The One Hundred Texts - Text Set 5 - 2017 Version.
Swanny's
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The One Hundred Texts

Bible studies for an understanding of Reformation Christianity
Text Set 5 -
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The Text Study Index.
Text Set 1 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 2 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 3 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 4 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 5 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 6 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 7 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 8 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 9 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 10 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


THE ONE HUNDRED TEXTS OF THE SOCIETY FOR IRISH CHURCH MISSIONS.

THE FIFTH TEN

GALATIANS 3., 22.

But the scripture hath concluded all under sin,
that the promise by faith of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe.




Howbeit the scripture hath shut up all things under sin,
that the promise by faith in Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe. - R.V.

But the Scripture has confined all under sin,
that the promise by faith in Jesus Christ might be given to those who believe. - N.K.J.V.

But the Scripture imprisoned everything under sin,
so that the promise by faith in Jesus Christ might be given to those who believe. - E.S.V.

THE FIFTH TEN - TEXT 1.

I. - A Universal Verdict.
  1. Why does our text begin with "But"?
    To establish by way of contrast the truth of the previous verse.
  2. What is the truth of the previous verse?
    That the law is not against the promises of God.
  3. How does Paul show that the law is not against the promises of God?
    By saying " if there had been a law given which could have given life, verily righteousness should have been by the law."
  4. How does he establish the contrast to this?
    By saying, " the scripture hath concluded all under sin."
  5. What does the double statement teach us?
    The law, if it could be obeyed, would save: the promise comes in where the law is broken, not against it, but to give what the law could not.
  6. What fact prevented the law securing righteousness?
    The conclusion of all under sin.
  7. What is meant by the word " concluded "?
    Shut up, brought under the control of anything, like a man put in prison.
  8. What idea does the use of the word " concluded " give us?
    That there is no way of escape. All are hemmed in by sin.
  9. What is meant by saying " All" are thus shut up?
    All human beings and all things that they can do. [The Greek word is all things, every effort of man.]
  10. What is meant by all things being shut up under sin?
    That all things being imperfect and unholy, they come under the dominion and power of sin. The Greek is used of control in
    Luke 7., 8. It may mean shut up beneath sin as a weight, but the context supports the idea that sin is personified as a power exercising its claim through law.
  11. What is sin?
    Any want of conformity unto, or transgression of, the law of God.
  12. What does this truth teach us?
    Both we and all our actions are alike sinful and tainted.
  13. What fact did Paul want to bring out?
    That righteousness cannot be by the law.
  14. If righteousness cannot be by the law what result follows?
