The One Hundred Texts - Text Set 1 - 2017 Version.
Swanny's
Swaggy's
The One Hundred Texts

Bible studies for an understanding of Reformation Christianity
Text Set 3 -
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The Text Study Index.
Text Set 1 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 2 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 3 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 4 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 5 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 6 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 7 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 8 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 9 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 10 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


THE ONE HUNDRED TEXTS OF THE SOCIETY FOR IRISH CHURCH MISSIONS.

THE THIRD TEN

PSALM 51. 5.

Behold, I was shapen in iniquity; and in sin did my mother conceive me,




Behold, I was shapen in iniquity; and in sin did my mother conceive me, - R.V.

Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, And in sin my mother conceived me. - N.K.J.V.

Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, and in sin did my mother conceive me. - E.S.V.

THE Third TEN - TEXT 1.

I.- A Penetrating Acknowledgment.
  1. Who spoke these words?
    David.
  2. What led him to give utterance to them?
    The solemn accusation of the prophet Nathan.
  3. What does David ask from God?
    Mercy and the blotting out of his transgressions.
  4. On what does he base his plea?
    On the fact that he acknowledged (or knew) his transgressions.
  5. What do we call this acknowledgment?
    Conviction of sin.
  6. What do we learn from David's acknowledgment?
    That it is only when our hearts are touched by the Holy Spirit that we know we are sinners.
  7. How did David show the depth of his conviction?
    He said, "My sin is ever before me"
    (Psalm 51., 3).
  8. In what light did he regard his sin?
    As an evil done against God.
  9. How is this aspect of sin described in Romans 3., 23?
    As a coming short of the glory of God. (Note, page 3)
  10. How does David first describe sin against God?
    As doing that which is evil in His sight
    (Psalm 51., 4).
  11. What does this teach us about the world of God's Spirit?
    That He often begins by calling a particular sin to remembrance.
  12. How do I recognise that I have done that which is evil?
    My awakened conscience condemns me.
  13. What does David add to the words, "I have done that which is evil in Thy sight " ?
    Psalm 51., 5.
  14. What did he mean by "I was shapen in iniquity"?
    That he was sinful from the very time he took his being.
  15. What is meant by "In sin did my mother conceive me " ?
    The evil nature was common to him and the mother who gave him birth.
  16. What does, David mean by this confession?
    He means that he sees himself bad through and through, not only in act but in nature.
  17. How do we express this in the General Confession?
    "There is no health (wholeness) in us."
II. - A Deep-seated Evil.
  1. Where, then, does David place his sinfulness?
    In his nature.
  2. What does this teach us?
    That our sinful acts are the results of a deeper evil.
  3. Where does this evil reside?
    In the soul or heart.
  4. How does David show this?
    By the words, "Thou desirest truth in the inward parts."
  5. What does the fact we were "shapen in iniquity" teach us?
    That we cannot reform ourselves.
  6. How does David show that this is the condition of all mankind?
    By adding, "In sin did my mother conceive me."
  7. How does this teach us that the sinful nature is common to all?
    It makes it a fact belonging to the manner of our birth.
  8. How does our Article ix. express this?
    "It is the fault and corruption of the Nature of every man, that naturally is engendered of the offspring of Adam; whereby man is very far gone from original righteousness, and is of his own nature inclined to evil."
  9. What effect had this experience on David?
    It made him long for cleansing and inner purity.
  10. What does this fact teach us?
    That apart from God's power our case is hopeless.
III. - A Cry for Renewal.
  1. With what object did David utter this confession?
    With the object of getting a new heart from God.
  2. How does he express his confidence in God's power to save him?
    Psalm 51., 7-10.
  3. What word does he use which shows that God only could deal with his sinful nature?
    The word "create."
  4. What does the use of this word "create" teach us?
    That nothing avails but an entirely new creature.
  5. How does he express his confidence that this renewal will be accomplished in him?
    He says, "A broken and a contrite heart, O God, Thou wilt not despise."
  6. What lesson does this teach us?
    That a deep sense of sin is a cause of hope, not ot despair.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. To what does David trace his sinful act?
    To an inherited sinful nature.
  2. What do the words, "I was shapen in iniquity, teach us from this standpoint?
    That all who have a place in our race share in the taint of sin.
  3. What great fact concerning sin does this bring out?
    That it is inherent and universal.
  4. What exception does the Church of Rome make?
    An exception in favour of Mary, the mother of Christ.
  5. When was the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of Mary, the mother of Christ decreed?
    In December, 1854.
  6. How does David here warn us against such an idea?
    By teaching that it is true of himself as a man "In sin did my mother conceive me."
  7. How does the lesson of our text contradict Rome's teaching on the Immaculate Conception?
    By showing that a sinful racc can only produce sinful members.


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The GOSPEL of JOHN 3., 3.

Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee,
Except a man he born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.




Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee,
Except a man be born anew, he cannot see the kingdom of God. - R.V.

Jesus answered and said to him, "Most assuredly, I say to you,
unless one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God." - N.K.J.V.

Jesus answered him, "Truly, truly, I say to you,
unless one is born again he cannot see the kingdom of God." - E.S.V.

THE THIRD TEN - TEXT 2.

I. - An Inquirer Answered.
  1. To whom were these words spoken?
    To Nicodemus.
  2. What are we told about Nicodemus?
    John 3., 1.
  3. What brought Nicodemus to our Lord Jesus Christ?
    John 3., 2.
  4. To what are the words of our text an answer?
    Evidently to the unspoken thought of Nicodemus.
  5. How does the fact that Nicodcmus was a Pharisee help us to understand our Lord's words?
    The Pharisees had rejected John's message.
  6. To what did the Pharisees object in Johns teaching?
    To his baptising Jews {see
    Matthew 21., 25-27; Luke 7., 29, 30).
  7. What was the ground of their objection?
    They thought that Jews within the covenant had no need of the washing of baptism.
  8. How does our Lord show the folly of this idea?
    By pointing out that all men must be born again.
  9. How did John's baptism teach this truth?
    It was a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins.
  10. With what words of Nicodemus is our Lord's reply directly connected?
    "No man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him."
  11. How does our Lord's reply point out the mistake of Nicodemus?
    By showing that until a man is born again he is unable to recognise God's work.
II. - A Spiritual Revolution Indicated.
  1. How does our Lord show the importance of this message?
    He introduces it with "Verily, verily."
  2. What is meant by "Verily."?
    Truly.
  3. What is peculiar about the double expression, " Verily, verily"?
    It occurs only in John's Gospel and is only used by our Lord.
  4. How does our Lord bring home to Nicodemus his own respon sibility?
    By using the words, "I say unto thee."
  5. What does this personal address teach us?
    That we must face the question of entrance into God's kingdom as individuals.
  6. What was our Lord's message to Nicodemus?
    The text.
  7. How is the general nature of this requirement shown?
    By the words "except a man," etc.
  8. Can you give the thought, "Except a man," etc., in other words'?
    "If anyone is not born again he cannot see," etc.
  9. What is the meaning of saying "except a man," etc.?
    Unless we get a wholly new nature we cannot share in spiritual things.
  10. What is the marginal reading for "again"?
    "From above."
  11. What three meanings does the word bear in the New Testament?
    (l) "The top," literally
    (Matthew 27., 51; John 19., 23).
    (2)"Above," figuratively (James 1., 17).
    (3) "From the very first" (Luke 1., 3 - compare Acts 26., 5).
  12. Where else is the word used in this chapter?
    John 3., 31 (compare John 19., 11 and 23).
  13. What support has the rendering "from above "?
    It is the usual way of rendering the word in John's Gospel.
  14. What do the words "born from above" teach us?
    That the new life comes down from God.
  15. What do the words "born again," or "from above," teach us as to the nature of the change?
    They teach us that it must be complete and radical.
  16. How do the following words of Nicodemus show that our Lord spoke of an entire change of nature?
    He expressed great surprise and asked, "How can a man be born when he is old"?
  17. What error of the Pharisees did our Lord condemn?
    The error of depending on external observances.
  18. How is the urgent necessity of this change indicated?
    By the added words, "He cannot see the kingdom of God."
  19. What is meant by the addition of "cannot see" ?
    Cannot enjoy, or partake of (compare
    Luke 2., 26: Acts 2., 27; 1 Peter 3., 10).
III. - A Heavenly Vision Resulting.
  1. What does our Lord call the sphere of the new birth?
    The kingdom of God.
  2. What is meant by the Kingdom of God?
    The rule and reign of God over His people.
  3. What was the Pharisees' idea of this kingdom?
    An external rule over the bodies of men
    (compare Acts 1., 6).
  4. How does our Lord correct this idea?
    By teaching that only the true children of God could see it.
  5. What truth do His words teach us?
    That apart from divine renewal we have no share in God's kingdom.
  6. What does this teach us about the visible expression of God's kingdom?
    That it cannot always be identified with the inner reality.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning admission to God's kingdom?
    That we are admitted to the kingdom by baptism.
  2. What words of our Lord seem to support this?
    (John 3., 5.)
  3. How do the words here contradict the idea of such mechanical admission?
    By insisting on the inner change as essential.
  4. What place has baptism in relation to this inner change?
    It is the outer sign appointed by God, but must be accompanied by an inner work of the Spirit to be effectual.


