The One Hundred Texts - Text Set 4 - 2017 Version.
Swanny's
Swaggy's
The One Hundred Texts

Bible studies for an understanding of Reformation Christianity
Text Set 4 -
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The Text Study Index.
Text Set 1 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 2 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 3 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 4 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 5 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 6 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 7 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 8 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 9 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 10 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


THE ONE HUNDRED TEXTS OF THE SOCIETY FOR IRISH CHURCH MISSIONS.

THE FOURTH TEN

GENESIS 6. 5.

And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination
of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually




And the LORD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination
of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. - R.V.

Then the Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. - N.K.J.V.

The LORD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intention
of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. - E.S.V.

The FOURTH TEN - TEXT 1.

I. - God Beholds Wickedness.
  1. When were these words spoken?
    Immediately before the announcement of the judgment of the Flood.
  2. What gave rise to the statement in our text?
    The fact that mankind, as they increased, became wicked.
  3. What are we told about the men of those days?
    They were mighty men and men of renown, (
    Genesis 6., 4.)
  4. What is meant by the word " mighty "?
    Men of great energy and ability.
  5. What is meant by "men of renown"?
    Men who made a name for themselves.
  6. What does our text say of them?
    Their wickedness was great.
  7. What lesson does this teach us?
    That men may be very clever and attain to fame, and yet be evil in God's sight.
  8. What is said about God in our text?
    That He saw the wickedness of man.
  9. What is meant by "God saw"?
    That God turned His attention to man's wickedness.
  10. What does this teach us?
    That God will not lightly pass over wrong-doing.
II. - The Extent of Wickedness.
  1. What did God behold?
    Wickedness.
  2. What is the meaning of the word "wickedness" here?
    That which breaks up, or destroys.
  3. What does the use of the word here show us?
    That by this time the sin of man had become a raging tumult.
  4. How is this further expressed in the text?
    It tells us that wickedness was great in the earth.
  5. What is here meant by the word "great"?
    That wickedness abounded, there was very much or it.
  6. What hint is given us as to the kind of wickedness that prevailed?
    The word for "giants" means tyrants, men that strike down others compare (
    Genesis 6., 13.)
  7. What else are we told about the wickedness?
    "That every imagination," etc., was evil,
  8. What is meant by " every imagination of the thoughts "?
    Every formation of a device or purpose.
III. - The Seat of Wickedness..
  1. Where is this formation of purpose said to take place?
    In the heart.
  2. What is meant by the "heart"?
    The understanding, affections, and will. (See
    Jeremiah 17., 9, 10, Page 151.)
  3. What does this text teach us concerning man?
    That his wickedness lias corrupted his whole nature.
  4. What three words in the text show us that this corruption is complete?
    "Every," "only," "continually."
  5. What is the marginal reading for "continually"?
    "Every day."
  6. How does Article ix. describe this condition?
    "Man is very far gone from original righteousness." (Art. ix.)
  7. What name is sometimes given to this doctrine?
    The doctrine of total depravity.
  8. Does the text mean that no good thing can be done by sinful man?
    Only that nothing perfectly good in God's sight can be done.
  9. What text following shows that there were degrees of evil, all were not equally bad?
    Genesis 6., 9.
  10. How can we show that the two statements are equally correct?
    In the eyes of God Noah was a sinner with no single perfect desire or thought, but in comparison with men he was upright and found favour with God.
  11. What, then, is meant when we speak of "total depravity"?
    That our heart is so sinful that of itself it can never reform or seek God.
  12. What saying of our Lord teaches this truth?
    John 3., 3. (Third Ten - Text 2, page 99.)
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does this text teach us?
    That human nature is always evil in the sight of God.
  2. Where does sin take its rise?
    In the very forming of our thoughts.
  3. What does this teach us?
    That sin is present before we begin to act.
  4. What does it teach us about the intentions of man?
    That evil is mingled with all his intentions.
  5. What do the Jesuits teach about sin?
    That it consists in act and is only sinful if there is intention to do evil.
  6. What does our text teach us?
    That in act and intention alike we have wandered from God.
  7. How should we act if our conscience does not condemn us?
    We should still be on our guard lest we disobey God's Holy Word.
  8. What does this text teach us about the thought of repentance?
    That true repentance must come from God and not from ourselves.
  9. What does the Church of Rome teach about repentance?
    That we can turn and prepare ourselves by the motion of our own will.
  10. How does our text contradict this teaching?
    It tells us "every imagination . . . was only evil continually."


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JEREMIAH 17., 9, 10.

The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?
I the LORD search the heart, try the reins, even to give every man according to his ways,
and according to the fruit of his doings,




The heart is deceitful above all things, and it is desperately sick: who can know it?
I the LORD search the heart, I try the reins, even to give every man according to his ways,
according to the fruit of his doings. - R.V.

"The heart is deceitful above all things, And desperately wicked; Who can know it?
I, the Lord, search the heart, I test the mind, Even to give every man according to his ways,
According to the fruit of his doings. - N.K.J.V.

The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick; who can understand it?
"I the LORD search the heart and test the mind, to give every man according to his ways,
according to the fruit of his deeds." - E.S.V.

THE FOURTH TEN - TEXT 2.

I. - The Corrupt Heart,
  1. Concerning what part of man does our textt speak?
    The heart.
  2. What is meant by the heart?
    Man's inner nature, his mind, affections, will. Compare (
    Exodus 14., 5; Deuteronomy 4., 29; viii,, 5; ix., 5;
    1 Samuel 7., 3; Job 27., 6; 34., 10, 34; Psalm 73., 26; 104., 15; Isaiah 30., 29.)
  3. What are we told about the inner nature?
    That it is deceitful and desperately wicked.
  4. What is meant by "deceitful" ?
    Uncertain, (Same word in
    Isaiah 40., 4; " uneven or rugged." Delitzsch gives "proud.")
  5. What are we to gather from the words "The heart is deceitful"?
    That man's inner nature is unreliable and corrupt.
  6. In what connection does Jeremiah use these words?
    In connection with putting trust in man.
  7. To what does he compare those who trust in man?
    To "the heath in the desert"
    (Jeremiah 17., 6).
  8. What is meant by "like the heath in the desert" ?
    Like a plant left alone in solitude - destitute, forlorn with no hope of. growth and expansion.
  9. With what does he contrast such a man?
    With one who trusts in the Lord.
  10. To what is he compared?
    Jeremiah 17., 8.
  11. In what connection does our verse follow?
    It gives a reason for the warning.
  12. How does the fact that the heart is deceitful lead us to distrust man?
    We cannot be sure that his purposes will not change.
  13. What words are added to show, the extent of deceitfulness?
    "Above all things."
  14. What is meant by " deceitful above all things" ?
    The most deceitful thing we can imagine.
  15. What lesson does this teach us?
    That we cannot rely on our own affections, will, purposes, desire, or conscience.
II. - The Unsearchable Heart.
  1. What words are added to describe, the heart?
    "Who can know it"?
  2. What is meant by knowing the heart?
    Perceiving the real nature and bent of man's inner life.
  3. What do the words "Who can know it"? imply?
    That it lies beyond man's power to penetrate into his true inner life.
  4. What reason is given for saying man cannot know the heart?
    It is desperately wicked.
  5. What is R.V. for "desperately wicked" ?
    "Desperately sick."
  6. What words has Jeremiah used before explaining desperately wicked or sick?
    See
    Jeremiah 15., 18.
  7. What does this teach us?
    That healing of the disease of sin must come from God, not from ourselves.
III. - The Lord the Discerner.
  1. What does Jeremiah go on to tell us?
    The Lord searches the heart.
  2. What is meant by searching the heart?
    Discovering by His holy light its true character.
  3. What else does the Lord search or try?
    The reins.
  4. What part of our body is spoken of as "reins" ?
    The kidneys (used with a wider reference, "loins," etc.).
  5. What is meant by this use of the word "reins"?
    Man's inner nature, like the heart, but especially his emotions. (compare Driver Para. Psalter: "It is implied He is cognizant of man's emotions and affections not less, than of his thoughts.")
  6. What does the use of the two words together teach us?
    The Lord searches us through and through.
IV. - The Lord the Judge.
  1. What is the object of the Lord's search?
    "To give every man according to his ways."
  2. What does this teach us as to the source of action?
    It lies inside in the inner nature.
  3. What does it teach us about God's judgment?
    It will be unmistakably true.
  4. If tthe Lord judges us according to the fruit of our doings, what kind of fruit must the heart produce?
    Evil fruit, for it is desperately wicked.
  5. What false hope does this text destroy?
    Any resting in our own goodness.
  6. If we rest in our own goodness what does it prove?
    That an evil heart has turned us aside.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What position does the Church of Rome give the priest in the Confessional?
    The position of a judge.
  2. Of what is the priest a judge?
    Of conscience and motives.
  3. How does the text show us that this is wrong?
    No one can know the heart.
  4. How does it warn us that confession made to man is useless?
    That we may be led away, by our deceitful heart even in confession
  5. How does confession to God remedy this?
    We can open our heart to His searching.
  6. What ought this text lead us to do?
    To use
    Psalm 139., 23,as a prayer.