    Nothing that we can do can earn or merit it.
II.- A Court of Reference.
  1. To what does the apostle Paul appeal in proof of his contention?
    To the Scripture.
  2. What is the meaning of the word " Scripture "?
    That which is written.
  3. What did Paul mean by " the Scripture"?
    The particular passage from the Old Testament, probably
    Deuteronomy 27., 26, quoted by the Apostle
    (Galatians iii., 10).
  4. Why does he refer to "the Scripture "?
    Because it was recognised as binding by the Jew, and given as such by Paul to the Gentiles.
  5. What other reason might be given for this reference to "the Scripture"?
    It contains God's written judgment on the sin of the world.
  6. What lesson does the appeal to "the Scripturc" teach us?
    That we are to search in God's Word for God's truth.
III. - A Blessed Result.
  1. What does Paul say is the object of the Scripture concluding all under sin?
    "That the promise by faith of Jesus Christ," etc.
  2. What is the promise referred to?
    The promise of justification by faith.
  3. How do we learn this?
    From
    Galatians 3., 11, 12.
  4. How does Paul say the promise comes?
    " By faith of Jesus Christ."
  5. What is the R.V. for ,"By faith," etc.?
    "By faith in Jesus Christ." [The literal Greek is "out of the faith or Jesus Christ".]
  6. What is meant in our text by the words " By faith of Jesus Christ"?
    That's God's promise is given in response to faith in our Lord Jesus Christ and not to works.
  7. How does the last part of the verse help us to understand this?
    It says the promise is " given to them that believe."
  8. What is meant by saying that the Scripture shut us up in order that the promise might be given?
    That we recognize our danger by the witness against sin we fly to the remedy.
  9. Why are the words, "to them that believe," put in the text?
    To teach that we must ourselves trust in the Lord Jesus Christ to get the blessing.
  10. What do the two expressions "By faith" and "To them that believe," tell us of God's salvation?
    It is given solely on account of faith to those who exercise faith.
  11. What is meant by "faith"?
    Trust or confidence. Taking God at His word.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning salvation?
    That faith pre-disposes towards it, the sacraments actually confer it, and our good works develop it.
  2. What did the Galatians, against whom Paul wrote, teach?
    Except ye be circumcised and keep the law of Moses ye cannot be saved.
  3. How does Paul meet their objection?
    By showing that the inheritance is of promise and not of law. .
  4. How does he describe those who seek to add the works of the law to their faith as a title to salvation?
    Galatians 3., 3.
  5. What does Paul mean by "works of the law" Galatians 3., 10?
    Works done to secure righteousness (Galatians 3., 21).
  6. Why cannot the law justify?
    Because it is compelled to condemn (
    Galatians 3., 10, 11).
  7. What is the alternative?
    If we are to be justified we must be justified by faith only (
    Galatians 3., 12, 18, 21, all summed up in
    Galatians 3., 22).
  8. What resemblance is there between Roman teaching and the Galatian error?
    Both think to begin by faith and perfect salvation by other means - sacraments or law, or both.
  9. How does our text condemn this error?
    The promise is not only to those who believe, but it comes out of the faith in Jesus Christ which is the only condition.