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The GOSPEL of JOHN 6., 35.

And Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger:
and he that believeth on me shall never thirst.




Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall not hunger,
and he that believeth on me shall never thirst." - R.V.

And Jesus said to them, "I am the bread of life. He who comes to Me shall never hunger,
and he who believes in Me shall never thirst." - N.K.J.V.

Jesus said to them, "I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger,
and whoever believes in me shall never thirst." - E.S.V.

THE THIRD TEN - TEXT 3.

I. - A Powerful Image.
  1. To whom were these words addressed?
    To the multitude at Capernaum
    (John 6., 24).
  2. In answer to what appeal were they spoken?
    John 6., 34.
  3. What gave rise to this conversation?
    The demand for a sign
    (John 6., 30).
  4. To what Old Testament sign did the multitude refer?
    (John 6., 31.)
  5. What was the object of referring to this sign?
    To challenge comparison between our Lord and Moses.
  6. How does our Lord correct their mistake?
    By saying, "Moses gave you not that bread from heaven, but My Father giveth you the true bread from heaven."
  7. What did our Lord add to the words, "Moses gave you not that bread from heaven"?
    " My Father giveth you the true bread from heaven."
  8. What is the characteristic of the true bread from heaven?
    John 6., 33.
  9. How does our Lord contrast the " true bread " with the manna?
    (a) Moses gave manna. The Father is giving the true bread.
    (b) Fathers ate mana and died. True bread giveth life (compare
    John 6., 49 and 50 with (John 6., 33).
    (c) Manna for one time. True bread for world (John 6., 33).
  10. What mistake did our Lord's hearers make?
    They thought He was speaking of miraculous bread which they could eat.
  11. How does our Lord correct the error?
    By the statement recorded in
    John 6., 35.
  12. What does our Lord call Himself in this text?
    " The Bread of Life."
  13. What is meant by "Bread of Life"?
    Bread whose nature it is to give and sustain lite.
  14. What did our Lord mean by saying, "I am the Bread of Life"?
    What bread does for the body I do for the whole man. Bread supports physical life. I give eternal life, life indeed.
  15. What do the words "The Bread of Life" teach us?
    That we obtain life and sustenance only in Christ.
  16. What other text teaches us that our Lord Is the life?
    (
    John 14., 6. First Ten - Text 2)
  17. What lesson may we learn from the use of the metaphor "bread."?
    That the life-giving qualities in our Lord are only obtainable by us by actual participation in Him.
  18. How is participation in Him contrasted with participation in the manna?
    The one was only a passing benefit, the other is the Bread of Life, and whoso eateth shall live for ever
    (John 6., 50).
  19. What relation to our bodies has the participation in the Bread of Life?
    It guarantees the resurrection
    (John 6., 54).
II. - A Double Form of Invitation.
  1. How is the necessity of an active share in Christ expressed in our text?
    By "cometh" and " believeth."
  2. What is meant by "He that cometh to Me"?
    He that is making a movement of his soul in My direction.
  3. How may we know that our soul is moving towards Christ?
    By a consciousness of a desire for the things He offers us.
  4. What does He offer us?
    Pardon, peace, eternal life,
  5. Who are those who are coming to Christ?
    Those who are looking for pardon, peace, and eternal life,
  6. What, then, is required to satisfy our soul?
    A personal approach to our Lord Jesus Christ.
  7. What other words does our Lord use in the text to explain "coming"?
    " He that believeth on Me."
  8. What is meant by "believeth"?
    Continually placing our trust in Him.
  9. What connection is there between "coming" and "believing"?
    Those who come do so because they rely on our Lord Jesus Christ, and those who rely on Him prove it by approaching Him for blessing.
  10. What does the use of "coming" and "believing" teach us?
    That we must understand our Lord's words in a spiritual sense.
  11. What limit do they put upon the blessing offered?
    They limit it to those who are in a certain condition of soul.
III. - A Promise of Complete Satisfaction.
  1. How does our Lord express the result of "coming" and "believing"?
    That those who do so shall never hunger or thirst.
  2. What do " hunger " and " thirst" represent?
    The want of satisfaction in the soul.
  3. What does our Lord here claim?
    That He only can satisfy the needs of the soul.
  4. What kind of satisfaction does our Lord offer?
    A permanent satisfaction.
  5. How is the completeness of this satisfaction expressed?
    By the use of the word "never" (compare
    Luke 19., 30; read John 1., 18: "at any time").
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. With what other expression are the words "coming" and "believing" connected in this chapter?
    Eating the flesh of the Son of Man and drinking His blood.
  2. How would you show that the two expressions mean the same thing?
    The words "coming" and "believing" have the same blessing attached as "eating and drinking" (compare
    John 6., 51 and John 6., 54), and the word "Bread" is expressly identified with "Flesh" (John 6., 51.)
  3. What does the Church of Rome say "Eating the flesh and drinking the blood " mean?
    Partaking of our Lord's real body and blood in the Holy Communion by receiving them into our mouths.
  4. What do we say they mean?
    Receiving in our souls the benefits of our Lord's, body offered for us and His blood shed for us.
  5. How does this text prove that our interpretation is the correct one?
    Because it attaches the benefits to "coming" and "believing" which are attached to eating and drinking, showing that a spiritual act is referred to in both places.


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EPHESIANS 2., 1.