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1 TIMOTHY 1., 15.

This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation,
that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners; of whom I am chief.




Faithful is the saying, and worthy of all acceptation,
that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners; of whom I am chief: - R.V.

This is a faithful saying and worthy of all acceptance,
that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am chief. - N.K.J.V.

The saying is trustworthy and deserving of full acceptance,
that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am the foremost. - E.S.V.

THE FOURTH TEN - TEXT 3.

I. - The Character of the Message.
  1. How does Paul open the declaration in our text?
    "This a faithful saying."
  2. With what object does he use these words?
    - To draw attention to the greatness of his message.
  3. What is meant by the word "saying" ?
    A word or sentence embodying some truth.
  4. How many of these "sayings" occur in Timothy and Titus?
    Five (compare
    1 Timothy 1., 15; 3., 1; 4., 9. 2 Timothy 2., 11. Titus 3., 8).
  5. What can we gather from a comparison of these references?
    That these sayings seem to have been short proverbs in common use.
  6. What does Paul tell us first about this "saying" ?
    It is a faithful saying.
  7. What is meant by "faithful" ?
    Worthy of trust.
  8. How does the R.V. render "This is a faithful saying" ?
    "Faithful is the saying."
  9. What do we gather is St, Paul's meaning?
    What I am now quoting is a true, dependable message.
  10. How does he strengthen his assertion?
    By adding "and worthy of all acceptation,"
  11. What is meant by "worthy of all acceptation" ?
    Entitled to be received by all men as fully true.
  12. What added force does the little word "all" give to this message?
    It tells us that it is true in every way we can think of it,
  13. . What lesson does this teach us?
    That the message of salvation ought to awaken whole-hearted acceptance and confidence.
  14. How did Paul know this message was so faithful and worthy of acceptance?
    1 Timothy 1., 14. His own personal experience;
  15. Who are best able to speak of the full truth of God's message?
    Those who have heard and accepted for themselves.
  16. What two aspects of saving trust do the words bring to our mind?
    (1) Reliance on the word as true.
    (2) Reception of the word for our need.
II. - The Advent of Our Lord.
  1. To what saying did Paul refer?
    "Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners."
  2. To what great fact do these words refer?
    To the coming of our Lord in the flesh.
  3. What name do we give to the coming of our Lord in the flesh?
    The Incarnation.
  4. What does Paul say was our Lord's object in coming?
    "To save sinners."
  5. How is this expressed in the Nicene Creed?
    "Who for us men, and for our salvation, came down from heaven."
  6. What does the fact that our Lord "came" into the world teach us?
    That He existed before He "came."
  7. What name is given to our Lord in the text?
    Christ Jesus.
  8. What is the meaning of "Christ"?
    Anointed.
  9. What is the meaning of "Jesus"?
    God the Saviour.
  10. What do the combined words teach us?
    That God's promised, or Anointed One really was manifested when Jesus of Nazareth was born.
  11. What is meant by the word "save" ?
    To rescue from destruction, to heal.
III. - The Objects of Redemption.
  1. What is meant by "sinners" ?
    Those who are under the power of sin.
  2. What does this message teach us?
    That sinners need deliverance and our Lord Jesus Christ came to deliver them,
  3. What does Paul add to the saying?
    "Of whom I am chief,"
  4. What is meant by "I am chief"?
    I am in the first rank.
  5. Why did Paul regard himself as in the first rank of sinners' Because he was "a blasphemer, and a persecutor, and injurious ". (1 Timothy 1., 13).
  6. Why does Paul say "I am chief" rather than "I was chief" ?
    He was always repentant and wants us to remember that, though forgiven, we are sinners still.
  7. How does our Church teach us the same lesson?
    By putting into our mouth the words "Have mercy upon us miserable sinners." .
  8. What encouragement do the words "I am chief" give to us?
    They show us that Christ came to save all sinners, including the greatest.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning our Lord?
    That He is a severe Judge.
  2. What means does she suggest we should employ in approaching Him?
    Seek the intercession of saints and angels.
  3. What does Paul say our Lord came to do?
    To save sinners.
  4. If He came to save sinners what follows or necessity?
    That sinners are welcome to His side.
  5. And what proof is given that the very worst may come to Him?
    He saved Paul, the chief of sinners.


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ISAIAH 53., 5, 6.

But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities:
the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed,
All we like sheep have gone astray we have turned every one to his own way;
and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all.




But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities:
the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.
All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way;
and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. - R.V.

But He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities;
The chastisement for our peace was upon Him, And by His stripes we are healed.
All we like sheep have gone astray; We have turned, every one, to his own way;
And the Lord has laid on Him the iniquity of us all. - N.K.J.V.

But he was pierced for our transgressions;
he was crushed for our iniquities;
upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace,
and with his wounds we are healed.
All we like sheep have gone astray;
we have turned-every one-to his own way;
and the LORD has laid on him
the iniquity of us all. - E.S.V.

THE FOURTH TEN - TEXT 4.