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GENESIS 3. 15.

And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed;
it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.




And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed:
it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel. - R.V.

And I will put enmity Between you and the woman, And between your seed and her Seed;
He shall bruise your head, And you shall bruise His heel." - N.K.J.V.

"I will put enmity between you and the woman,
and between your offspring and her offspring;
he shall bruise your head,
and you shall bruise his heel." - E.S.V.

THE FIFTH TEN - TEXT 2.

I. - An Abiding Enmity.
  1. To whom were these words spoken?
    To the serpent.
  2. Who was the Speaker?
    God.
  3. On what occasion were they spoken?
    Immediately after God had found Adam and Eve after they had sinned against Him.
  4. What had the serpent done?
    He had tempted Eve to take of the fruit of the forbidden tree.
  5. What was the result of this temptation?
    Adam and Eve disobeyed God and took the forbidden fruit.
  6. What question did God ask Eve?
    " What is this that thou hast done" (A.V.)? " Why hast thou done this?" (Douay).
  7. What answer did she give?
    " The serpent beguiled [Douay, deceived] me, and I did eat."
  8. What did God say to the serpent?
    Genesis 3., 15.
  9. What is the meaning of the word "enmity"?
    Hatred, continual opposition,
  10. What does this teach us about "the serpent"?
    That it is not a mere serpent that is here represented, but the spirit of evil.
  11. What is meant by "I will put enmity between thee and the woman"?
    That God would interfere so as to make the woman fight against the serpent.
  12. What comfort is there in that judgment on the serpent?
    That though through temptation men fall into sin, God is putting into their minds a hatred of sin.
  13. How do you think this enmity shows itself?
    In the voice of conscience.
  14. What may we learn from these words?
    That dread of sin and of sinful things is planted in our soul by God.
II. - A Protracted Struggle.
  1. What does the text say further?
    " And between thy seed and her seed."
  2. What do we learn from this?
    That the enmity continues all down time.
  3. What is meant by, the seed of the woman?
    Those who are born of women-mankind.
  4. What is meant by, the seed of the serpent?
    Those, whether men or other beings, who become servants of the serpent.
  5. What do the words " thy seed and her seed " teach us?
    That there is a conflict between two classes - servants of God and servants of the serpent.
  6. Why are servants of God spoken of as the seed of the woman?
    Bceause it is through the true seed of the woman they become God's servants.
III. - A- Particular Designation..
  1. Who is the true seed of the woman?
    He who should bruise the serpent's head.
  2. What do the words, "It shall bruise thy head" mean?
    That, finally, there would be a complete victory just as the crushing of a serpent's head destroys his power.
  3. To whom do these words refer?
    To our Lord Jesus Christ.
  4. What is the meaning of the whole text?
    There would be a deadly fight with the serpent, and through one great act the serpent would be completely defeated.
  5. What does the narrowing of the message down to one individual teach us?
    That while God puts enmity in the heart of man against the evil power, only one can really gain the victory - our Lord Jesus Christ
IV. - .A Hint of Suffering.
  1. How does our text show that the victory was not gained without suffering?
    It adds, "And thou shalt bruise his heel."
  2. Why is the heel mentioned?
    Because, in the act of crushing, the heel is represented as injured.
V. - A Complete Deliverance.
  1. What contrast is brought out?
    The contrast between the head and the heel.
  2. What does the contrast teach us?
    That the conqueror suffers pain that can be overcome, but the serpent suffers a vital injury.
  3. How did the serpent briuse our Lord's heel? His contact with sin caused Him to suffer death on the cross.
  4. What great importance attaches to this text? It contains the first promise of the Messiah, and was deiivered immediately after the Fall.
VI. - Error Condemned.
  1. What is the Douay rendering of this text?
    "I will put enmities between thee and the woman, and thy seed and her seed: she shall crush thy head, and thou shalt lie in wait for her heel."
  2. To whom does the Church of Rome refer the promise in the text?
    To Mary, the mother of Jesus.
  3. What was the cause of this error?
    . A good number of Latin MSS. of the Scriptures use the word "ipsa" (she) instead of the word " ipsum " (it) when speaking of the person who was to bruise the serpent's head.
  4. What does the note in the Douay Bible say?
    "Ipsa, the woman, so divers of the fathers read this place, conformably to the Latin: others read it, ipsum, viz., the seed. The sense is the same: for it is by her seed, Jesus Christ, that the woman crushes the serpent's head."
  5. What fact proves that this note is not quite honest?
    The fact that the Douay translators claimed diligently to have compared the Latin Vulgate with the Hebrew.
  6. What would a diligent comparison with the Hebrew have shown?
    That though the pronoun might be so pointed as to signify either " he " or " she," yet the verb is (according to the Hebrew idiom) masculine. [Speaker's Commentary.]
  7. How do the Douay translators themselves illustrate this fact?
    On
    Judges 13., 13. they write: "By the Latin text it is not clear whether this abstinence was prescribed to the mother, or to the child. But the Hebrew (in which the verbs relating thereto are of the feminine gender) determineth to the mother."
  8. What charge, then, can be brought against the Douay translators?
    The charge of concealing the fact that the Hebrew text plainly refers the promise "to the seed of the woman," and not to the woman herself.
  9. Why do we object to the Church of Rome's explanation?
    Because it gives to a human creature the power which belongs only to Him Who is both God and Man.
  10. What passage in the New Testament shows that crushing the spirit of evil is the work of God, not of man?
    Romans 16., 20.


