contrasted?
    With the falsely devised worship of the Samaritans, which lacked any Divine approval or command.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. How does the Church of Rome offend against this text?
    She localises worship.
  2. In what way does the Church of Rome localise worship?
    She directs special reverence to be paid to our Lord, who is supposed to dwell in a special manner in the Tabernacle.
  3. What is the Tabernacle?
    The receptacle over the altar in Roman Churches in which the Reserved Host is kept.
  4. In what other way does the Church of Rome offend?
    She attaches peculiar sanctity to special places, pictures, shrines, etc., as Lourdes; the apostle Peter's, Rome; The Holy Coat at Treves, etc.
  5. How does the Church of Rome introduce formalism into worship?
    By assigning a particular value to .the repetition of particular prayers a stated number of times (The Rosary, etc.)
  6. How does she offend against worship in truth?
    By importing into worship the use of images, the adoration of the Cross, etc.


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2 TIMOTHY 3., 15.

And that from a child thou hast known the holy scriptures, which are able to make thee wise
unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus.




And that from a babe thou hast known the sacred writings, which are able to make thee wise
unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. - R.V.

And that from childhood you have known the Holy Scriptures, which are able to make you wise
for salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. - N.K.J.V.

And how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings, which are able to make you wise
for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus. - E.S.V.

THE SECOND TEN - TEXT 7.

I. - An Early Student.
  1. To whom were these words written?
    To Timothy.
  2. What do we know about Timothy?
    Acts 16., 1, 2,
  3. Concerning what has the apostle Paul been warning Timothy?
    2 Timothy 3., 1 - 4.
  4. What remedy does he suggest to Timothy against these dangers?
    2 Timothy 3., 10 and 14.
  5. How would 2 Timothy 3., 10 and 11 encourage Timothy?
    By giving him fresh confidence in the power of God to deliver.
  6. How would 2 Timothy 3., 14 assist him?
    By recalling to his mind the foundation on which he built,
  7. How does Paul refer to Timothy's teachers?
    "Knowing of whom thou hast learned them,"
    2 Timothy 3., 14.
  8. What special benefit was there in the fact?
    It enabled Timothy to recall the effect of these truths in the minds, and conduct of those who taught him.
  9. What do we learn from this?
    To listen with increased respect to those who show the power of God in their lives,
  10. How does Paul refer more particularly to the faith of Timothy's teachers?
    2 Timothy 1,, 5.
  11. Who then were his teachers?
    His grandmother, Lois; and his mother, Eunice.
    2 Timothy 1., 5.
  12. What do we learn from this?
    That God wills that His Holy Word should be taught in the home.
    See
    Deuteronomy 6., 6, 7. (Text VII. - 8, see page 332.)
  13. When did Timothy begin to know the Holy Scriptures?
    From his early childhood.
  14. What is R.V. for " from a child " ?
    " From a babe." Rhemish reads " from thy infancy."
  15. What benefit does Paul attach to this early study?
    It made it easier for Timothy to abide in what he had learned.
  16. What lesson does this teach us?
    The duty and advantage of early knowledge of the Scriptures.
II. - An Important Study.
  1. What was the object of Timothy's early study?
    The Holy Scriptures.
  2. What is R.V. for Holy Scriptures?
    "Sacred writings";
    2 Corinthians 3., 6, 7; Galatians 6,. 11; Acts 28,. 21.
  3. What " Sacred writings " did Timothy learn?
    The Old Testament.
  4. What is meant by speaking of the Old Testament, as "Sacred writings"?
    That they are Writings connected with holy or consecrated persons and things.
  5. What is the importance to us of speaking of the Writings as sacred?
    To enable us to rest securely in God's Word Written as His own message.
III. - A Blessed Result.
  1. What does Paul write that the Holy Scriptures are able to do?
    They are able to make wise unto salvation.
  2. What may we learn from this as to the object of God's Word?
    Its object is to lead us to Salvation.
  3. How are we led to Salvation?
    By the study of the Scriptures which makes us wise.
  4. What is meant by "making wise" ?
    To acquaint us with God's will by instruction.
  5. What is meant by " Salvation " ?
    Putting away the punishment due to sin and bringing into eternal life.
  6. Why does this power belong to the Sacred writings?
    Because they come from God and He is the Author of Salvation.
IV. - An Appointed Medium.
  1. How do the Scriptures exercise this power?
    Through faith.
  2. What is meant by faith?
    Trust - taking God at His Word.
  3. How do the Scriptures make us wise through faith?
    When we receive them as God's message they lead us to full trust in Him.
  4. How does this text teach us that Salvation is obtained?
    By reliance upon God, Who reveals Himself through His Written Word.
  5. Who is the final Object of faith?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  6. What does Paul mean by "faith which is in Christ Jesus"?
    That the Old Testament message finds its completion in our Lord Jesus Christ and prepares us to trust in Him.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does this text teach us about the use of the Sacred Writings?
    That they were used to teach children.
  2. Who were Timothy's teachers?
    His grandmother and his mother.
  3. . What does this teach us about godly Jews?
    That they possessed and read the Scriptures in their own homes.
  4. What saying about the Scriptures did the Pope condemn?
    " The reading of the Holy Scriptures is for all."
  5. When was that condemnation issued?
    In the Syllabus by Pope Pius IX, 1866.
  6. How does our text contradict this teaching?
    It shows that godly matrons had the Bible and used it.
  7. What duty does the text impose?
    The duty of seeing that the Bible is taught in the home.