I. - A Picture of Acute Suffering.
  1. Why does our text begin with "But" ?
    To bring before our minds a striking contrast.
  2. What is the contrast indicated?
    Between our attitude towards a sufferer and the fact that He suffered for us,
  3. How is our attitude towards the Sufferer described?
    Isaiah 53., 4.
  4. How is the fact that He suffered for us brought out?
    Isaiah 53., 5.
  5. Who is referred to in these words?
    The suffering servant of Jehovah (see
    Isaiah 52., 13).
  6. To what three classes is the term "servant of Jehovah" applied by Isaiah?
    (a) To Israel as a whole (
    Isaiah 41., 8);
    (b) to a part of Israel (Isaiah 49., 6, .7),.
    (c) to a particular individual who sums up all that God requires (Isaiah 53.).
  7. What is Cyrus called?
    God's Anointed, because he was God's instrument to bring Israel out of captivity.
    (Isaiah 45., 1.).
  8. Why is Israel called the servant of Jehovah?
    Because God, through His people, brought salvation to the world.
  9. Why is it necessary to speak of some in the nation as the servant?
    Because Israel sinned against Him and only a portion took part in the deliverance.
  10. What peculiar feature is attached to the Suffering Servant here spoken about?
    He bore the sins of others.
  11. What words are used to describe His sufferings?
    "Wounded," "bruised," "chastisement," "stripes."
  12. What is meant by "wounded"?
    , Struck or pierced by a sharp weapon.
  13. What is meant bv "bruised" ?
    Crushed, as with a heavy weight.
  14. What is meant by "chastisement" ?
    Correction inflicted by another.
  15. What is meant by "stripes" ?
    Wounds caused by blows or scourgings ("stripe-wounds").
  16. Why are all these words piled up in this description?
    That we might understand that the sufferings described were very severe.
  17. In whom is this description accurately fulfilled?
    In our Lord Jesus Christ (He was wounded by nails, thorns, and spear; He was bruised by the reed and the scourging and the buffets of the soldiers; He was smitten of God in chastisement; He had the stripe-wounds of the scourge and the reed).
II. - An Assertion as to Its Cause.
  1. Why were all these sufferings undergone?
    For our transgressions, for our .iniquities.
  2. What is meant by "transgressions" ?
    Acts of rebellion against God (English: stepping over the line).
  3. What is meant by "iniquities" ?
    Wrong courses - those which are not straight or right (English: want of Tightness, not equity or equal balance).
  4. How else is the relation of these sufferings to us described?
    "The chastisement of our peace was upon Him."
  5. What is meant by "the chastisement of our peace" ?
    That correction which secures peace to us was borne by the Sufferer (compare
    Ephesians 2., 14 el seq.; Colossians 1., 20).
  6. Who are meant by the "we " and the "our" of our text?
    First the people whom the prophet spoke (Israel) and after those who receive this message, "we" who now listen are included (compare R,V. marg. verse 1 - for "our report" is "that which we have heard.")
  7. What is added as to the effect of the sufferings?
    "With His stripes we are healed."
  8. What does this teach us?
    That God is satisfied with the sufferings described and accepts them on behalf of those for whom they were offered;
  9. Where are these words directly applied to our Lord's sufferings?
    1 Peter 2., 24.
III. - A Revelation of Our Sinful State.
  1. What reason does the prophet give to show the necessity of His suffering for us?
    "All we like sheep," etc.
  2. How is the universal character of our sin brought out?
    All have gone astray. Everyone has turned to his own way.
  3. What does this teach us?
    That we cannot hope to save ourselves.
  4. What is peculiar about sheep who go astray?
    They never find their way back by themselves.
  5. What is meant. by "have turned everyone to his own way"?
    Following our natural inclinations which, because of sin, lead us away from God.
IV. - An Open Door of Reconciliation.
  1. What remedy for this evil is mentioned?
    "The Lord hath laid on Him the iniquity of us all."
  2. What is the R.V. marg. for "laid on Him" ?
    "Made to light" on Him.
  3. What is meant by "laid on Him" or "made to light on Him" ?
    That all the sin which following our own way occasioned was summed up in our Lord Jesus Christ.
  4. What is meant by laying iniquity upon anyone?
    Exacting from him the punishment due to iniquity (compare
    Job 21., 19; see also Genesis 4., 13. 15., 16. 19., 15).
  5. What lesson does this teach us?
    That there is a perfect satisfaction for the sin of man in the sufferings of our Lord Jesus Christ.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning human merit?
    That we can attain merit by good works.
  2. How does our text contradict that?
    It says "all we like sheep have gone astray"; therefore we have failed and can merit nothing.
  3. What does the Church of Rome teach can be done with accumulated human merit?
    It can be employed to secure indulgences for the less worthy.
  4. How does our text contradict this teaching?
    By setting forth our lord Jesus Christ as the only meritorious Sufferer and declaring that His merit is sufficient for all.


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ISAIAH 1., 18.

Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet,
they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.




Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet,
they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool. - R.V.

"Come now, and let us reason together," Says the Lord, "Though your sins are like scarlet,
They shall be as white as snow; Though they are red like crimson, They shall be as wool." - N.K.J.V.

"Come now, let us reason together, says the LORD:
though your sins are like scarlet,
they shall be as white as snow;
though they are red like crimson,
they shall become like wool." - E.S.V.

THE FOURTH TEN - TEXT 5.

I. - An Invitation to Reasonable Consideration.
  1. How does our text begin?
    With the word "Come."
  2. With what do we connect the word " come " ?
    With an invitation.
  3. Who offers the invitation of our text?
    The Lord (i.e. Jehovah).
  4. To whom does He offer it?
    To His people.
  5. With what has the Lord been charging His people?
    The fact of their sin.
  6. To what places does the Lord address His charge against His people?
    The heavens and the earth, (
    Isaiah 1., 2.)
  7. Why is the appeal made to the heavens and the earth?
    Because the sin of Judah was open before heaven and resulted in punishments on the earth.
  8. What punishments does the prophet mention?
    Isaiah 1., 7, 8.
  9. To what fact is Israel's sin traced?
    Isaiah 1., 3.
  10. How did God's people seek to escape from' the charge laid against them?
    The multitude of their sacrifices and ceremonies (
    Isaiah 1., 11, 12, 13).
  11. What does this teach us?
    That there may be outward religion when the heart is far from God.
  12. What does God command instead of mere outward religion?
    Isaiah 1., 16, 17 (Note - R.V. marg., " Set right the oppressor " instead or "Relieve the oppressed," and compare Psalm 71., 4, the "cruel" man).
  13. How does our Lord enforce this duty?
    By the promise of our text.
  14. What is the Douay version of the opening words of the text?
    " And then come, and accuse me."
  15. What does "reason together" mean?
    "Confer together" or "plead together" (perhaps "bring our reasoning to a a end or a decision"; "examine with reason"; compare
    Job 13., 15).
  16. What must be the end of such considering or pleading?
    Man must see himself guilty before God.
  17. How is this shown in the text?
    The invitation is followed by a promise of pardon.
  18. What may we learn from the invitation to reason?
    That careful thought on the things of God is commanded.
  19. What encouragement is given to those in doubt?
    That God condescends to let them reason together with Him.
II. - A Two-fold Assertion of Sinfulness.
  1. How is the people's sin described?
    As scarlet and crimson.
  2. What is conveyed by describing our sins as scarlet and crimson?
    That they are glaring and deep-seated.
  3. How is the crimson or scarlet colour obtained?
    From the cochineal or kermes worm that lives in a certain kind of oak tree.
  4. Why is the colour derived from it selected?
    Because it was the deepest and fastest dye.
  5. What particular reference to a foregoing statement may be contained in the words " scarlet" and " crimson"?
    The reference to their hands being full of blood.
  6. What command had the Lord given just before?
    "Wash you, make you clean."
  7. How is the. promise here connected with that command?
    It shows that the Lord can remove the foulest stains.
III. - A Two-fold Promise of Pardon.
  1. How is the completeness of the cleansing shown?
    "White as snow," "as wool."
  2. What do the words "as white as snow" teach us?
    That there is not a trace of stain left when the Lord cleanses from sin.
  3. What do the words " as wool" teach us?
    That the cleansed soul is restored to its original character.
  4. Why is "wool" particularly mentioned?
    Because wool was very frequently dyed scarlet,
  5. In what do "snow " and "wool" resemble each other?
    They are both standards of perfect whiteness,
    (Snow and wool combined, compare
    Psalm 147., 16; Isa. 1., 18; Daniel 7., 9; Isaiah 7., 9; Revelation 1., 14.)
  6. What does "snow" typify as well as whiteness?
    Purity and righteousness (
    Psalm 51,, 7; Lamentations 4., 7).
  7. What does the combined promise teach us?
    That the Lord can completely cleanse us and accept us as completely righteous.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach about approaching God?
    That the sinner needs some saintly mediator to placate His anger,
  2. What does the text represent God as doing?
    Inviting the sinner to come and reason together with Him.
  3. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning forgiveness of sins after Baptism?
    That the eternal punishment alone is forgiven and that we have to pay the temporal punishment ourselves.
  4. Who were the people addressed in the text?
    Those who are spoken of as children - though rebellious.
  5. What does the text say concerning the sins of such?
    They are completely cleansed.
  6. How does this fact contradict Rome's teaching?
    If they are completely cleansed there can be no stain remaining to clear away.
  7. What great lesson is conveyed by God's message?
    The lesson that He alone can cleanse sin and that we should carry our sins to Him for cleansing.