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HEBREWS 2., 14, 15.

Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil;
And deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage.




Since then the children are sharers in flesh and and blood, he also himself in like manner partook of the same; that through death he might bring to nought him that had the power of death, that is, the devil;
And might deliver all them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. - R.V.

Inasmuch then as the children have partaken of flesh and blood, He Himself likewise shared
in the same, that through death He might destroy him who had the power of death, that is, the devil,
and release those who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. - N.K.J.V.

Since therefore the children share in flesh and blood, he himself likewise partook of the same things, that through death he might destroy the one who has the power of death, that is, the devil,
and deliver all those who through fear of death were subject to lifelong slavery. - E.S.V.

THE FIFTH TEN - TEXT 3.

I. - An Identity of Nature.
  1. What are the opening words of our text?
    " Forasmuch then."
  2. What do they tell us?
    That the text is a conclusion from what goes before.
  3. What goes before the text?
    The statement that He that sanctifieth and they that are sanctified are all of one. (
    Hebrews 2., 11.)
  4. What is meant by " He that sanctifieth," etc.?
    That God sent our Lord Jesus Christ, and through Him brings many sons into relation to Himself.
  5. What quotation from the Old Testament is given to show our Lord's identification with those He redeemed?
    Hebrews 2., 13. (Quoting Isaiah 8., 18.)
  6. What did this identification involve?
    The taking of flesh and blood.
  7. Why does our text say that our Lord took flesh and blood?
    Because the children were partakers of the same.
  8. What does flesh and blood stand for?
    Human nature in its fulness.
  9. What does the R.V. marg. read?
    " Blood and flesh."
  10. Whv is the word " blood " placed first?
    Probably because it is the source of life. [Dehtzsch sees a reference to our Lord's blood shedding.]
  11. Who are meant by the children?
    Those whom our Lord will bring to glory (
    Hebrews 2., 10.)
  12. What is said of the children?
    They "are partakers of flesh and blood."
  13. What is R.V. for partakers?
    " Sharers.
  14. What is said of our Lord?
    He took part of the same.
  15. What difference is implied by the change in the words "sharers" and "partook" (R.V.)?
    That what the children had by a common nature our Lord freely took in order to be like them.
  16. What does this teach us?
    That our Lord existed previously in another state to that of flesh and blood. (But, see note, "Partakers.")
  17. Why is the word "likewise" added?
    To show that our Lord's taking of human nature was in every respect as real as the possession of human nature by the children.
II. - A Definite Object.
  1. With what object did our Lord take flesh and blood?
    "That through death," ere.
  2. What does this teach us about the death of our Lord?
    That from the very beginning it was the object of His coming into the world.
  3. What object had our Lord in dying?
    To destroy him that had the power of death.
  4. What is the R.V. for destroy?
    " Bring to nought."
  5. What is the meaning of this?
    That by His death our Lord ruined the power ot Satan.
  6. What is meant by having "the power of death"?
    Having the control of, or dominion over, death.
  7. What is the reading of the Douay version?
    " The empire of death."
  8. What are we to understand by the saying, " Him that had the power of death"?
    Because of man's sin the devil has such control over death as to cast men into its bondage.
III. - An Evil Personality.
  1. What does the reference to the devil and his dominion teach us?
    That we have to do with a being who is hostile to us and to God.
  2. What is the meaning of the word "devil"?
    Slanderer, false accuser (from the Greek, throw over, cast upon, slander, accuse).
IV. - A Great Deliverance.
  1. What is the object of our Lord taking flesh and blood?
    To destroy the devil.
  2. What does the word here used for "destroy" mean?
    To bring to nought, render useless (compare
    Luke 13., 7; Romans 6., 6.)
  3. How did our Lord destroy him?
    Through death.
  4. What does this teach us about the death of our Lord?
    That He underwent death to defeat the devil.
  5. What result followed from the defeat of the devil?
    He delivered " them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage."
  6. What is meant by, " through fear of death .. . subject to bondage "?
    Men, knowing they are sinners, dread the penalty of sin - death and are held in slavery all their days.
  7. What does our Lord do for such?
    He delivers from the fear of death.
  8. How does our Lord deliver from the fear of death?
    By leading us to trust in Him Whose death satisfied for sin and brought to nought the sway of the devil by means of death.
  9. Why, then, do Christians die?
    Because God permits sin to work out its course in our bodies, but only that death may become the entrance to life (compare
    1 Corinthians 15..)
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. Whom does the Church of Rome represent as crushing the head of the serpent, destroying the power of the devil?
    Mary, the mother of Jesus
  2. Who destroyed the power of the devil according to our text?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  3. By what means?
    Through His death.
  4. How does this show us that the Church of Rome is wrong?
    Only One died for sin, only One therefore by His death could bring to nought the devil. That One was Jesus, not Mary.


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1 PETER 1., 18, 19.

Forasmuch as ye know that ye were not redeemed with corruptible things as silver and gold,
from your vain conversation received by tradition from your fathers;
But with the precious Blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot:




Knowing that ye were redeemed, not with corruptible things, with silver or gold,
from your vain manner of life handed down from your fathers;
but with precious blood, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot, even the blood of Christ: - R.V.

Knowing that you were not redeemed with corruptible things, like silver or gold,
from your aimless conduct received by tradition from your fathers,
but with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot. - N.K.J.V.

Knowing that you were ransomed from the futile ways inherited from your forefathers,
not with perishable things such as silver or gold, but with the precious blood of Christ,
like that of a lamb without blemish or spot. - E.S.V.

THE FIFTH TEN - TEXT 4.