And you hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins;




And you did he quicken, when ye were dead through your trespasses and sins. - R.V.

And you He made alive, who were dead in trespasses and sins, - N.K.J.V.

And you were dead in the trespasses and sins. - E.S.V.
Note: The first part of this verse, which is included in the other versions, is omitted in this version.

THE THIRD TEN - TEXT 4.

I. - A Sorrowful Condition.
  1. Why does this text begin with "And"?
    To connect it with what goes before.
  2. What has the Apostle been speaking about?
    The Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  3. To what does the Apostle ascribe the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ?
    To the working of God's mighty power.
  4. What does he say besides of God's mighty power?
    That it is exercised on behalf of those who believe.
  5. What is the value of the Resurrection of our Lord to those who are seeking to know the greatness of His power?
    It sets it out in full evidence as a power that raises the dead.
  6. What three blessings did God the Father confer on our lord Jesus Christ?
    (1) Raised Him from the dead,
    (2) made Him sit on His right hand,
    (3) put all things in subjection under His feet,
  7. What is the connection between these blessings and what follows in our text?
    Paul goes on to speak of personal experiences of God's power in the Ephesians.
  8. How does he open this reference?
    By addressing them directly "And you," etc.
  9. What lesson can we draw from this mode of address?
    That the Ephesians had a conscious experience of God's power in their Jives.
  10. What effect should this have upon us?
    It should lead us to seek for a similar experience.
  11. How does Paul describe the former condition of the Ephesians?
    As " dead in trespasses and sins."
  12. What is the true connection between his thought here and the previous message about our Lord's resurrection?
    In both cases God's power was exercised upon a condition of death.
  13. How is the condition of spiritual death further described?
    Ephesians 2., 2 and 3.
  14. What does this teach us about the word "dead" or "death" when applied spiritually?
    That it indicates a state of wrong existence, not a state of non- existence.
  15. What made it necessary for God to raise our Lord Jesus Christ?
    The fact that He came under the power of death for us.
  16. What made it necessary for the Ephesians to experience a spiritual resurrection?
    The fact that they came under the power of spiritual death.
  17. How did death enter into the race?
    By means of sin.
II. - Fatal Cause.
  1. How is this expressed in our text?
    "Dead in trespasses and sins."
  2. What is meant by "trespasses" ?
    Failures in duty by which we fall from favour. (See Note.)
  3. What is meant by "sins" ?
    Acts by which we miss the mark and fall short of the glory of God.
  4. What is the result of trespasses and sins?
    They kill the soul.
  5. What is the R.V, for "dead in trespasses and sins" ?
    "Dead through your trespasses and sins" (note the dative).
  6. What effect had this death upon our actions?
    It caused us to fulfil the desires of the flesh and of the mind (
    Ephesians 2., 3).
  7. In what relation did it place us towards God?
    It made us "by nature the children of wrath."
    {Ephesians 2., 3).
  8. What does this teach us about sin?
    That it is the most deadly enemy to man.
  9. What does it teach us about our natural state?
    That we are incapable of following after the things of God.
  10. What is the only hope of the dead soul?
    The rich mercy and love of God
    (Ephesians 2., 4),
  11. How is this love of God exhibited towards us?
    By quickening us together with Christ.
  12. How is this quickening expressed in Ephesians 2., 8, 9, 10? (Second Ten - Text 8)
    As being saved by grace through faith.
  13. How, then, may we know that we have been quickened by God?
    By the fact that we put our trust In Jesus Christ our Lord.
III. - A Great Renewal.
  1. What is the effect of God's quickening?
    It raises us up with Christ, makes us sit m heavenly places, and creates us unto good works.
  2. What is meant by being "raised with Christ" ?
    Lifted from the service of evil and given a new nature with holy desires.
  3. What is meant by sitting in heavenly places?
    Daily enjoying the benefit of communion with God and our lord Jesus Christ.
  4. How do these facts find expression in our lives?
    By a service of good works which are the results of faith.
  5. What great truth do the words "You hath He quickened" teach us?
    That we owe our salvation entirely to the power of God.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. How does our text teach us that we cannot attain salvation by our own efforts?
    By stating we are dead in trespasses and sin.
  2. How is our natural helplessness more fully explained?
    By saying that in such a state we lived in the lusts of the flesh
    (Ephesians 2., 3).
  3. What is given as the moving cause of our salvation?
    God's great love wherewith He loved us.
  4. What error of the Church of Rome is condemned in these words?
    The error that a man prepares and disposes himself for justification by the effect of his own will.
  5. What is the teaching of God's Word on salvation?
    That we owe it to the free grace of God bestowed on us when we did not seek it or deserve it.


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The GOSPEL of LUKE 18., 13.

And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much, as his eyes unto heaven,
but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner.




But the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven,
but smote his breast, saying, God, be merciful to me a sinner. - R.V.

And the tax collector, standing afar off, would not so much as raise his eyes to heaven,
but beat his breast, saying, 'God, be merciful to me a sinner!' - N.K.J.V.

But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to heaven,
but beat his breast, saying, 'God, be merciful to me, a sinner!' - E.S.V.

THE THIRD TEN - TEXT 5.

I. - A Remarkable Contrast.
  1. In what parable do these words occur?
    In the parable of the Pharisee and the Publican.
  2. Who were the Pharisees?
    A self-righteous sect of the Jews who wanted separation from the Roman Government, and were stern in insisting on all Jewish observances.
  3. Who were the Publicans?
    The tax-gatherers appointed by the Romans, who frequently greatly oppressed the people (cf,
    Luke 3., 13).
  4. To what class of people was the parable spoken?
    "Unto certain which trusted in themselves that they were righteous."
  5. Why did our Lord put a Publican in contrast with a Pharisee?
    Because the Publicans were generally despised and were often tyrannical and dishonest.
  6. What class of people to-day would the Pharisee represent?
    Those who are very exacting in their demands on others, and observe all the outward forms of religion.
  7. What class of people to-day would the Publican represent?
    Those who have wandered away from the old religious habits and have become hardened and careless.
  8. Where did the two men go?
    "Up into the temple."
  9. What is meant by "up into the temple"?
    Into the court reserved for Jewish worshippers. (Not into "the holy place," much less the "holy of holies.")
  10. What was the men's object in going into the temple?
    To pray.
  11. What difference is noticed as to their prayer?
    The Pharisee prayed as one who had a right to be there with outstretched hands and eyes looking up (compare
    Matthew 6., 5). The Publican, unused to prayer, with downcast eyes afar off.
II. - A Penitent Posture.
  1. How is the position of the Publican at prayer fully described?
    "Standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast."
  2. What did his standing afar off imply?
    That he recognised that he had little reason to mingle with other worshippers, having forgotten God.
  3. What other signs of. penitence did the Publican show?
    He kept his eyes down and smote upon his breast.
  4. What lesson does this teach us?
    That God regards expressions of sorrow, for sin which come from a penitent heart.
III. - A Plea for Mercy.
  1. What was the prayer of the Publican?
    "God be merciful," etc.
  2. What is the meaning of the word "merciful" ?
    Be propitiated towards me.
  3. What is meant by "Be merciful" or "Be propitiated" ?
    Deal with me as one upon whom Thou canst look with favour.
  4. What led the Publican to use a prayer like this?
    Most probably the remembrance that in the Temple the lamb was offered as a propitiation for the sins of the people (
    Leviticus 4., 32; see also (Exodus 29., 38-42).
  5. What does this prayer teach us about God's relation to man?
    That as man has offended God, there is need of some ground of mercy, on which God can approach the sinner.
  6. On what ground did the Jews look for mercy?
    On the ground that God accepted a sacrifice "as an atonement for sin."
  7. On what ground do we expect mercy from. God?
    On the ground that our Lord Jesus Christ suffered for our sins.
  8. For whom did the Publican ask mercy?
    For himself.
  9. What does this teach us?
    That our prayers should be personal - a direct approach for our own needs.
  10. How did the Publican describe himself ?
    As a sinner.
  11. What lesson does this teach us?
    That we can bring nothing as a plea before God but our great need.
IV. - A Gracious Response.
  1. What does our Lord. say resulted from the Publican's prayer?
    He "went down to his house justified."
  2. What is meant by "justified" ?
    Accounted righteous - treated as if we had never sinned.
  3. Why did the Pharisee miss justification?
    Because he never felt the need of seeking for it.
  4. Why did the Publican obtain justification?
    Because, he sought it with repentance, depending only on the pure mercy of God.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What mistake did the Pharisee make?
    He trusted in his own righteousness.
  2. On what ground did he hope for blessing?
    On the ground, that he did more than the law required.
  3. What are works done over and above the law's requirements Works of supererogation.
  4. What Church teaches that such works can be done?
    The Church of Rome.
  5. What do the Churches of England and of Ireland say concerning this teaching?
    It "cannot be taught without arrogancy and impiety" (Article 14.)
  6. How does this passage support our teaching?
    Our Lord commended the Publican and not the Pharisee.
  7. What blessing did the Publican receive?
    Justification.
  8. How did he receive it?
    By confessing his sin direct to God.
  9. On what ground did he expect forgiveness and justification?
    Solely on the ground of God's mercy and not for, anything in himself.
  10. What does this teach us?
    Justification is free, obtained by faith in God and not for our own works or deservings." (Article 11.)