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1 JOHN 2., 1, 2.

My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous; And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world.




My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye may not sin. And if any man sin, we have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous: and he is the propitiation for our sins; and not for ours only, but also
for the whole world. - R.V.

My little children, these things I write to you, so that you may not sin. And if anyone sins, we have an Advocate with
the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. And He Himself is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also
for the whole world. - N.K.J.V.

My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world. - E.S.V.

THE FOURTH TEN - TEXT 6.

I. - The Mode of Address.
  1. How does our text begin?
    " My little children."
  2. To whom does the pronoun "My" refer?
    To John.
  3. To whom do the words "little children" refer?
    To those who believe in the Lord Jesus Christ,
  4. Why should John speak of them as " children " ?
    Because he was the means of bringing them to our Lord Jesus Christ
    (compare Galatians 4., 19).
  5. What is meant by " little children "?
    Those who were regarded with affection as babes in Christ.
  6. What does this way of speaking show us?
    That the Apostles loved the early disciples very dearly.
II. - The Object in Writing.
  1. Why did John write to his " little children " ?
    That they might not sin.
  2. To what do "these things" refer?
    To his message concerning cleansing from sin. (Alford,. quite definitely to the preceding words. Bengel, equally definitely to those following, "quae sequuntur.")
  3. Why does John say, "These things write I unto you, that ye sin not "?
    He wanted his readers to know. that God's message is intended to draw us away from all sinful acts.
  4. : What mistake does this correct?
    The mistake of thinking that free forgiveness leads to continuance in sin.
  5. What does it teach us about the Christian life?
    That it is a life to which sin is foreign.
  6. What is " sin " ?
    Any want of conformity unto, or transgression of, the law of God.
  7. What truths written by John help us so that we may not sin?
    (a) Blood cleanseth
    (1 John 1., 7).
    (b) Confession (l John 1., 9).
  8. How do these truths find expression in our lives?
    By deliberate refusal to sin. "That ye sin not." Greek - Aor. 2. (The Aorist implies a definite act.)
  9. What does this teach us about the way to secure freedom from sin from our side?
    We must make up our minds to have done with sin.
  10. What may we learn from the fact that;John wrote his message?
    That it was Gods will to teach us by the written word,
  11. What obligation rests on. those to whom a message is written?
    The obligation to read it, or hear it read.
  12. What value is attached to hearing and reading the Word of God?
    It causes us to forsake sin.
  13. In what class of hearers, or readers, has God's Word this effect?
    In those who are also " doers of the Word "
    (James 1., 22 and 25).
III. - The Possibility of a Fall.
  1. What possibility does John immediately suggest?
    The possibility that a man may sin.
  2. How had he already expressed this possibility?
    "If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves"
    (1 John 1., 8).
  3. What does this teach us as to our attitude?
    We must not only resolve not to sin, we must be able to recognise when we sin.
  4. Why are the words, " If any man sin," added?
    To prevent one who trusts in Jesus falling into despair when he sins.
  5. By what means are Christians led into sin?
    By the still unrenewed part of them - the flesh. By the influence of those around - the world. By the direct attack of the Evil One - the Devil,
IV. - The Efficient Remedy.
  1. What does John offer for the encouragement of him who sins?
    " We have an Advocate," etc. ,
  2. What is meant by an "Advocate"?
    One who pleads for another on the ground of justice (called to the side of the offender in a criminal suit).
  3. What other word is used in the New Testament for Advocate?
    Comforter (four times in John's Gospel, of the Holy Spirit). Same word here of our Lord
    ( John 14., 16, 26: 15., 26; 16., 7). See also pages 65, 66 (Second Ten - Text 5).
  4. With whom is our Lord an Advocate?
    With the Father.
  5. Why does John say, " An Advocate with the Father " ?
    Because our sins have offended the Father.
  6. What makes our Lord's advocacy effective?
    He is " the righteous One."
  7. Whv does John speak here of Jesus Christ as " the Righteous "?
    To contrast His position before God with ours. We are the sinners. He is free from sin.
  8. What encouragement does the fact that our, Lord Jesus Christ is "the Righteous" afford us?
    We can be sure that His plea for us will be acceptable.
  9. What does it teach us as to the qualifications of an Advocate?
    That no one who is, or has been, a sinner can take the position.
  10. What other qualification does our Lord possess?
    " He is the propitiation for our sins."
  11. What is meant by "propitiation"?
    That which enables God to deal favourably with the sinner.
    ("It means sacrificial pacification of an offended power" - Moule).
  12. How is our Lord's death related particularly to us?
    "For our sins."
  13. How is the universality of our Lord's sacrifice taught?
    "For . . . the whole world."
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach the sinner to do?
    To make application to God by means of the saints.
  2. Why must application be made this way?
    Because of our unworthiness to approach God.
  3. What does John say?
    1 John 2., 1, 2.


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2 PETER 1., 21.

For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man:
but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost.




For no prophecy ever came by the will of man:
but men spake from God, being moved by the Holy Ghost. - R.V.

For prophecy never came by the will of man,
but holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Spirit. - N.K.J.V.

For no prophecy was ever produced by the will of man,
but men spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit. - E.S.V.

THE FOURTH TEN - TEXT 7.