I. - A Great Fact.
  1. Who wrote these words?
    The apostle Peter.
  2. To whom did he write them?
    See
    1 Peter 1., 1.
  3. What was his object in writing?
    To encourage his readers in the Christian walk.
  4. What has Peter to say about their manner of life?
    1 Peter 1., 15.
  5. What does Peter say about God the Father?
    1 Peter 1., 17.
  6. What effect ought the truth of God's judgment to have upon us?
    1 Peter 1., 17.
  7. What is meant there by "fear"?
    Sometimes it means terror (as
    Matthew 14., 26. - 28., 4; Hebrews 2., 15.) Sometimes dread of giving displeasure: reverence (Acts 9,. 31; Revelation 19., 5.) In this place, dread of displeasing God, holy reverence, and carefulness.
  8. What is the first motive for fear mentioned by Peter?
    The fact that God the Father judgeth according to each man's work.
  9. What motive does our text supply?
    " Ye know." Knowing etc (R.V.).
  10. How does the fact that we were redeemed by the precious blood of Christ lead us to pass the time of our sojourning here in fear.?
    It shows the greatness of the sacrifice which had to be made for our redemption, and therefore the great importance of holiness.
  11. What then, is the effect of knowledge of redemption?
    It makes us watchful over our conduct.
  12. To what great fact does Peter allude?
    To the fact that his readers were redeemed.
  13. What is meant by " redeemed "?
    Bought back, delivered by purchase.
  14. What price was paid for our redemption?
    The precious blood cf Christ.
  15. To what is our Lord Jesus Christ compared?
    To " a Lamb without blemish and without spot."
  16. Of what does the comparison of our Lord to a Lamb remind us?
    Of the Old Testament sacrifices for sin.
  17. What is meant by "without blemish"?
    Having no inherent defect. [The sinlessness of our Lord. " Jesus Christ had no spot in Himself." - Bengel.]
  18. What is meant by "without spot"?
    Without contracting any defilement. [The continued holiness of our Lord. "Neither did he contract outside stain" - Bengel.]
  19. How is the blood of our Lord Jesus described?
    "The precious blood."
  20. What is meant by " precious "?
    Of great value, beyond price.
II. - A Great Contrast.
  1. With what is the price of our redemption contrasted?
    Corruptible things.
  2. What is meant by "corruptible"?
    That which perishes.
  3. To what Old Testament usage is there probably a reference?
    To the half-shekel paid for the Israelites
    (Exodus 30., 12-16), or the five shekels for the first born
    (Numbers 3., 44-47 et seq.).
  4. What is the object of introducing this contrast?
    To show how immeasurably great is the purchase paid for us.
  5. Why could not corruptible things redeem us?
    Because we require spiritual deliverance and the inheritance is incorruptible.
III. - A Great Deliverance.
  1. From what were those to whom Peter wrote delivered?
    From their vain conversation.
  2. What is meant by "conversation"?
    Manner of life. [Note. The word " conversation " in
    Philippians 3., 20 is quite different.]
  3. What is meant by the word " vain" ?
    Useless, unprofitable.
  4. What led them to adopt this useless manner of life?
    It was handed down from their fathers.
  5. Against what does this warn us?
    The idea that a custom or religion must he right if it is the custom or religion of our forefathers. ["Men all too readily and willingly cling to the paths of their fathers in religion, and especially the Jews." - Bengel]
  6. What is R.V. for " received by tradition from your fathers"?
    "Handed down from your fathers."
  7. How did Peter himself describe this manner of life?
    Acts 15., 10.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What was the error of the Jews' vain manner of life?
    They made void the Commandment of God by their tradition (
    Matthew 15., 2-6.)
  2. In what particular did they err most grievously?
    They multiplied unimportant observances and made them conditions of salvation (
    Mark 7., 3-14.)
  3. Why were all such observances "vain"?
    They only produced ceremonial strictness, not true holiness.
  4. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning observances?
    That by means of them justification is increased.
  5. What effect has this upon Roman Catholics?
    It makes them imitate the example of the Jews and multiply observances.
  6. How does the Prayer Book refer to this?
    "Some are put away, because the great excess and multitude of them hath so increased in these latter days, that the burthen of them was intolerable"; etc. Concerning Ceremonies (1519).
  7. What do Roman Catholics seek to earn by observances?
    An Indulgence.
  8. What is an Indulgence?
    A remission in whole or in part of the temporal punishment due to sin.


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HEBREWS 9., 22.

And almost all things are by the law purged with blood; and without shedding of blood is no remission.




And according to the law, I may almost say, all things are cleansed with blood, and apart
from shedding of blood there is no remission. - R.V.

And according to the law almost all things are purified with blood, and without
shedding of blood there is no remission. - N.K.J.V.

Indeed, under the law almost everything is purified with blood, and without
the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins. - E.S.V.

THE FIFTH TEN - TEXT 5.