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EPHESIANS 2., 8, 9, 10.

For by grace are ye saved through, faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:
Not of works, lest any man should boast.
For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works,
which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.




For by grace have ye been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:
Not of works, that no man should glory
For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works,
which God afore prepared that we should walk in them. - R.V.

For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God,
not of works, lest anyone should boast.
For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works,
which God prepared beforehand that we should walk in them. - N.K.J.V.

For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God,
not a result of works, so that no one may boast.
For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works,
which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them. - E.S.V.

THE SECOND TEN - TEXT 8.

I. - The Reality of Grace.
  1. Why does this text begin with "For"?
    To give a reason for what goes before.
  2. To what passage going before does the text especially refer?
    To
    Ephesians 2., 5, particularly the concluding clause.
  3. What has the apostle Paul been speaking about that led him to say, "by grace are ye saved,"?
    The rich mercy of God,
  4. How was God's rich mercy displayed?
    Ephesians 2., 5, 6 and 7.
  5. What word sums up all these benefits?
    "Salvation," "Saved."
  6. What is the meaning of "are saved"?
    Are delivered from the punishment due to sin and brought into eternal life.
  7. What is Revised Version for "are ye saved"?
    " Have ye been saved."
  8. To what time do the words " have been saved " refer?
    To the time when the Ephesians were first brought to the knowledge of our Lord.
  9. What does this teach us about salvation?
    That in one aspect it can be a definite past experience.
  10. What inquiry ought this fact induce us to make?
    An inquiry as to whether we really " have been saved,"
  11. By what does Paul say we are saved?
    By Grace.
  12. What is meant by "Grace"?
    God's unmerited favour.
  13. Who are meant by the word "ye"?
    The Ephesians who believed in the Lord Jesus Christ.
  14. How is their former condition described?
    "Dead in trespasses and sins."
  15. How does that fact illustrate the truth that they were saved by grace?
    It shows that they as dead persons could contribute nothing towards the new life.
  16. What word is used to describe restoration to spiritual life?
    Quickening.
  17. What is meant by quickening?
    Making alive.
  18. How does the use of the word "quickening" teach us that we are saved by grace?
    It makes the first step in salvation an act of Divine Power.
II. - The Condition of Salvation.
  1. Through what does Paul say we are saved?
    Through faith.
  2. What is meant by faith?
    Trust, confidence, taking God at His word.
  3. What is meant by saying we are saved "through faith " ?
    By means of faith we receive the blessings of the Gospel.
  4. What do we learn from this fact?
    That each one must receive the Gospel offer individually.
  5. How do the words "have ye been saved" help us to understand this They show that the Ephesians knew that they had thus received the Gospel.
III. - The Exclusion of Human Merit.
  1. What words does Paul add?
    "And that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: not of works lest any man should boast."
  2. To what does "and that" refer?
    To the whole process of salvation.
  3. What great contrasts are given in the text?
    It is not of yourselves but of God: not of works but of faith.
  4. What is meant by saying "not of yourselves"?
    That no movement or merit of ours apart from God's work procured it.
  5. What is meant by saying "not of works"?
    Not by means of any righteousness which we possess.
  6. How does Paul still further show that we owe all to grace?
    By adding that no man can boast.
  7. How can we sum up this teaching?
    We owe everything to God's favour; nothing to our own works when we receive the gift by faith there is no room for boasting!
IV. - The Effect of God's Workmanship.
  1. Repeat Ephesians 2., 10 "For we are," etc,
  2. How does that prove that we owe all to God's grace?
    It teaches that we cannot please God until He creates us anew.
  3. When can we do good works pleasing to God?
    When in Christ Jesus we are created for that purpose.
  4. What is meant by "created in Christ Jesus"?
    In relation to our Lord's work for us as we are made anew
    (compare Ephesians 2., 15).
  5. What is meant by saying "unto good works"?
    That the purpose of the new life is to make us workers of God's will.
  6. How do the last words of the text strengthen this meaning?
    By teaching (hat the Christian's work was made ready beforehand by God. It is contained in the salvation wrought out for us by our Lord Jesus Christ.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning good works?
    That they increase our justification and make our faith perfect.
  2. What does the Church of Rome teach about faith?
    That it is only the commencement of justification.
  3. How does our text contradict Rome's teaching?
    By showing that we receive God's grace by means of faith, but this faith has no merit in itself.
    (Compare Notes.
    Romans 5., Ephesians 2., 1, 2., page 55. Article XI. - "Of the Justification of Man" - "Not of our own works or deservings."