I. - Prophecy in General,
  1. Why does, our text begin with "For"?
    To give a reason for what goes before.
  2. What goes before our text?
    The statement that no prophecy of Scripture is of any private interpretation.
  3. What is meant by prophecy?
    Teaching and prediction.
  4. What is the meaning of the word " interpretation " used in these texts?
    It comes from a verb which means "to set loose," and is employed of setting forth, explaining, or determining anything. (Verb used in LXX;
    Genesis 41., 12; also in Mark 4., 34; Acts 19, 39.)
  5. What is meant by saying prophecy is not of private interpretation?
    That the prophets did not expound their opinions simply on their own authority. (Another view, Thayer, etc. It needs the Holy Spirit to interpret.)
  6. How is the importance of this fact emphasised?
    By the words, "Knowing this first" (
    2 Peter 1., 20), that is, first of all, as an essential truth (compare 1 Corinthians 15., 3).
  7. How is the word of prophecy spoken of just before?
    As "a more sure word of prophecy" (
    1 Peter 1., verse 19).
  8. What is the R.V. for " a more sure word of prophecy "?
    " The word of prophecy made more sure."
  9. What does " the word of prophecy made more sure " mean?
    That by the revelation of our Lord Jesus Christ the prophetic message was confirmed and ratified.
  10. What other meaning can be given to the words?
    _ That the voice from heaven spoke of that which is more fully and by a greater number of persons set out in the word of prophecy which is therefore "more sure." (This is the suggestion of the A.V.: The Greek reads - "we have more sure the prophetic word,")
  11. What should be our attitude towards prophecy?
    We should take heed to it as a lamp shining in a dark place.
  12. What would be the effect of such attention on our part?
    It would cause the Day-star to arise in our hearts.
  13. What is the guarantee that this result would follow?
    The fact that prophecy is not of private interpretation,
II - Negatively Defined,
  1. How are the words " not of private intcrpietation" further explained?
    By saying prophecy came not by the will of man.
  2. What is the meaning of saying "prophecy came not by the will of man"?
    Prophecy was not brought into being by man's unaided power or merely through his own wish.
    (Note. Greek - There is a comparison with the voice and prophecy - both were " brought" from an outside source.)
  3. How is this statement that prophecy came not by the will of man strengthened?
    By adding the words " in the old time."
III.- With Exhaustive Completeness.
  1. What is the margin for "in old time"?
    "At any time."
  2. How does the R.V. give the meaning?
    "No prophecy ever came by the will of man."
  3. How does this fact give a guarantee of the sureness of the prophecy?
    It directs our attention to the fact that God, not man, was behind the messages of the prophets.
  4. How is this impression strengthened in a later passage?
    By the reference to the fact that false prophets arose among the people. (
    1 Peter 2., l.)
  5. How is a false prophecy distinguished from true prophecy?
    A false prophecy is a mere guess or surmise where it is not the result of policy. It is of the prophet's own will.
IV. - Positively Defined.
  1. How is true prophecy described?
    As holy men of God speaking as they were moved by the Holy Ghost
  2. What is the R.V. for "holy men of God spake"?
    "Men spake from God."
  3. What truth does this bring before us?
    That God is the Divine Source of prophecy.
V. - The Propounders. Their Character, and the Impulse moving them.
  1. What other fact is also brought under our notice?
    That the message came through men,
  2. What is the value of the fact that the message came through men?
    The thought of God was expressed in human speech and so could be understood.
  3. What is meant by the repression "from God "?
    It is meant that God Himself raised up these messengers.
  4. How is the influence on these men described?
    "They were moved by the Holy Ghost."
  5. What is the Rhemish rendering of "moved"?
    "Inspired."
  6. What does the word "moved" imply?
    A force impelling men, as a ship is carried by the wind (compare
    Acts ii., 2, where the participle is used as a gerund, "the rushing of a mighty wind ").
  7. Who is the Divine Agent who impelled men who spoke from God?
    God the Holy Ghost.
  8. What does this teach us about the formation of the Scriptures?
    That it is due to the direct action of God the Holy Spirit in men.
  9. What two words in our text establish this fact clearly?
    The word " came," i.e., was brought, and the word " moved," i.e., borne along.
  10. What is then the meaning of the whole text?
    . Prophecy did not come at any time from man's will; on the con- trary men sent from God spoke as they were impelled to speak by the power of the Holy Spirit.
VI. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome say this text teaches?
    "That the Scriptures can only be expounded by the same spirit wherewith they were written which is resident in the Church."
  2. What inference does she draw from this statement?
    That no private person can interpret Scripture, or if he does he must submit to the judgment of the Church.
  3. What advice given in the context shows that this cannot be the meaning?
    The advice "Whereunto ye do well that ye take heed " (
    2 Peter 1., verse 19), which shows that ordinary Christians were encouraged to study the prophecies and that they would be to them as a lamp shining in a dark place.
  4. Where does the New Testament teach that the Holy Spirit dwells?
    He dwells in the heart of every child of God and is not restricted to residence in the whole body collectively.
  5. What do we teach concerning the need of the Holy Spirit for the -interpretation of Scripture?
    We teach that His help is necessary and is given to those whose hearts are right with God.
  6. How does our text support this view?
    It teaches that the prophecies of Scripture came from God, were confirmed by the appearance of our Lord, and prove a lamp to the diligent reader until the Day-star arises in his heart - that is, until by the Holy Spirit's power he sees and knows our Lord Jesus Christ as the fulfilment of all God's purpose.


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1 PETER 2., 2, 3, 4, 5.

As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word that ye may grow thereby:
If so be ye have tasted that the Lord is gracious.
To whom coming, as unto a living stone, disallowed indeed of men, but chosen of God, and precious,
Ye also, as lively stones, are built up a spiritual house, an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God by Jesus Christ.




As newborn babes, long for the spiritual milk which is without guile, that ye may grow thereby unto salvation;
if ye have tasted that the Lord is gracious:
unto whom coming, a living stone, rejected indeed of men, but with God elect, precious,
 ye also, as living stones, are built up a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. - R.V.

2 As newborn babes, desire the pure milk of the word, that you may grow thereby,
3 if indeed you have tasted that the Lord is gracious.
4 Coming to Him as to a living stone, rejected indeed by men, but chosen by God and precious,
5 you also, as living stones, are being built up a spiritual house, a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. - N.K.J.V.

Like newborn infants, long for the pure spiritual milk, that by it you may grow up into salvation - if indeed you have tasted that the Lord is good. As you come to him, a living stone rejected by men but in the sight of God chosen and precious, you yourselves like living stones are being built up as a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. - E.S.V.

THE FOURTH TEN - TEXT 8.

I. - A New-born Desire.
  1. To whom were these words addressed?
    To the elect strangers. (
    1 Peter 1., 1, 2.),
  2. What is R.V. for "strangers scattered abroad"?
    "Sojourners of the Dispersion."
  3. What is meant by "the Dispersion "?
    The political movements which drove the Jews into various countries. (But see Note, "Dispersion," page 179.)
  4. How does our text describe these elect strangers?
    As new-born babes.
  5. In what words is their birth from God previously described?
    1 Peter 1., 23.
  6. What exhortation does Peter address to the new-born babes?
    "Desire the sincere milk of the word."
  7. What is the R.V. for "desire"?
    " Long for."
  8. What lesson is Peter teaching by these words?
    That just as an infant seeks food so the new-born soul ought to long for spiritual food.
  9. What does our text tell us is the spiritual food?
    "The sincere milk of the word."
  10. What is the R.V. for " the sincere milk of the word "?
    "The spiritual milk which is without guile."
  11. What Other meaning is given to the word " spiritual"?
    "Reasonable" (R.V. margin), i.e., rational.
  12. Where else does the word occur?
    Romans 12., 1.
  13. What does Peter here teach us about the food of the soul?
    That it is spiritual and given to us in the form of rational messages.
  14. Where is this spiritual food to be found?
    In God's holy Word.
  15. Who are they who really long for it?
    Those in whom God's Word has produced a new life.
  16. What character does Peter give to this spiritual food?
    It is " without guile " (R.V.).
  17. What is meant by saying spiritual milk is " without guile "?
    That there is no admixture of evil in it (it brings its own end without any further purpose).
II. - A Condition of Growth.
  1. What is the object of desiring the sincere milk of the word?
    " That ye may grow thereby."
  2. What words are here added in the R.V. and Rhemish Text?
    "Unto salvation."
  3. What does this teach us about the nature of this growth?
    That it is a development in holiness - an increase in our participation in the nature of God.
  4. What is necessary if we are to grow " unto salvation" ?
    That we should make the teaching of God's Word our own.
  5. What guarantee have we that if we study God's Word we shall grow in the right direction "unto salvation"?
    The fact that the spiritual milk is without guile. It cannot produce any other development.
III. - Tasting and Approaching the Lord.
  1. What gave the desire for spiritual milk to St Peter's readers?
    The-fact that they had tasted that the lord was gracious.
  2. What other word besides " tasting " does Peter use with reference to our Lord?
    The word " coming."
  3. What idea is contained in the word "coming"?
    The idea of continual approach for blessing (" tasting," we desire to feed continually; " coming," we cannot but continue to come).
  4. To what does St, Peter compare our Lord Jesus Christ?
    To a stone.
  5. Can you give any reason to explain Peter's fondness for this illustration?
    It was the name given him by the Lord (
    Matthew 16., 18).
  6. What character is given to this Stone?
    It is spoken of as a living stone.
  7. What does the use of the word " living" teach us?
    That Peter is talking of spiritual things and that our Lord gives life to those who approach Him bccause He is " the Living One." (Peter here gives to all Christians the character our Lord conferred upon him, so far was he from regarding it as a title to supremacy.)
  8. How do men treat the Living Stone?
    They disallow, or reject, Him.
  9. How does God regard the Living Stone?
    As elect and precious.
  10. What Is the meaning of "precious" here?
    Held in honour,
IV. - Characteristics of the Living Stone.
  1. What character do those who come to the Lord receive?
    They become "living stones " (R.V.) - Receiving life from Him.
  2. With what object are they made living stones?
    With the object of being built up a spiritual house.
  3. What does this teach us about the true temple of God?
    That it consists only of true believers built upon our Lord and each one living with His life.
  4. What else does Peter say living stones are?
    " An holy priesthood."
  5. What does this teach us about the priesthood?
    That every true believer is a priest unto God and needs no special priest except the Lord Jesus Christ, by union with whom he has become a priest.
  6. What is the nature of the sacrifices offered by believers as priests?
    They are spiritual sacrifices, not bodily or material (prayer, praise, thanksgiving, personal consecration).
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning Peter?
    That our Lord made him a rock and made all the Church subjcct to him.
  2. How do his words here contradict this idea?
    By teaching us that each believer shares the privilege of being a living stone and all alike derive their power from our Lord Jesus Chnst.