I. - The Evidence of the Law.
  1. To what do the words "all things" refer?
    To the Jewish tabernacle and all the vessels of the ministry (
    Hebrews 9., 21.)
  2. What is said about them?
    They are purged with blood,
  3. What is the meaning of the word " purged " ?
    Cleansed (so as to be fit for cercmonial use).
  4. How was this cleansing carried out?
    Hebrews 9., 21.
  5. Why had they to be thus cleansed?
    By the Law.
  6. What is meant by the words " By the Law " ?
    According to the rules laid down in the Law.
  7. What was the Law?
    The regulations and doctrine given by God to Moses.
  8. What are the three parts of the Law?
    Civil, ceremonial, moral.
  9. What is meant by the Civil Law of Moses?
    That part of the regulations which referred to the manner of life in Israel. [Parapets on houses, year of Jubilee, law of slaves, etc.]
  10. What is meant by the ceremonial law?
    That part which had reference to public worship and the regula- tions of sacrifice.
  11. What is meant by the moral law?
    The requirements of God concerning our duty to Him and to our neighbour.
  12. What does Article VII., say concerning this law?
    " Although the Law given from God by Moses, as touching Ceremonies and Rites, do not bind Christian men, nor the Civil precepts thereof ought of necessity to be received in any commonwealth; yet notwithstanding, no Christian man whatsoever is free from the obedience of the Commandments which are called Moral."
  13. To what part of the law is reference made in our text?
    Cercmonial.
  14. What is the object of the reference?
    To show that the first covenant was dedicated with blood.
II. - The Significance of this Evidence.
  1. What is the value of this evidence?
    It enables us to understand the need of sacrifice.
  2. About what great sacrifice had the writer been speaking?
    The sacrifice of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  3. What does he tell us about our Lord Jesus Christ?
    He is a High Priest, of a greater tabernacle, and with His own blood hath obtained eternal redemption.
  4. What are we meant to learn by these contrasts and comparisons?
    That the New Covenant is immeasurably greater than the old.
  5. What comparison is insisted on in our text?
    " Almost all things are by the law purged with blood."
  6. Why does he say "Almost all things" ?
    Because there is an exception.
  7. What is the exception?
    Leviticus 5., 11-13.
  8. What is R.V. for "Almost" ?
    : "I may almost say."
  9. What then, is the argument of the text?
    In the law blood is the almost universal medium of cleansing and forgiveness.
  10. What is proved by this fact?
    That it is not contrary to God's provision that our Lord Jesus Christ should procure eternal redemption by His blood.
III. - The Object of Blood-shedding.
  1. What are the two purposes accomplished by means of blood?
    Cleansing and remission.
  2. Why are "things" cleansed?
    To show that thev are set apart from all sinful connections and devoted to a holy purpose.
  3. What did this action teach the people?
    The very great holiness of God.
  4. What is meant by "remission" ?
    Release from debt or obligation. Putting away tne punishment due to sin.
  5. What is said about remission?
    "Without shedding of blood," etc.
  6. What is meant by " without"?
    Apart from.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning the Mass?
    That it is a true, proper, and propitiatory sacrifice.
  2. What does the Church of Rome mean by "propitiatory"?
    Possessing power to induce God to put away sin and look with favour on the sinner.
  3. What is necessary if God is to look with favour on the sinner?
    Remission of sin.
  4. What does the text tell us about remission?
    "Without" etc
  5. Why cannot the Mass score remission?
    There is no shedding of blood in it.
  6. How is this shown by the name given to the Mass in the Church of Rome?
    It is called "The unbloody sacrifice."
  7. What unbloody sacrifices are commanded in the New Testament?
    The sacrifice of ourselves for service; also prayer, praise and thanks-giving.
  8. What other sacrifice is spoken of in the New Testament?
    The sacrifice of our Lord Jesus Christ on the cross.
  9. What is the difference between these two kinds of sacrifice?
    The unbloody sacrifices are expressions of our gratitude and service, accepted because of the sacrifice of our Lord Jesus Christ which is the only one that can take away sin.
  10. Why, then, do we reject the sacrifice of the Mass?
    Because it dishonours our Lord's great sacrifice and contradicts the truth that eternal redemption is obtained by His blood.


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HEBREWS 4., 15, 16.

For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.




For we have not a high priest that cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but one that hath been in all points tempted like as weare, yet without sin. Let us therefore draw near with boldness unto the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy, and may find grace to help us in time of need. - R.V.

For we do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in all points
tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly to the throne of grace,
that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need. - N.K.J.V.

For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need. - E.S.V.

THE FIFTH TEN - TEXT 6.