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HEBREWS 7., 25.

Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him,
seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.




Wherefore also he is able to save to the uttermost them that draw near unto God through him,
seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them. - R.V.

Therefore He is also able to save to the uttermost those who come to God through Him,
since He always lives to make intercession for them. - N.K.J.V.

Consequently, he is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through him,
since he always lives to make intercession for them. - E.S.V.

THE THIRD TEN - TEXT 6.

I. - A Complete Salvation.
  1. Why does this text begin with "Wherefore" ?
    To direct attention to a fact before given.
  2. What is the fact given before?
    That our Lord has an unchangeable priesthood.
  3. Why is our Lord's priesthood unchangeable?
    Because He abideth ever.
  4. With what is our Lord's unchangeable priesthood contrasted?
    With the changeable priesthood of the Levitical law.
  5. Why was it necessary to have many priests under the old law?
    Because they were hindered by death from continuing.
  6. What kind of a priest therefore does the Gospel require?
    A priest who is not subject to death.
  7. What Priest fulfils this condition?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  8. What Old Testament prophecy foretold this?
    Psalm 110., 4; compare Hebrew 7., 21.
  9. What does this chapter teach us about any system in which there are many priests who die?
    That it is weak and unprofitable.
  10. What does our text teach us about the eternal priesthood of our Lord Jesus Christ?
    That because He lives for ever He is able to save to the uttermost.
  11. What do these words teach us about the object of our Lord's priesthood?
    That our Lord's priesthood was undertaken by Him for the salvation of men.
  12. From what does our Lord save men?
    From the penalty and power of sin.
  13. How is the fulness of our Lord's salvation expressed?
    "To the uttermost."
  14. What is meant by "to the uttermost" ?
    Completely, in every mode or manner (compare
    Luke 13., 11.).
  15. What does this teach us about our salvation?
    That it is a continual process with an assured end.
  16. How do we learn that salvation is a continual process?
    By the fact that it is connected with our Lord's unchangeable priesthood. His rule goes on unhindered because He is never removed by death.
  17. How do we learn that our salvation has an assured end?
    By the fact that He is able to save completely, in every manner, to full accomplishment.
II. - A Direct Way of Approach.
  1. On behalf of whom is our Lord's priesthood exercised?
    On behalf of those who draw near to God.
  2. What is meant by coming or drawing - near to God?
    Approaching God for pardon and blessing.
  3. Under the Old Law how did men draw near to God?
    By means of sacrifices offered by the priest.
  4. How are we bidden to come to God?
    Through our Lord Jesus. Christ.
  5. What is meant by coming unto God by our Lord Jesus Christ?
    Seeking from God pardon and blessing on the ground of what our Lord has done for us.
  6. What does this teach us about our approach to God?
    It must be through the priestly office of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  7. What encouragement to come to God does the text offer?
    It teaches that those who come thus are saved to the uttermost.
  8. What lesson may we draw from the words, "He is able to save" ?
    Our Lord by His permanent priesthood alone possesses the power of salvation.
  9. What adds strength to this idea?
    The text concludes a long argument showing that our Lord is superior to the Jewish priests.
  10. What are the principal points of His superiority?
    It is established by oath, and is endless.
  11. How do the following words show us that our Lord alone has power to save?
    By adding, "He ever liveth to make intercession for them."
III. - A Continual Intercession.
  1. What is meant by "He ever liveth to make intercession"?
    Because our Lord ever lives, His intercession avails for us at all times, there is no break.
  2. What is meant by the words "to make intercession"?
    They mean that our Lord lives in heaven for the very purpose of interceding for those who come to God through Him.
  3. How did pur Lord Himself teach this truth?
    John 14., 6.( "I am the Way ... no man cometh .... but by Me." (First Ten - Text 2.)
  4. What may we learn from the fact that our Lord lives to intercede?
    That we can be sure of His advocacy and we have no need of any other, nor have we any promise of God to encourace us to seek any other.
  5. What is meant by "to make intercession for" Presenting requests on behalf of another,
  6. What two offices of priest does ou Lord exercise?
    Sacrificing and interceding.
  7. What is the contrast between them?
    Sacrificing was done once for all, never to be repeated. Interceding continues at all times for those who come unto God by Him.
  8. What does this text teach us about our lord's intercession It is effective because He ever liveth and it is employed for our complete salvation.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What difference is there between our Lord's intercession and our prayers?
    Our Lord demands from God those things which are necessary, in virtue or His priesthood. We can only ask in accordance with His will and in dependence on His promise.
  2. What do we object to in the Church of Rome's teaching on the invocation of saints?
    She invokes them to plead with God on the ground of their merits.
  3. How does our text contradict this teaching?
    By showing that it is only He Who ever lives and intercedes Who can save fully.
  4. How does this text teach us that we do not require the merits or intercession of saints?
    By telling us that those who come to God through our Lord Jesus Christ are fully saved - have all they need.


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The GOSPEL of JOHN 16., 13.

Howbeit when he, the Spirit of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth: - for he shall not speak of himself; but whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak: and he will show you things to come.




Howbeit when he, the Spirit of truth, is come, he shall guide you into all the truth: for he shall not speak from himself; but what things soever he shall hear, these shall he speak: and he shall declare unto you the things
that are are to come. - R.V.