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ACTS IV. 12.

Neither is there salvation in any other: for there
is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved.




And in none other is there salvation: for neither is there
any other name under heaven, that is given among men, wherein we must be saved. - R.V.

"Nor is there salvation in any other, for there
is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved." - N.K.J.V.

"And there is salvation in no one else, for there
is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved." - E.S.V.

THE SECOND TEN - TEXT 9.

I. - An Exclusive Message.
  1. To whom were these words spoken?
    To the rulers, elders, scribes, and the High Priest with his kindred.
  2. What was the occasion on which they were spoken?
    When Peter and John had been arrested for preaching.
  3. To whom had Peter and John been preaching?
    To the multitude that came together owing to the healing of the lame man.
  4. Why did the priests interfere?
    They were grieved because Peter and John spoke of the resurrection of the dead.
  5. What lesson does this teach us?
    That religious leaders sometimes miss the truth.
  6. What question did the elders of the Jews ask Peter and John?
    " By what power, or by what name have ye done this?"
    (Acts 4., 7.)
  7. Who answered the question?
    Peter.
  8. What answer did he give?
    That it was by the Name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom they had crucified.
  9. What Old Testament passage did Peter quote?
    (Psalm 118., 22 (see Acts 4., 11).
  10. What did the apostle Peter then say about our Lord?
    " Neither is there," etc.
  11. What effect had Peter's speech?
    It made them marvel at the boldness of Peter and John.
  12. What lesson does this teach us?
    That we should never be afraid to speak the truth about our blessed Lord.
  13. What is Revised Version for "Neither is there salvation"?
    " And in none other is there salvation."
  14. What is meant by "in none other is there salvation"?
    That of all the beings on earth or in heaven there is not one who can save us but our Lord Jesus Christ. (Greek - none of many.)
  15. How does Peter still further enforce this lesson?
    He says, "There is none other name under heaven .... whereby we must be saved." (Greek - no different name, not one of two.)
  16. How does that add force to what he had previously said?
    It is as if He said, "There is in none other salvation, not even in one other of all the beings in the world."
  17. What great lesson does this teach us?
    That if we are saved we must be saved by our Lord Jesus Christ,
  18. What gift does Peter say is in our Lord alone?
    Salvation.
  19. What is salvation?
    Putting away the punishment due to sin and bringing us into eternal life.
  20. What are the three parts of salvation?
    Justification, Sanctification, Glorification.
II. - An All-Powerful Name.
  1. What does Peter say is given "whereby we must be saved "?
    The Name of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. What is meant by the Name of any person?
    The character and work of any person.
  3. What Old Testament incident helps us to understand the meaning of the word Name?
    God's revelation to Moses,
    Exodus 34., 5, et seq.
  4. What is meant by "none other name . . . given"?
    There is no one else who has the character and qualifications of a Saviour.
  5. To what special qualities of our Lord had Peter already referred?
    To the fact that He had been crucified and had risen again from the dead.
  6. What is meant by a name "under heaven"? In the whole world covered by the expanse of heaven.
    (compare Acts 2., 5; Colosians 1., 23).
  7. Why are all these expressions heaped together?
    To remove any lingering idea that anyone can do anything for our salvation except our Lord Jesus.
  8. What is meant by saying that the Name is "given among men "?
    That our Lord's power is available for men and is offered to them.
  9. What do we learn from this use of the word "given"?
    That the salvation in our Lord is not something invented by man, but something revealed by God.
III. - An Ever-present Need.
  1. For what purpose is our Lord's Name given among men?
    In order that we may be saved.
  2. What is the Revised Version for "whereby"?
    "Wherein."
  3. What is meant by saying "Wherein we must be saved "?
    That it is in connection with our Lord's divine power and work that salvation comes.
  4. How does Peter lay stress upon the fact that the name of Christ is essential for salvation?
    He says we must be saved in His Name or by His Name.
  5. What is meant by saying we must be saved?
    That God's purpose of salvation is unalterably fixed in Christ.
  6. What lesson is here taught?
    That trust in any other way of salvation is altogether vain.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What is the one necessity of salvation?
    That it be in the Name of our Lord.
  2. What necessity does Rome add?
    Union with the Pope.
  3. Of what sin is she thus guilty?
    Of the sin of putting another name beside that of our Lord Jesus.
  4. How does our text condemn all such teaching?
    "Neither is there salvation," etc.be saved in His Name or by His Name.