I. - A Compassionate High Priest.
  1. What is our Lord Jesus Christ called in our text?
    A High Priest.
  2. Why is our lord spoken of as a High Priest?
    Because He fulfilled the type of the High Priest in the O.T.
  3. What are we told about our High Priest?
    He can be touched with the feeling of our infirmities.
  4. Why are we told that He can be touched, etc.?
    To encourage us to come to Him notwithstanding His greatness.
  5. What were the readers exhorted to do?
    To hold fast their confession (R;V.
    Hebrews 4., 14.)
  6. What is meant by holding fast our confession?
    To maintain a true witness to our Lord "Jesus Christ..
  7. How is the greatness of our Lord Jesus expressed?
    He is spoken of as " the Son of God " (
    Hebrews 4., 14.)
  8. What is meant by " not a High Priest which cannot be touched," etc.?
    That our Lord Jesus can feel and understand our difficulties. (The Greek is the root from which comes our word " sympathy." See Note, "An High Priest.")
  9. What is meant by the word " infirmities" ?
    Weaknesses, whether bodily or mental.
  10. What lesson is taught us in these words?
    That our High Priest, Who is so great, pities our weakness and understands it.
II. - A Saviour Who Understood Temptation.
  1. What proof is given that our Lord can understand our weakness?
    He "was in all points tempted."
  2. What change is made in R.V.?
    " Hath been in all points tempted."
  3. What does the change suggest to us?
    That our Lord had gone through all these trials while on earth, and was no longer subject to temptation.
  4. How is the fulness of our Lord's sympathy assured?
    He was tempted " in all points,"
  5. What is meant by "in all points"?
    In all things or in every respect.
  6. What difference is there between our Lord's temptation and our own?
    His temptation was without sin.
  7. What does " without " mean?
    Apart from.
  8. What is the resemblance between our Lord's temptation and ours?
    He was tempted " like as we are."
  9. What two great truths are taught us in these words?
    Our Lord was truly tempted, our Lord was wholly free from sin.
  10. What is meant by " like as we are"?
    In a way that resembles our temptation. [Greek is according to the resemblance]
III. - A Definite Encouragement to Believers.
  1. What does this fact enable us to do?
    To come boldly, etc.
  2. To what are we invited to come boldly?
    To " the throne of grace."
  3. What is meant by " the throne of grace " ?
    The seat from which God freely bestows His gifts.
  4. Why can we come with boldness?
    Because our great High Priest Who is there can sympathise with us.
  5. What truth are we taught in these words?
    That grace is offered not to the strong, but for those who feel their own weakness.
IV. - A Definite Object in Coming to the Throne of Grace.
  1. For what are we to comc to the throne of grace?
    To obtain mercy and grace.
  2. What is meant by " mercy "?
    Pity or compassion.
  3. What is meant by "grace" ?
    God's free favour or help.
  4. What is R.V. for "obtain mercy"?
    "Receive mercy."
  5. What idea does this give us?
    That our Lord has shown His pity for us, and it is our duty to take it from His hands.
  6. What is meant by "find grace to help" ?
    That when any trouble comes to us we discover that God's power is present to help.
  7. What is meant by "help in time of need "?
    Help when we require it. [" Seasonable help," from Greek]
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does our text invite us to do?
    Come boldly unto the throne of grace.
  2. On what ground are we invited?
    On the ground that our Lord knows our weakness.
  3. What position does this give our Lord?
    The position of a High Priest Who pleads for us.
  4. What is the Roman argument for the intercession of saints?
    That they as holier than ourselves can approach God and intercede for us.
  5. What claim is urged in our text for the approach to God?
    The claim that our Lord is touched with our infirmities and that gives us boldness.
  6. What does it further tell us about our Lord's capacity to feel for us?
    He was tempted in all points.
  7. In what respects therefore is our Lord superior to the saints?
    He knows us better than they and He has the right to plead for us by His merits.
  8. Why do we object to the intercession of saints?
    It turns our thoughts away from the One Who can help, to those who cannot.


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EPHESIANS 2., 18.

For through him we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father.




For through him we both have our access in one Spirit unto the Father. - R.V.

For through Him we both have access by one Spirit to the Father. - N.K.J.V.

For through him we both have access in one Spirit to the Father. - E.S.V.

THE FIFTH TEN - TEXT 7.