However, when He, the Spirit of truth, has come, He will guide you into all truth; for He will not speak on His own authority, but whatever He hears He will speak; and He will tell you things to come. - N.K.J.V.

When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth, for he will not speak on his own authority, but whatever he hears he will speak, and he will declare to you the things that are to come. - E.S.V.

THE THIRD TEN - TEXT 7.

I. - The Mission of the Spirit of Truth.
  1. With what word does our text begin?
    "Howbeit."
  2. What is the meaning of "howbeit" ?
    Though that be so - notwithstanding.
  3. To what fact does the word "howbeit" refer?
    John 16., Verse 12. (Augustine rejects the connection. He takes it rather of intensive knowledge. Ignorance being due to lack of spiritual comprehension. Illustrated by the Trinity as known to men,and to angels.)
  4. How were the Apostles made able to bear the whole truth?
    By the work of the Holy Spirit.
  5. What is the Holy Spirit called?
    The Spirit of Truth.
  6. Why is the Holy Spirit so called?
    Because He is Himself and therefore fully reveals "the truth." (Genitive of quality or respect.)
  7. What work is here ascribed to the Holy Spirit?
    To guide into all the truth.
  8. What may we learn from these words?
    That the Holy Spirit came to complete the revelation of God.
  9. How did our Lord prepare His disciples for this message?
    By telling them it was expedient for Him to go away.
  10. How does our Lord describe the work of the Holy Spirit towards "the world"?
    John 16., Verses 8, 9, 10, 11.
  11. What two great works, are thus brought before us?
    The work of reproving or convicting, and the work of guiding into all the truth..
  12. How are these works distinguished?
    The work of convicting is operating in the world, the work of guiding is specially for the disciples. ("He will guide you.")
  13. What is the R.V. for "guide you into all truth" ?
    "Into all the truth."
  14. What is meant by "guide you into all the truth" ?
    Into the whole of the revelation of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  15. What does this teach us about revelation?
    That God completed His message to men in the Person of our Lord Jesus Christ.
II. - The Restraint of the Spirit of Truth.
  1. How do the following words help to make this clear?
    They tell us "He shall not speak of Himself; but whatsoever He shall hear, that shall He speak."
  2. What is meant, by "He shall not speak of Himself." ?
    The teaching of the Holy Spirit does not come from Himself alone, but is declared in union with God the Father and our Lord Jesus Christ. (Note the R.V.: "From Himself.")
  3. What words that follow show us that this is the meaning?
    "He shall receive, of Mine, and shall show it unto you."
  4. How does this help us to know when we are guided by the Spirit?
    We know that the Spirit's guidance always teaches us something about our Lord Jesus Christ.
  5. What truths were specially brought home in fulness to our Lord's disciples?
    The truths concerning His death, resurrection, ascension, and coming again.
  6. What is meant by "whatsoever He shall hear, that shall He speak"?
    Whatever God desires to communicate He, gives to the Spirit.
  7. Where does our Lord give the same teaching?
    John 8., 40; 12., 49.
  8. What does this fact teach us about the Gospel?
    It comes from the Father through the Son and is brought home to our hearts by the Holy Spirit,.
III. - The Double Character of His Message.
  1. What is the first work of the Spirit for the disciples?
    To speak whatsoever He hears.
  2. From whom does the Spirit "hear"? From God the Father and God the Son.
  3. Where is the work of the Spirit found?
    In the sacred Scriptures.
  4. How does the Holy Spirit continue this work?
    By bringing home to our hearts the message contained in the Scriptures.
  5. What reason have we for thinking that the writing of the Scriptures was the actual guidance into all truth?
    All that we can now possibly know about our Lord Jesus Christ is contained in the Scriptures.
  6. What is the second work of the Spirit for the disciples?
    "He will show you things to come"
  7. What "things that are to come"(R.V) was the Spirit to declare?
    Things that belonged to the kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  8. In what book of the New Testament is this promise specially fulfilled?
    In the Book of The Revelalion.
  9. To whom should we look for guidance in the truth?
    To the Holy Spirit.
  10. What confidence have we in seeking His aid?
    The promise of the Saviour that He will be our Guide.
  11. How does this affect our study of the Scripture?
    It ought to make us diligent in study as here we have the work of the Spirit promised in our text.
IV - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concern in the knowledge of truth?
    That such knowledge is committed to the Church.
  2. What do Roman Catholics mean by the Church?
    The teaching body consisting of the Pope and the Bishops^ especially when they meet in Council.
  3. What, does our Article XXI. say of General Councils?
    That "(forasmuch as they be an assembly of men, whereof all be nor governed with the Spirit and Word of God), they may err, and sometimes have erred, even in things pertaining unto God."
  4. How does this Article show we can best obtain the promise of our text?
    By taking those things of which "it may be declared that they be taken out of holy Scripture." (Article XXI.)
  5. How can we show that the Church, as defined by the Church of Rome, cannot always claim to be guided into truth?
    By pointing out that frequently the Church has contradicted the message of the Spirit in the Word of God.
  6. What does our text tell us as to the right way to understand the truth?
    We understand the truth by submission to the Spirit Who is given to those who obey God.


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ACTS 17., 11.

These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.




Now these were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, examining the scriptures daily, whether these tings were so. - R.V.

These were more fair-minded than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness, and searched the Scriptures daily to find out whether these things were so. - N.K.J.V.

Now these Jews were more noble than those in Thessalonica; they received the word with all eagerness, examining the Scriptures daily to see if these things were so. - E.S.V.

THE THIRD TEN - TEXT 8.