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The GOSPEL of JOHN 15., 4, 5.

Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch, cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; no more can ye, except ye abide in me. I am the vine, ye are the branches: He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same bringeth forth much fruit: for without me ye can do nothing.




Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; so neither can ye, except ye abide in me. I am the vine, ye are the branches: He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same beareth much fruit: for apart from me ye can do nothing. - R.V.

Abide in Me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, unless it abides in the vine, neither can you, unless you abide in Me. I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing. - N.K.J.V.

Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit by itself, unless it abides in the vine, neither can you, unless you abide in me. I am the vine; you are the branches. Whoever abides in me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing. - E.S.V.

THE FOURTH TEN - TEXT 9.

I. - An Exhortation to Close Fellowship.
  1. Who spoke these words?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. On what occasion were they spoken?
    On the occasion of the last Supper in the Upper Room.
  3. To what does our Lord compare Himself?
    To a vine.
  4. What does our Lord say is done to the branches in the vine?
    The unfruitful are taken away, the fruitful are pruned.
  5. What meaning is contained in that message?
    The warning that nothing avails except a life of fruitfulness.
  6. What does our Lord mention as the pruning or purifying power?
    The word He had spoken to the disciples.
  7. How, then, may we be sure that God's work of pruning is going on in our hearts?
    When we seek to follow the message of His Word in living faith.
  8. How is this process of purifying to be continued?
    By abiding in Christ.
  9. What is meant by "Abide"?
    Remain in close connection with Him.
  10. What injunction does our Lord add to "Abide in Me" ?
    "And I in you."
  11. What is meant by the double reference?
    We are to take care not only that we dwell in Christ but that Christ dwells in us.
  12. How may we secure that Christ dwells in us?
    By opening our heart to Him and by allowing Him to remove what hinders the work of His Spirit
  13. How does the nature of the vine help us to understand our Lord's command?
    The fibres of the vine run from the root to the furthest branch so that there is a very vital connection.
II. - An Illustration of Dependence.
  1. What does our lord tell us concerning the branch?
    It cannot bear fruit of itself.
  2. What lesson does this teach us?
    That our holiness is all due to the fact that we are clinging to Christ, and that Christ is working in us.
  3. How does our Lord explain further His meaning?
    By saying, "Except it abide in the vine."
  4. What picture does His words bring before our mind?
    The picture of a vine branch laden with grapes,
  5. Where do the grapes grow?
    On the branch.
  6. What enables the branch to bear grapes?
    Its connection with the vine root.
  7. How does our Lord directly apply this picture?
    By saying, "As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, no more can ye except ye abide in Me."
  8. What is the difference between the branch of the vine and those who trust in the Lord?
    The branch is in the vine unconsciously. Those who trust in the Lord can, and do, consciously abide in Him.
III. - The Secret of a Fruitful Life.
  1. What fact shows the importance of this truth?
    The fact that our Lord repeated His message to the disciples.
  2. In what words did He repeat it?
    "I am the vine," etc.
  3. What may we learn from the fact that our Lord is the vine?
    That all spiritual life and grace come only from Him,
  4. How does He emphasise the fact that union with Him is the source of blessing?
    By saying: "He that abideth in Me, and I in Him, the same bringeth forth much fruit."
  5. What lesson do these words teach us?
    That the object of being in Christ is to make us holy and useful in God's service.
  6. What peculiarity of the vine branch helps us to understand this?
    The fruitless vine branch serves no good purpose of any kind.
  7. What wonderful fact is revealed in the fruitfulness of the vine branch?
    The fact that it is through His servants our Lord Jesus Christ accomplishes His work in the world.
IV. - The Inability of the Isolated.
  1. How does our Lord still further emphasise the fact that all grace comes from Him alone?
    By adding, "For without Me ye can do nothing."
  2. What is the meaning of "without Me" ?
    Apart from Me, severed from Me.
  3. What is meant by "Ye can do nothing" ?
    Ye can bear no fruit.
  4. What truth do these words enforce?
    We must be in Christ before we can glorify God.
  5. What does this teach us about our works?
    Those only are good which result from the dwelling of our Lord in the heart.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning works done before the grace of Christ?
    That they can predispose us to obtaining salvation.
  2. How does our text cortfradict that?
    By telling us plainly that apart from Christ we can do nothing.
  3. What is the secret of a fruitful life?
    The continual abiding in Christ and Christ in us.
  4. Where, then, should we look for the presence of Christ?
    In the hearts of His people,
  5. What kind of Presence blesses the soul?
    The abiding of the Lord in the soul of His children.
  6. For what kind of Presence does the Church of Rome look?
    A bodily Presence upon an altar,
  7. How does our text contradict this idea?
    By showing that it is the vital power of Christ and not His bodily presence that produces a life of holiness.


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1 CORINTHIANS 3., 11.

For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid,, which is Jesus Christ,




For other foundation can no man lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ. - R.V.

For no other foundation can anyone lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ.- N.K.J.V.

For no one can lay a foundation other than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ. - E.S.V.

THE FOURTH TEN - TEXT 10.