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The GOSPEL of LUKE 1., 46, 47.

And Mary said,
My soul doth magnify the Lord.
And my spirit hath, rejoiced in God my Saviour.




And Mary said,
My soul doth magnify the Lord,
And my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour. - R.V.

And Mary said:
"My soul magnifies the Lord,
And my spirit has rejoiced in God my Savior." - N.K.J.V.

And Mary said,
"My soul magnifies the Lord,
and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior," - E.S.V.

THE SECOND TEN - TEXT 10.

I. - A Holy Singer.
  1. Who spoke these words?
    Mary " the mother of Jesus ".
  2. What is this song called?
    The Magnificat.
  3. What is the meaning of the Magnificat} Magnify, or make great.
  4. Why is this song so called?
    Because it opens with the words "My soul doth magnify."
  5. On what occasion do we sing the Magnificat?
    At Evening Prayer after the First Lesson.
  6. What led Mary to utter this hymn of praise?
    The fact that she was chosen of God to be the mother of our Saviour.
  7. Who first heard this hymn?
    Elizabeth, Mary's cousin and the mother of John the Baptist.
  8. What made it natural for Mary to seek out Elizabeth at this time?
    Elizabeth also, by an angel, had been promised a son.
  9. Who received this message about Elizabeth?
    Her husband, Zacharias.
  10. How did Elizabeth show it was a great honour to be visited by Mary?
    (Luke 1., verse 43.)
  11. How does Mary refer to the honour placed on her?
    (Luke 1., verse 48.)
  12. What does this teach us?
    That we should always hold Mary " the mother of Jesus " in the greatest respect.
  13. How is Mary usually described in the New Testament?
    As Mary "the mother of Jesus" (or "His mother" )
II. - A Great Theme.
  1. To whom does Mary address her song?
    To God.
  2. What are her opening words?
    "My soul doth magnify the Lord."
  3. What does " magnify " mean?
    To make great or large.
  4. In what sense can God be made great?
    Only in the sense of making men see His greatness.
  5. What is meant by "My soul doth magnify" ?
    That Mary in her soul exalted God.
  6. How do we exalt God in our souls?
    By remembering His goodness and praising Him for it.
  7. How does Mary herself explain her meaning?
    By adding "My spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour."
  8. What fact above all others leads us to magnify God?
    The fact that He is a Saviour.
  9. What is meant by "My spirit hath rejoiced " ?
    My inner nature exults, is full of gladness. (literalry: to leap very much. Suggest raptureas a good word.)
  10. How may our spirits be full of joy?
    By accepting Christ as our Saviour
    (Acts 8., 5-8; 16., 34).
III. - An Insight into Our Being.
  1. What does Mary mean by " soul" and " spirit" ?
    The inner and higher part of man.
  2. What lesson does the use of these words teach us?
    That we have a spiritual as well as a bodily nature;
  3. What does Paul call our spiritual nature?
    The inward man
    (2 Corinthian 4,, 16).
  4. What are we taught here about "the inward man " ?
    That through it we can praise God and rejoice in Him.
  5. What lesson does this teach us?
    That we are made for God and find our highest life in Him.
IV. - An Important Confession.
  1. How does Mary say we can specially rejoice in God?
    As the One who saves us.
  2. What does this teach us?
    That we stand in need of a Deliverer.
  3. What led Mary to think especially of God as a Saviour?
    The promise that God would give the throne of David to her Son.
  4. How did that promise turn her thoughts to salvation?
    It revealed to her that her Son was to be the promised Messiah.
  5. What great truth do her words teach?
    That God, and God only, is the Author of Salvation.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. Where does Mary place herself?
    Amongst the number of those who were looking for salvation.
  2. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning Mary?
    That she was conceived Immaculate,
  3. What is meant by the Immaculate Conception?
    That Mary " the mother of Jesus " was conceived and born without spot or stain of original sin.
  4. How do her words here contradict that idea?
    They show her placing herself with all mankind as needing a Saviour.
  5. Who are they who need a Saviour?
    Those who are in the state or condition of sin,
  6. Who are those who rejoice in God the Saviour?
    Those who are conscious that God has put away their sin.
  7. What does this text teach us about Mary " the mother of Jesus "?
    That she felt her need and rejoiced in God's deliverance from sin.