I. - An Interesting Comparison.
  1. With what word does our text begin?
    "These."
  2. To. whom does the pronoun "these" refer?
    To the Jews of Berea.
  3. What was it that brought Paul to Berea?
    The tumult at Thessalonica.
  4. Where is Thessalonica?
    It is a town in Macedonia, Greece (modern Salonika, at that time a most important place cn the main road to Rome; Note accuracy of
    Acts 17., 6 who speaks of magistrates as Greek which occurs on the arch of Varden in the city, but was unknown to ancient writers. This was evidently a special kind of magistrate.
  5. What led Paul into Macedonia?
    The vision of the man at Troas.
  6. In what, towns of Macedonia did Paul preach?
    Philippi, Thessalonica, Berea.
  7. What happened in each place?
    Some believed, but there was a tumult, and persecution.
  8. What lesson can we learn from this?
    Opposition and tumult - no evidence that we are not where God wants us to be.
  9. To what place did Paul go at first in all these towns?
    To the Jewish synagogue,
  10. What are we told about the Jews of Berea?
    They were more noble than those in Thessalonica.
  11. What is meant by the words "more noble" ?
    Of better spirit and character.
  12. What is the original meaning of the words?
    Better, born (compare our word, "gentleman"). See
    Luke 19., 12; 1 Corinthians 1., 26.
  13. Why do you think it does not mean better born here?
    Because the comparison is between the Jews of the two cities. It would be strange if all the Jews who were noble by birth were in one city.
  14. What does this use of the Greek word teach those who are well born?
    That they should give evidence of it in a proper spirit and character.
  15. What lesson have they for everyone?
    That all can show the character that is expected of the great.
  16. What hindered the Thessalonians from being noble?
    The spirit of jealousy or envy
    (Acts 17., 5).
  17. What did this spirit ]ead them to do?
    To join with wicked men who formed a rabble ( Greek - the equivalent to our corner, boys, or loafers).
  18. What lesson does this contain for us?
    That we cannot keep a noble mind if we keep base company.
II.- A Right Moral Condition.
  1. How did the Bereans display a more noble character than the Thessalonians?
    "They received the word with all readiness of mind."
  2. What was "the word" they received?
    Verse 3.
  3. What is meant by "readiness of mind" ?
    An eager desire for truth.
  4. How did "readiness of mind" show nobility of character?
    It revealed them as free from narrow prejudice.
  5. What lesson does this teach us?
    That God is pleased if He finds us eager to learn.
  6. What is meant by "they received the word " ?
    They took Paul's preaching into their minds and hearts.
  7. What is meant by "the word"?
    God's message to man in our Lord Jesus Christ.
III.- A Useful Daily Occupation.
  1. What else did the Bereans do?
    "Searched the Scriptures daily," etc.
  2. What is meant by the word "searched" ?
    Examined with great care, and with a view to judgment (Different word in
    John 5., 39 - trace out point by point. Here Greek - investigate with a view to interpreting, used in Attic law of the steps taken by lawyers to see if an action would lie.) John 5., 39, (Text I-8).
  3. To what particulars was their attention directed?
    To the Old Testment prophecies.
  4. What word is added that shows the thorough nature of their examination?
    "Daily."
  5. What does the word "daily" suggest?
    That Paul brought under their notice the Old Testament evidence day by day.
  6. To what did the Bereans direct their examination?
    To see "whether those things were so."
  7. To what does "those things" refer?
    To the facts that Christ must suffer and rise again from the dead
  8. What does this teach us as to the value of the Old Testament?
    That we can use it to see God's purpose revealed in our Lord Jesus Christ.
  9. What do the words teach us as to our own duty?
    That we ought to test everyone's message by God's word.
  10. What does it prove concerning the use of the Scriptures?
    That God intended them to be in the hands of the people and to be read.
IV, - Error Condemned.
  1. What name do we give to this examination to see whether things are so?
    The right cf private judgment.
  2. What is meant by "the right of private judgment" ?
    The right I have in relation to my fellow-man, to read the word of God for myself and exercise my judgment to find out God's mind and will.
  3. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning the reading and interpretation of the Scriptures?
    "That no one, relying on his own skill, shall ... presume to interpret the said Scriptures contrary to that sense which holy mother church - hath held "and doth hold."
  4. Hnw does this text show that God intended each one to interpret the Scriptures?
    The Bereans are commended for examining into the truth of Paul's doctrine.
  5. What is the true attitude towards teachers?
    To receive their word with a ready mind, but to search the Scriptures and prove the truth in them.


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ROMANS 8., 1.

There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus,
who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.




There is therefore no condemnation to them that are in Christ Jesus. - R.V.
Note: The latter part of the text is omitted in this version.

There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus,
who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit. - N.K.J.V.

There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. - E.S.V.
Note: The latter part of the text is omitted in this version.

THE THIRD TEN - TEXT 9.

I. - A Great Deliverance.
  1. What great fact is mentioned in our text?
    . No condemnation to those in Christ Jesus.
  2. What does the use of "therefore" show us?
    That we have here a conclusion from what goes before.
  3. What had Paul been speaking about before?
    The conflict between good and evil in the mind.
  4. What does he call the tendency to evil in our mind?
    "The body of this death." (
    Romans 7., 24.)
  5. What question does he ask concerning "the body of this death"?
    "Who shall deliver me?"
  6. What answer does he give to hjs question?
    "I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord."
  7. How is this message enforced by our text?
    "There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus."
  8. What illustration of freedom does Paul give us in Romans 7.?
    The illustration of a woman freed from marriage by the death of her husband.
  9. How does he apply this illustration to true Christians?
    Romans vii., 4.
  10. What conclusion does he draw from this illustration?
    Romans 7., 6.
  11. Why is it that we have to be freed from the law?
    Because we are sinners.
  12. How do we get freedom?
    Through our Lord Jesus Christ by union with Him.
  13. How is this deliverance from the law connected with our text?
    Both facts are introduced by the same word, "now," Compare
    Romans 7., 6, and 8., 1.
  14. What is meant by saying, "there is now no condemnation" ?
    Whenever union, with Christ is realised condemnation is removed. (Bengel makes it a temporal particle, "quae tempus praesens . . denotat." Others make it causative, "on this account," or "when this state is realised.")
  15. What is meant by condemnation?
    Sentence to punishment - to condemn to death.
    (1 Timothy 5., 12;)
  16. What does this teach us about our natural condition?
    That we are deserving of wrath,
  17. What does it teach us about the deliverance of Christ?
    It is very full and complete. (Greek is emphatic - no manner of condemnation.)
II. - An Essential Condition.
  1. Who receive this benefit of freedom from condemnation?
    Those who are "in Christ Jesus."
  2. What is meant by "in Christ Jesus" ?
    In union with Him as our Head, united as a branch to the vine.
  3. Why is it necessary to be "in Christ Jesus" ?
    Because it is only by His merits we can satisfy God's law.
  4. What does connection with Christ do for us?
    It makes His merits available for us.
  5. What illustration of this union has been given just before?
    Romans 7., 4. (R.V.: "Joined.")
  6. Why is this illustration given?
    It represents the closest earthly tie. ("They twain shall be one flesh."
    Matthew 19., 5.)
  7. What does this teach us?
    That to be "in Christ" is a very real experience.
  8. What is the effect of being "in Christ" That we walk not after the flesh but after the Spirit.
III. - A Blessed Result.
  1. How does Paul express this previously?
    We serve in newness of spirit, and not in the oldness of the letter' (
    Romans 7., 6. R.V.)
  2. What is the difference between R.V, and A.V, in our text?
    The words, "who walk not after the flesh, but after the spirit," are omitted in R.V.
  3. Where do the words occur again?
    In
    Romans 8., 4.
  4. What do we learn from their occurrence there?
    That they give us the result of being "in Christ."
  5. What is meant by "walk. . . after the Spirit"?
    Directing our lives according to the demands of the Spirit.
  6. What "Spirit" is meant?
    The renewed soul animated by the Holy Spirit of life.
  7. What does this teach us concerning those who are in Christ Jesus?
    That they have a desire to serve God in their daily lives.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What is the first condition of free service?
    Release from condemnation.
  2. How is this release secured?
    Through our Lord Jesus Christ.
  3. What does Paul teach about condemnation?
    That it is entirely removed when we are in Christ Jesus.
  4. What two kinds of punishment does the Church of Rome say attaches to sin?
    Eternal and temporal.
  5. How is eternal punishment usually put away?
    By means of the Sacrament of Penance.
  6. How is temporal punishment removed?
    By fasting and almsgiving here, and in purgatory hereafter. '
  7. What does this teaching lead us to think?
    That we can do some little thing to remove God's wrath.
  8. How does our text condemn all this?
    No condemnation. Nothing left for us to do to merit God's favour.


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The GOSPEL of LUKE 23., 42. 43.

And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom.
And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise.




And he said, Jesus, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom.
Then he said to Jesus, "Lord, remember me when You come into Your kingdom."
And Jesus said to him, "Assuredly, I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise." - N.K.J.V.