I. - A True Foundation,
  1. Why does this text begin with "For" ?
    Because it gives a reason for what goes before.
  2. What goes before?
    See
    1 Corinthians 3., 10.
  3. To what does the apostle Paul compare himself?
    To a wise master-builder (our word "architect" comes from the Greek ).
  4. To what building is he referring?
    To the building of truth.
  5. Concerning what defect had he previously complained?
    The existence of division and strife.
  6. How does he show the evil of divisions concerning leaders?
    By reminding them that all are God's fellow-workers and that the building is God's (
    1 Corinthians 3., 9).
  7. What place does he give to himself in the work of building?
    The place of the master who laid the foundation.
  8. What is meant by saying "I have laid the foundation" ?
    I was the one who first brought to you the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  9. What does Paul add?
    "Another buildeth thereon."
  10. What is meant by "another buildeth thereon?"
    The teaching of our Lord, was being continually expanded and applied after it had been received.
  11. What does this teach us?
    That Christians should grow in the knowledge of our Lord, and God has given teachers for this purpose.
  12. What was the cause of the trouble in the Corinthian Church?
    Bad building on a good foundation,
  13. What was the result of this bad building?
    Strife and division,
  14. What lesson does this teach us?
    That if we are wrong in our teaching or in what we learn, the issue will be division and hatred.
  15. What warning therefore does Paul give?
    Let every man take heed how he buildeth.
  16. How can we take heed how we build?
    By testing all teaching by the Word of God before receiving and acting upon it.
  17. What is the first requirement for safety in a building?
    A good foundation.
  18. What warning concerning the foundation does Paul give?
    He warns us that there can be but one.
  19. How is the importance of this fact brought out in the text?
    It is given in two forms. No man can lay another different foundation. It is already laid (lying there).
II. - A Wise Laying of the Foundation.
  1. What is meant by saying that the foundation is laid?
    That already the Corinthians had received from Paul the true message of Christ.
  2. In what other sense is Christ as a foundation laid?
    In the sense that He is the eternal provision of God (
    Isaiah 28., 16).
  3. What important lesson is contained in the words, "Other foundation can no man lay"?
    The lesson that God's truth concerning our Lord Jesus must be received and cannot be altered.
  4. How did Paul enforce this previously?
    By pointing out that his laying of the foundation was according to the grace of God given him.
  5. What is requisite in a builder for laying the foundation?
    Wisdom.
  6. How does the master-builder show his wisdom?
    By seeing that a foundation is evenly laid in prepared ground.
  7. How did Paul fulfil these conditions in laying the foundation-stone?
    He was careful to give the whole truth, in a form suitable to the needs of his hearers, and place the important things first.
III. - A Declaration as to the Foundation.
  1. What does Paul say this foundation is?
    Jesus Christ.
  2. In what two ways is Jesus Christ the foundation?
    In His Person and His work.
  3. How is Jesus Christ the foundation in His Person?
    He alone enables God to reconcile sinners to Himself.
  4. In what way is His teaching a foundation?
    He alone could perfectly reveal God.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. How does Paul contrast the two kinds of building on the one foundation?
    Gold, silver, etc. Wood, hay, etc. (
    1 Corinthians 3., 12.).
  2. What lesson does this teach us?
    That human tradition may be faulty even when it speaks of Christ.
  3. What ought we to do?
    To test tradition by the foundation and not to explain the foundation by tradition.
  4. What happens to the faulty building?
    It is burned, (
    1 Corinthians 3., 13, 15.)
  5. Why must the faulty building be burned?
    Because the fire shall try every man's work.
  6. What does the Church of Rome say is meant by the fire?
    Purgatory. (See Rhemish Test. Note in loc.)
  7. What other meanings can be given to fire here?
    (a) Modern: Day of Judgment.
    (b) Ancient: God's Word testing, persecution, grief at failure, etc.
  8. How may it be shown it cannot be the fire of Purgatory?
    It is the work not the man. Every man's work is tried whether it be burned or not. The whole passage refers to doctrine.
  9. What are the two main thoughts in this passage?
    Founding and Building, or Foundation and Structure.
  10. What are the two lessons enforced?
    We must be on the foundation to be saved, we must build with care to receive a reward.

Additional Texts Mentioned in the Study Questions

Fourth Ten - Text 1
  • Question 3. There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown. Genesis 6., 4.
  • Question 16. And God said unto Noah, The end of all flesh is come before me; for the earth is filled with violence through them; and, behold, I will destroy them with the earth. Genesis 6., 13.
  • Question 20. The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?
    I the LORD search the heart, I try the reins, even to give every man according to his ways, and according to the fruit of his doings. Jeremiah 17., 9, 10.
  • Question 27. These are the generations of Noah: Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations, and Noah walked with God. Genesis 6., 9.
  • Question 30. Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God. John 3., 3.

  • Fourth Ten - Text 2
  • Question 2-1. And it was told the king of Egypt that the people fled: and the heart of Pharaoh and of his servants was turned against the people, and they said, Why have we done this, that we have let Israel go from serving us? Exodus xiv., 5;
    2-2. But if from thence thou shalt seek the LORD thy God, thou shalt find him, if thou seek him with all thy heart and with all thy soul. Deuteronomy iv., 29;
    Thou shalt also consider in thine heart, that, as a man chasteneth his son, so the LORD thy God chasteneth thee. Deuteronomy viii,, 5;
    Not for thy righteousness, or for the uprightness of thine heart, dost thou go to possess their land: but for the wickedness of these nations the LORD thy God doth drive them out from before thee, and that he may perform the word which the LORD swear unto thy fathers, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Deuteronomy ix., 5;
    2-3. And Samuel spake unto all the house of Israel, saying, If ye do return unto the LORD with all your hearts, then put away the strange gods and Ashtaroth from among you, and prepare your hearts unto the LORD, and serve him only: and he will deliver you out of the hand of the Philistines. 1 Samuel vii., 3;
    2-4. My righteousness I hold fast, and will not let it go: my heart shall not reproach me so long as I live. Job xxvii., 6;
    10. Therefore hearken unto me ye men of understanding: far be it from God, that he should do wickedness; and from the Almighty, that he should commit iniquity.
    34. Let men of understanding tell me, and let a wise man hearken unto me. Job xxxiv., 10, 34;
    2-5. My flesh and my heart faileth: but God is the strength of my heart, and my portion for ever. Psalm lxxiii., 26;
    And wine that maketh glad the heart of man, and oil to make his face to shine, and bread which strengtheneth man’s heart.Psalm civ., 15;
    2-6. Ye shall have a song, as in the night when a holy solemnity is kept; and gladness of heart, as when one goeth with a pipe to come into the mountain of the LORD, to the mighty One of Israel. Isaiah xxx., 29.
  • Question 4. Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low: and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain: Isaiah 40., 4.
  • Question 7. For he shall be like the heath in the desert, and shall not see when good cometh; but shall inhabit the parched places in the wilderness, in a salt land and not inhabited. Jeremiah 17., 6.
  • Question 10. For he shall be as a tree planted by the waters, and that spreadeth out her roots by the river, and shall not see when heat cometh, but her leaf shall be green; and shall not be careful in the year of drought, neither shall cease from yielding fruit. Jeremiah 17., 8.
  • Question 21. Why is my pain perpetual, and my wound incurable, which refuseth to be healed? wilt thou be altogether unto me as a liar, and as waters that fail? Jeremiah 15., 18.
  • Question 40. Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts: Psalm 139., 23.

  • Fourth Ten - Text 3
  • Question 4. This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners; of whom I am chief. 1 Timothy 1., 15;
    This is a true saying, If a man desire the office of a bishop, he desireth a good work. 1 Timothy 3., 1.
    This is a faithful saying and worthy of all acceptation. 1 Timothy 4., 9.
    It is a faithful saying: For if we be dead with him, we shall also live with him: 2 Timothy 2., 11.
    This is a faithful saying, and these things I will that thou affirm constantly, that they which have believed in God might be careful to maintain good works. These things are good and profitable unto men. Titus 3., 8
  • Question 14. And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.
    1 Timothy 1., 14.
  • Question 32. Who was before a blasphemer, and a persecutor, and injurious: but I obtained mercy, because I did it ignorantly in unbelief. 1 Timothy 1., 13;

  • Fourth Ten - Text 4
  • Question 3. Surely he hath born our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. Isaiah 53., 4.
  • Question 4. But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed. Isaiah 53., 5.
  • Question 5. Behold, my servant shall deal prudently, he shall be exalted and extolled, and be very high. Isaiah 52., 13.
  • Question 6. But thou, Israel, art my servant, Jacob whom I have chosen, the seed of Abraham my friend. Isaiah 41., 8
    6. And he said, It is a light thing that thou shouldest be my servant to raise up the tribes of Jacob, and to restore the preserved of Israel: I will also give thee for a light to the Gentiles, that thou mayest be my salvation unto the end of the earth. 7. Thus saith the LORD, the Redeemer of Israel, and his Holy One, to him whom man despiseth, to him whom the nation abhorreth, to a servant of rulers, Kings shall see and arise, princes also shall worship, because of the LORD that is faithful, and the Holy One of Israel, and he shall choose thee. Isaiah 49., 6, 7.