Additional Texts Mentioned in the Study Questions

Second Ten - Text 1
  • Question 2. For when ye were the servants of sin, ye were free from righteousness. What fruit had ye then in those things whereof ye are now ashamed? for the end of those things is death. Romans 6., 20, 21.
    But now being made free from sin, and become servants to God, ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life. Romans 6., 22.
  • Question 10. And the soldiers likewise demanded of him, saying, And what shall we do? And he said unto them, Do violence to no man, neither accuse any falsely; and be content with your wages. Luke 3., 14.

  • Second Ten - Text 2
  • Question 19. Wherefore we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear: (compare Hebrews 12., 28).
  • Question 26. Ye have seen what I did unto the Egyptians, and how I bare you on eagles' wings, and brought you unto myself. Exodus 19., 4.
    For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit: 1 Peter 3., 18.
  • Question 31. For when ye were the servants of sin, ye were free from righteousness. Romans 6., 20.
  • Question 34. Who against hope believed in hope, that he might become the father of many nations, according to that which was spoken, So shall thy seed be. Romans 4., 18.
  • Question 36. For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; Romans 3., 23.

  • Second Ten - Text 3
  • Question 26. The same followed Paul and us, and cried, saying, These men are the servants of the most high God, which shew unto us the way of salvation. Acts 16., 17.
  • Question 42. Then he called for a light, and sprang in, and came trembling, and fell down before Paul and Silas, And brought them out, and said, Sirs, what must I do to be saved? And they said, Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved, and thy house. Acts 16., 29, 30, 31.

  • Second Ten - Text 4
  • Question 5. 10 Do you not believe that I am in the Father, and the Father in Me? The words that I speak to you I do not speak on My own authority; but the Father who dwells in Me does the works.
    11 Believe Me that I am in the Father and the Father in Me, or else believe Me for the sake of the works themselves.
    12 "Most assuredly, I say to you, he who believes in Me, the works that I do he will do also; and greater works than these he will do, because I go to My Father. John 14., 10-12.
  • Question 11. "Most assuredly, I say to you, he who believes in Me, the works that I do he will do also; and greater works than these he will do, because I go to My Father. John 14., 12.
  • Question 25. This people draweth nigh unto me with their mouth, and honoreth me with their lips; but their heart is far from me. Matthew 15., 8.
    Therefore I say unto you, What things soever ye desire, when ye pray, believe that ye receive them, and ye shall have them. Mark 11., 24.
    But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed. James 1., 6.
    Ye ask, and receive not, because ye ask amiss, that ye may consume it upon your lusts. James 4., 3.
    And this is the confidence that we have in him, that, if we ask any thing according to his will, he heareth us: 1 John 5., 14.
  • Question 30. Believest thou not that I am in the Father, and the Father in me? the words that I speak unto you I speak not of myself: but the Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works. John 14., 10.

  • Second Ten - Text 5
  • Question 4. And I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you for ever; Even the Spirit of truth; whom the world cannot receive, because it seeth him not, neither knoweth him: but ye know him; for he dwelleth with you, and shall be in you. John 14., 16, 17.
  • Question 10. My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous: 1 John 2., 1.
  • Question 28. Then remembered I the word of the Lord, how that he said, John indeed baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost. Acts 11., 16.
    Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear. Acts 2., 33.
  • Question 39. But ye have an unction from the Holy One, and ye know all things. 1 John 2., 20.

  • Second Ten - Text 6
  • Question 4. Jesus saith unto her, Woman, believe me, the hour cometh, when ye shall neither in this mountain, nor yet at Jerusalem, worship the Father. Ye worship ye know not what: we know what we worship: for salvation is of the Jews. But the hour cometh, and now is, when the true worshippers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth: for the Father seeketh such to worship him. God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth. John 4., 21-24.
  • Question 6. Ye worship ye know not what: we know what we worship: for salvation is of the Jews. John 4., 22.
  • Question 8. Jesus saith unto her, Woman, believe me, the hour cometh, when ye shall neither in this mountain, nor yet at Jerusalem, worship the Father. John 4., 21.
  • Question 28. I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service. Romans 12., 1.