And he said, "Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom."
And he said to him, "Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise." - E.S.V.

THE THIRD TEN - TEXT 10.

I. - An Appeal.
  1. Who spoke the first words of our text?
    The penitent thief.
  2. What are we told previously about him?
    He rebuked his companion thief.
  3. For what did he rebuke his companion?
    For reviling our Lord.
  4. What did the penitent thief say to his companion?
    Luke 23., verses 40, 41.
  5. What is remarkable about these words?
    He acknowledged the justice of his sentence.
  6. What does this teach us?
    The first step to forgiveness is a true sense of sin.
  7. What led the other thief to revile our Lord?
    The jibes of the priests and people.
  8. What effect had these revilings on the penitent thief?
    They led him to consider the claim of our Lord Jesus Christ.
    (Bengel: "Faith accepts seriously the truth distorted by the adversaries.")
  9. What lesson does this contain for us?
    That God can bless His message even when men revile it.
  10. What did the thief say to Jesus?
    "Lord, remember me," etc.
  11. What is R.V. for "Lord, remember me"?
    "Jesus, remember me."
  12. What is meant by "Remember me"?
    Have me in your mind for favour.
  13. What is R.V. for "comest into Thy kingdom"?
    "Comest in Thy kingdom."
II. - A Conviction.
  1. To what faith did the thief give expression in these words?
    To the faith that our Lord was coming as a king into His own.
  2. What makes this confession very remarkable?
    The fact that it was addressed to the dying Christ.
  3. What action of the disciples helps us to understand the greatness of the thief's faith?
    They all forsook him and fled.
  4. What was the nature of his request?
    An appeal for favourable notice at some distant time.
  5. What two facts concerning our Lord had the thief grasped?
    That He was innocent of evil and that He is a true King.
  6. What did these two fans lead him to expect?
    A coming kingdom for our Lord.
III. - A Response,
  1. What was the effect of his appeal?
    It brought an immediate response.
  2. Who tried in vain to get an answer from our Lord?
    Herod (
    Luke 23., verse 9).
  3. What does this teach us?
    That our Lord only answers those who seek Him truly.
  4. What makes our Lord's answer full of comfort to us?
    The fact that He thought of a sinner when He was in agony on the Cross.
  5. What is remarkable about our Lord's answer when compared with the other words from the Cross?
    It is the longest of all.
  6. What may we learn from this?
    That our Lord gave Himself extra agony to bring comfort to the dying robber.
IV.- A Blessing.
  1. What were our Lord's words?
    Luke 23., verse 43.
  2. What is meant by "Verily"?
    Truly. Of a truth. Greek., Amen.
  3. Why does our Lord use it here?
    Because of the greatness of His promise which might well raise doubt.
  4. What two great facts in His promise went far beyond the thief's request?
    (l) The immediate answer, 'To day - not after a. long time' - "when Thou comest."
    (2) The direct association with our Lord - not merely a favourable remembrance.
  5. What gave the word "to-day" a very special measure of comfort?
    Crucifixion was usually a long process, and would have been but for the "crucifragium," or breaking of the bones of the crucified.
  6. What special word did our Lord use to describe the blessing He promised?
    Paradise.
  7. What is the meaning of the word "Paradise"?
    A park or garden. See
    Nehemiah 2., 8, Ecclesiastes. 2., 5; Song of Solomon., 4., 13.
  8. To what garden on earth is it especially applied?
    The Garden of Eden.
  9. What idea would it convey to the robber?
    That he would be in a place of blessing with Jesus.
  10. What is peculiar about the use of the word "Paradise"?
    This is the only time our Lord uses it.
  11. Why may we infer that our Lord uses it here?
    In pity of the robber's ignorance, it would be the word he best understood.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. Where did the penitent robber go?
    To be with Christ in Paradise.
  2. How would you show lhat this is a privilege of all believers?
    Because Paul expected it and taught the Corinthians to expect it
    (
    2 Corinthians 5., verse 8).
  3. Why was it not possible for our Lord to go to purgatory?
    He had no sin of His own for which to atone.
  4. What, then, does the promise to the robber teach us?
    That those who trust in Christ go to be with Him, and therefore there is no purgatory.

Additional Texts Mentioned in the Study Questions

Third Ten - Text 1
  • Question 7. For I acknowledge my transgressions: and my sin is ever before me. Psalm 51., 3.
  • Question 9. For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; Romans 3., 23.
  • Question 10. Against thee, thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil in thy sight: that thou mightest be justified when thou speakest, and be clear when thou judgest. Psalm 51., 4.
  • Question 13. Behold, I was shapen in iniquity; and in sin did my mother conceive me. Psalm 51., 5.
  • Question 29. 7 Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. 8 Make me hear joy and gladness, That the bones You have broken may rejoice. 9 Hide Your face from my sins, And blot out all my iniquities. 10 Create in me a clean heart, O God, And renew a steadfast spirit within me. Psalm 51., 7-10.

  • Third Ten - Text 2
  • Question 2. There was a man of the Pharisees, named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews: John 3., 1.
  • Question 3. The same came to Jesus by night, and said unto him, Rabbi, we know that thou art a teacher come from God: for no man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him. John 3., 2.
  • Question 6. The baptism of John, whence was it? from heaven, or of men? And they reasoned with themselves, saying, If we shall say, From heaven; he will say unto us, Why did ye not then believe him? But if we shall say, Of men; we fear the people; for all hold John as a prophet. And they answered Jesus, and said, We cannot tell. And he said unto them, Neither tell I you by what authority I do these things. Matthew 21., 25-27;
    And all the people that heard him, and the publicans, justified God, being baptized with the baptism of John. But the Pharisees and lawyers rejected the counsel of God against themselves, being not baptized of him. Luke 7., 29, 30.
  • Question 22. 1. And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent; Matthew 27., 51;
    Then the soldiers, when they had crucified Jesus, took his garments, and made four parts, to every soldier a part; and also his coat: now the coat was without seam, woven from the top throughout. John 19., 23.
    2. Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning. James 1., 17.
    3. It seemed good to me also, having had perfect understanding of all things from the very first, to write unto thee in order, most excellent Theophilus, Luke1., 3
    Which knew me from the beginning, if they would testify, that after the most straitest sect of our religion I lived a Pharisee. Acts 26., 5.
  • Question 23. He that cometh from above is above all: he that is of the earth is earthly, and speaketh of the earth: he that cometh from heaven is above all. John 3., 31.
    11. Jesus answered, Thou couldest have no power at all against me, except it were given thee from above: therefore he that delivered me unto thee hath the greater sin. 23. Then the soldiers, when they had crucified Jesus, took his garments, and made four parts, to every soldier a part; and also his coat: now the coat was without seam, woven from the top throughout. John 19., 11, 23.
  • Question 30. And it was revealed unto him by the Holy Ghost, that he should not see death, before he had seen the Lord's Christ. Luke 2., 26.
    Because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. Acts 2., 27.
    For he that will love life, and see good days, let him refrain his tongue from evil, and his lips that they speak no guile:
    1 Peter 3., 10.
  • Question 33. When they therefore were come together, they asked of him, saying, Lord, wilt thou at this time restore again the kingdom to Israel? Acts 1., 6.
  • Question 38. Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God. John 3., 5.