    Isaiah 53: 1. Who hath believed our report? and to whom is the arm of the LORD revealed? 53: 2 For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him. 53:3 He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not. 53:4 Surely he hath born our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. 53:5 But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed. 53:6 All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. 53:7 He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth. 53:8 He was taken from prison and from judgment: and who shall declare his generation? for he was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression of my people was he stricken. 53:9 And he made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death; because he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth. 53:10 Yet it pleased the LORD to bruise him; he hath put him to grief: when thou shalt make his soul an offering for sin, he shall see his seed, he shall prolong his days, and the pleasure of the LORD shall prosper in his hand. 53:11 He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities. 53:12 Therefore will I divide him a portion with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong; because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors. Isaiah 53.

  • Question 7. Thus saith the LORD to his anointed, to Cyrus, whose right hand I have holden, to subdue nations before him; and I will loose the loins of kings, to open before him the two leaved gates; and the gates shall not be shut;
    Isaiah 45., 1.
  • Question 22. For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us; Ephesians 2., 14.
    And, having made peace through the blood of his cross, by him to reconcile all things unto himself; by him, I say, whether they be things in earth, or things in heaven. Colossians 1., 20.
  • Question 26. Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed. 1 Peter 2., 24.
  • Question 35. God layeth up his iniquity for his children: he rewardeth him, and he shall know it. Job 21., 19.
    And Cain said unto the LORD, My punishment is greater than I can bear. Genesis 4., 13.
    But in the fourth generation they shall come hither again: for the iniquity of the Amorites is not yet full., Genesis 15., 16.
    And when the morning arose, then the angels hastened Lot, saying, Arise, take thy wife, and thy two daughters, which are here; lest thou be consumed in the iniquity of the city. Genesis 19., 15.

  • Fourth Ten - Text 5
  • Question 6. Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth: for the LORD hath spoken, I have nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against me. Isaiah 1., 2.
  • Question 8. Your country is desolate, your cities are burned with fire: your land, strangers devour it in your presence, and it is desolate, as overthrown by strangers.
    And the daughter of Zion is left as a cottage in a vineyard, as a lodge in a garden of cucumbers, as a besieged city. Isaiah 1., 7, 8.
  • Question 9. The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master’s crib: but Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider. Isaiah 1., 3.
  • Question 10. 11. To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? saith the LORD: I am full of the burnt offerings of rams, and the fat of fed beasts; and I delight not in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he goats.
    12. When ye come to appear before me, who hath required this at your hand, to tread my courts?
    13. Bring no more vain oblations; incense is an abomination unto me; the new moons and sabbaths, the calling of assemblies, I cannot away with; it is iniquity, even the solemn meeting. Isaiah 1., 11, 12, 13.
  • Question 12. 16. Wash you, make you clean; put away the evil of your doings from before mine eyes; cease to do evil;
    17. Learn to do well; seek judgment, relieve the oppressed, judge the fatherless, plead for the widow. Isaiah 1., 16, 17.
    Deliver me, O my God, out of the hand of the wicked, out of the hand of the unrighteous and cruel man. Psalm 71., 4. Psalm 71., 4.
  • Question 15. Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him: but I will maintain mine own ways before him. Job 13., 15.
  • Question 31. He giveth snow like wool: he scattereth the hoarfrost like ashes. Psalm 147., 16.
    Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool. Isaiah 1., 18.
    I beheld till the thrones were cast down, and the Ancient of days did sit, whose garment was white as snow, and the hair of his head like the pure wool: his throne was like the fiery flame, and his wheels as burning fire. Daniel 7., 9.
    His head and his hairs were white like wool, as white as snow; and his eyes were as a flame of fire; Revelation 1., 14.
  • Question 32. Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. Psalm 51., 7.
    Her Nazarites were purer than snow, they were whiter than milk, they were more ruddy in body than rubies, their polishing was of sapphire: Lamentations 4., 7.

  • Fourth Ten - Text 6
  • Question 4. My little children, of whom I travail in birth again until Christ be formed in you, Galatians 4., 19.
  • Question 13. But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin. 1 John 1., 7.
    If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 1 John 1., 9.
  • Question 19. 22. But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves.
    25. But whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed. James 1., 22, 25.
  • Question 21. If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. 1 John 1., 8.
  • Question 27. 16. And I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you for ever; 26. But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you. John 14., 16, 26.
    But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, he shall testify of me: John 15., 26.
    Nevertheless I tell you the truth; It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you. John 16., 7.
  • Question 40. 1. My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous: 2. And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for our’s only, but also for the sins of the whole world. 1 John 2., 1, 2.

  • Fourth Ten - Text 7
  • Question 4. And there was there with us a young man, an Hebrew, servant to the captain of the guard; and we told him, and he interpreted to us our dreams; to each man according to his dream he did interpret. Genesis 41., 12.
    But without a parable spake he not unto them: and when they were alone, he expounded all things to his disciples.
    Mark 4., 34.
    But if ye enquire any thing concerning other matters, it shall be determined in a lawful assembly. Acts 19., 39.
  • Question 6. Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. 2 Peter 1., 20.
    For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; 1 Corinthians 15., 3
  • Question 7. We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts: 2 Peter 1., 19.
  • Question 20. But there were false prophets also among the people, even as there shall be false teachers among you, who privily shall bring in damnable heresies, even denying the Lord that bought them, and bring upon themselves swift destruction. 2 Peter 1., 1.
  • Question 30. And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting. Acts 2., 2.
  • Question 37. We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts: 2 Peter 1., 19.

  • Fourth Ten - Text 8
  • Question 1. Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, to the strangers scattered throughout Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, 1:2 Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through sanctification of the Spirit, unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, be multiplied. 1 Peter 1., 1, 2.
  • Question 5. Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever. 1 Peter 1., 23.
  • Question 12. I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service. Romans 12., 1.
  • Question 27. And I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. Matthew 16., 18.

  • Fourth Ten - Text 9
  • No extra references for Text 9.

  • Fourth Ten - Text 10
  • Question 2. According to the grace of God which is given unto me, as a wise masterbuilder, I have laid the foundation, and another buildeth thereon. But let every man take heed how he buildeth thereupon. 1 Corinthians 3., 10.
  • Question 6. For we are laborers together with God: ye are God’s husbandry, ye are God’s building. 1 Corinthians 3., 9.
  • Question 21. Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD, Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste. Isaiah 28., 16.
  • Question 31. Now if any man build upon this foundation gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble;
    1 Corinthians 3., 12.
  • Question 34. 13. Every man’s work shall be made manifest: for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire shall try every man’s work of what sort it is.
    15. If any man’s work shall be burned, he shall suffer loss: but he himself shall be saved; yet so as by fire.
    1 Corinthians 3., 13, 15.

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