  • Second Ten - Text 7
  • Question 2. Then came he to Derbe and Lystra: and, behold, a certain disciple was there, named Timotheus, the son of a certain woman, which was a Jewess, and believed; but his father was a Greek: Which was well reported of by the brethren that were at Lystra and Iconium. Act 16., 1, 2.
  • Question 3. This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy, Without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good, Traitors, heady, highminded, lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God; 2 Timothy 3., 1-4.
  • Question 4. But thou hast fully known my doctrine, manner of life, purpose, faith, longsuffering, charity, patience, 3:14 But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned them; 2 Timothy 3., 10, 14.
  • Question 6. But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned them; 2 Timothy 3., 14.
  • Question 7. But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned them; 2 Timothy 3., 14.
  • Question 10. When I call to remembrance the unfeigned faith that is in thee, which dwelt first in thy grandmother Lois, and thy mother Eunice; and I am persuaded that in thee also. 2 Timothy 1., 5.
  • Question 11. When I call to remembrance the unfeigned faith that is in thee, which dwelt first in thy grandmother Lois, and thy mother Eunice; and I am persuaded that in thee also. 2 Timothy 1., 5.
  • Question 12. And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up. Deuteronomy 6., 6, 7.
  • Question 18. Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit: for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life. But if the ministration of death, written and engraven in stones, was glorious, so that the children of Israel could not stedfastly behold the face of Moses for the glory of his countenance; which glory was to be done away: 2 Corinthians 3., 6, 7.
    Ye see how large a letter I have written unto you with mine own hand. Galatians 6., 11.
    And they said unto him, We neither received letters out of Judaea concerning thee, neither any of the brethren that came shewed or spake any harm of thee. Acts 28., 21.

  • Second Ten - Text 8
  • Question 2. Even when we were dead in sins, hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved;) Ephesians 2., 5.
  • Question 4. Even when we were dead in sins, hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved;) And hath raised us up together, and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus: That in the ages to come he might shew the exceeding riches of his grace in his kindness toward us through Christ Jesus. Ephesians 2., 5-7.
  • Question 31. For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them. Ephesians 2., 10.
  • Question 34. Having abolished in His flesh the enmity, that is, the law of commandments contained in ordinances, so as to create in Himself one new man from the two, thus making peace, Ephesians 2., 15.
  • Question 39. Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ: By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God. Romans 5., 1, 2.
    And you He made alive, who were dead in trespasses and sins, In which you once walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit who now works in the sons of disobedience.
    Ephesians 2., 1, 2.

  • Second Ten - Text 9
  • Question 6. And when they had set them in the midst, they asked, By what power, or by what name, have ye done this? Acts 4., 7.
  • Question 9. The stone which the builders refused is become the head stone of the corner. Psalm 118., 22.
    And when they had set them in the midst, they asked, By what power, or by what name, have ye done this? Acts 4., 11.
  • Question 23. And the LORD descended in the cloud, and stood with him there, and proclaimed the name of the LORD. Exodus 34., 5.
  • Question 26. And there were dwelling at Jerusalem Jews, devout men, out of every nation under heaven. Acts 2., 5.
    If ye continue in the faith grounded and settled, and be not moved away from the hope of the gospel, which ye have heard, and which was preached to every creature which is under heaven; whereof I Paul am made a minister; Colossians 1., 23.

  • Second Ten - Text 10
  • Question 10. And whence is this to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? Luke 1., 43.
  • Question 11. For he hath regarded the low estate of his handmaiden: for, behold, from henceforth all generations shall call me blessed. Luke 1., 48.
  • Question 23. Then Philip went down to the city of Samaria, and preached Christ unto them. And the people with one accord gave heed unto those things which Philip spake, hearing and seeing the miracles which he did. For unclean spirits, crying with loud voice, came out of many that were possessed with them: and many taken with palsies, and that were lame, were healed. And there was great joy in that city. Acts 8., 5-8.
    And when he had brought them into his house, he set meat before them, and rejoiced, believing in God with all his house. Acts 16., 34.
  • Question 26. For which cause we faint not; but though our outward man perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by day. 2 Corinthians 4., 16.

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