  • Third Ten - Text 3
  • Question 1. When the people therefore saw that Jesus was not there, neither his disciples, they also took shipping, and came to Capernaum, seeking for Jesus. John 6., 24.
  • Question 2. Then said they unto him, Lord, evermore give us this bread. John 6., 34.
  • Question 3. They said therefore unto him, What sign shewest thou then, that we may see, and believe thee? what dost thou work? John 6., 30.
  • Question 4. Our fathers did eat manna in the desert; as it is written, He gave them bread from heaven to eat.
    John 6., 31.
  • Question 8. For the bread of God is he which cometh down from heaven, and giveth life unto the world. John 6., 33.
  • Question 9. Your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness, and are dead. This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die.John 6., 49 and 50.
    For the bread of God is he which cometh down from heaven, and giveth life unto the world. John 6., 33.
  • Question 11. And Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst. John 6., 35.
  • Question 16. Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.
    John 14., 6.
  • Question 18. This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die. John 6., 50.
  • Question 19. Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day. John 6., 54.
  • Question 35. Saying, Go ye into the village over against you; in the which at your entering ye shall find a colt tied, whereon yet never man sat: loose him, and bring him hither. Luke 19., 30. No man hath seen God at any time, the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him. John 1., 18.
  • Question 37. I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world. John 6., 51
    Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day.John 6., 54.

  • Third Ten - Text 4
  • Question 13. Wherein in time past ye walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience:
    Among whom also we all had our conversation in times past in the lusts of our flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature the children of wrath, even as others. Ephesians 2., 2, 3.
  • Question 23. Among whom also we all had our conversation in times past in the lusts of our flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature the children of wrath, even as others. Ephesians 2., 3.
  • Question 24. Among whom also we all had our conversation in times past in the lusts of our flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature the children of wrath, even as others. Ephesians 2., 3.
  • Question 27. But God, who is rich in mercy, for his great love wherewith he loved us, Ephesians 2., 4.
  • Question 29. For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works, lest any man should boast. For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them. Ephesians 2., 8, 9, 10.
  • Question 37. Among whom also we all had our conversation in times past in the lusts of our flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature the children of wrath, even as others.Ephesians 2., 3.

  • Third Ten - Text 5
  • Question 3. And he said unto them, Exact no more than that which is appointed you. Luke 3., 13.
  • Question 11. And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward. Matthew 6., 5.
  • Question 19. And if he bring a lamb for a sin offering, he shall bring it a female without blemish. Leviticus 4., 32.
    Now this is that which thou shalt offer upon the altar; two lambs of the first year day by day continually. The one lamb thou shalt offer in the morning; and the other lamb thou shalt offer at even: And with the one lamb a tenth deal of flour mingled with the fourth part of an hin of beaten oil; and the fourth part of an hin of wine for a drink offering. And the other lamb thou shalt offer at even, and shalt do thereto according to the meat offering of the morning, and according to the drink offering thereof, for a sweet savor, an offering made by fire unto the LORD. This shall be a continual burnt offering throughout your generations at the door of the tabernacle of the congregation before the LORD: where I will meet you, to speak there unto thee. Exodus 29., 38-42.

  • Third Ten - Text 6
  • Question 8. The LORD hath sworn, and will not repent, Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek.
    Psalm 110., 4.
    (For those priests were made without an oath; but this with an oath by him that said unto him, The Lord swear and will not repent, Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec:) Hebrews 7., 21.
  • Question 14. And, behold, there was a woman which had a spirit of infirmity eighteen years, and was bowed together, and could in no wise lift up herself. Luke 13., 11.
  • Question 31. Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.
    John 14., 6.

  • Third Ten - Text 7
  • Question 3. I have yet many things to say unto you, but ye cannot bear them now. John 16., 12.
  • Question 10. And when he is come, he will reprove the world of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment: Of sin, because they believe not on me; Of righteousness, because I go to my Father, and ye see me no more; Of judgment, because the prince of this world is judged. And when he is come, he will reprove the world of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment: Of sin, because they believe not on me; Of righteousness, because I go to my Father, and ye see me no more; Of judgment, because the prince of this world is judged. John 16., 8-11.
  • Question 22. But now ye seek to kill me, a man that hath told you the truth, which I have heard of God: this did not Abraham. John 8., 40.
    For I have not spoken of myself; but the Father which sent me, he gave me a commandment, what I should say, and what I should speak. John 12., 49.

  • Third Ten - Text 8
  • Question 4. And when they found them not, they drew Jason and certain brethren unto the rulers of the city, crying, These that have turned the world upside down are come hither also; Acts 17., 6.
  • Question 12. He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return. Luke 19., 12.
    For ye see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called: 1 Corinthians 1., 26.
  • Question 16. But the Jews which believed not, moved with envy, took unto them certain lewd fellows of the baser sort, and gathered a company, and set all the city on an uproar, and assaulted the house of Jason, and sought to bring them out to the people. Acts 17., 5.
  • Question 27. Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.
    John 5., 39.

  • Third Ten - Text 9
  • Question 4. O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death? Romans 7., 24.
  • Question 9. Wherefore, my brethren, ye also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that ye should be married to another, even to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit unto God. Romans 7., 4.
  • Question 10. But now we are delivered from the law, that being dead wherein we were held; that we should serve in newness of spirit, and not in the oldness of the letter. Romans 7., 6.
  • Question 13. But now we are delivered from the law, that being dead wherein we were held; that we should serve in newness of spirit, and not in the oldness of the letter. Romans 7., 6.
    There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. Romans 8., 1.
  • Question 15. Having damnation, because they have cast off their first faith. 1 Timothy 5., 12.
  • Question 22. Wherefore, my brethren, ye also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that ye should be married to another, even to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit unto God. Romans 7., 4.
  • Question 23. And said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife: and they twain shall be one flesh? Matthew 19., 5.
  • Question 26. But now we are delivered from the law, that being dead wherein we were held; that we should serve in newness of spirit, and not in the oldness of the letter. Romans 7., 6. KJV.
    But now we have been discharged from the law, having died to that wherein we were holden; so that we serve in newness of the spirit, and not in oldness of the letter. Romans 7., 6. Revised Version.
  • Question 28. That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. Romans 8., 4.

  • Third Ten - Text 10
  • Question 4. But the other answering rebuked him, saying, Dost not thou fear God, seeing thou art in the same condemnation? And we indeed justly; for we receive the due reward of our deeds: but this man hath done nothing amiss. Luke 23., 40, 41.
  • Question 21. Then he questioned with him in many words; but he answered him nothing. Luke 23., 9.
  • Question 26. And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise. Luke 23., 43.
  • Question 32. And a letter unto Asaph the keeper of the king's forest, that he may give me timber to make beams for the gates of the palace which appertained to the house, and for the wall of the city, and for the house that I shall enter into. And the king granted me, according to the good hand of my God upon me. Nehemiah 2., 8.
    I made me gardens and orchards, and I planted trees in them of all kind of fruits: Ecclesiastes 2., 5.
    Thy plants are an orchard of pomegranates, with pleasant fruits; camphire, with spikenard, Song of Solomon 4., 13
  • Question 38. We are confident, I say, and willing rather to be absent from the body, and to be present with the Lord.
    2 Corinthians 5., 8.

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