I. - A Medium.
  1. To Whom do the words "through Him" refer?
    To our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. What had the apostle Faul been saying about our Lord Jesus Christ?
    That He, our peace, reconciled Jew and Gentile to God, and came and preached peace. (
    Ephesians 2., 14-17).
  3. By what means did our Lord Jesus Christ accomplish this great work?
    By His blood
    (Epesians 2., 13).
  4. What are we told is the effect of Christ's shed blood?
    We are made nigh to God "by" or " in" (R.V.) His blood.
  5. How is this nearness to God further explained?
    Ephesians 2., 15.
  6. Why is " the law of commandments " spoken of as " the enmity " ?
    Because our failure to fulfil God's law exposes us to His wrath, and causes conflict between us and God's will.
  7. How did our Lord abolish " in His flesh the enmity "?
    He fulfilled the law for us and satisfied its demands, so-making peace.
  8. In what position does the text place our Lord?
    As the One through Whom we have access, or right of approach.
  9. Why can this right of approach be secured to us by none other?
    Because it was only by His sacrifice of Himself that our Lord became our means of approach and no one else bore our sins or satisfied for them.
  10. What is meant by " through Him"?
    By means of Him. [Greek with Genitive.]
II. - An Entrance.
  1. What did our Lord secure for us?
    Access.
  2. What is meant by "access"?
    Right of approach, introduction.
  3. What is the R.V. here?
    " Our access."
  4. Where does our Lord Himself speak of the means of coming to the Father?
    John 14., 6. (First Ten - Text 2, p. 5.)
  5. What does Paul say about the Ephesians?
    They had access.
  6. What truth does this teach us?
    That it is possible to have knowledge that the way to God's Presence is open to us and that we approach Him.
  7. Who are said to have this " access" ?
    "We both."
  8. To whom do the words "we both" refer?
    To Jews and Gentiles.
  9. To what previous words of Paul do the words "we both" refer?
    To the breaking down of the middle wall of partition (
    Ephesians 2., 14).
  10. What two ideas are contained in Paul's teaching?
    That Jews and Gentiles were no longer divided and that the wider separation between all men and God has been removed.
  11. What is the effect of this "access"?
    Ephesians 2., 19.
III. - A Condition.
  1. What else are we told about our access?
    It is " by one Spirit."
  2. What is R.V. for "by one Spirit"?
    " In one Spirit."
  3. What is the meaning of " access in one Spirit" ?
    The proper condition of approaching God is wrought in us by the Holy Spirit.
  4. What does the work of the Spirit accomplish in us?
    It creates a longing for God and a desire to do His will.
IV. - An Objective.
  1. To Whom are we said to have access?
    To the Father.
  2. Why is God spoken of as Father?
    Because by the work of our Lord Jesus Christ we are made children of God.
  3. What does the word "Father" suggest to us about our access?
    That it is admittance into the Presence of One Who loves us and cares for us.
  4. What relation is there between the nature of father and son?
    A father and son have the same nature.
  5. How is this common narure secured to us when we come to our heavenly Father?
    By the fact that we come in one Spirit.
  6. What name is given to the change of nature by which we are made like God?
    Regeneration.
  7. How many Persons of the Godhead are mentioned in the text?
    Three.
  8. What is the doctrine of Three Persons in one God called?
    The doctrine of the Trinity.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does our text teach us?
    That Father, Spirit, and Son are all concerned with our salvation.
  2. What may we learn from the fact that no others are mentioned here?
    That the whole work of salvation and approach to God is accomplished by the Sacred Trinity.
  3. What does the Church of Rome teach about access to God?
    That it is made possible by the intercession of saints.
  4. What does our text teach us?
    That access is through our Lord Jesus Christ.
  5. How do we learn it is through Him alone?
    By the fact that it was secured through His death.
  6. How do we know that this is the privilege of all men?
    It is spoken of as a right belonging to Jews and Gentiles.
  7. How does our text contradict Rome's teaching?
    It sets out Jesus as the only means of approach to God and gives all men alike perfect access through Him, making no distinction between those called saints by Rome and ordinary believers.


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GOSPEL of MATTHEW 22., 29.

Jesus Answered and said unto them, Ye do err, not knowing the scriptures nor the power of God.




But Jesus answered and said unto them, Ye do err, not knowing the scriptures, nor the power of God. - R.V.

Jesus answered and said to them, "You are mistaken, not knowing the Scriptures nor the power of God. - N.K.J.V.

But Jesus answered them, "You are wrong, because you know neither the Scriptures nor the power of God." - E.S.V.

THE FIFTH TEN - TEXT 8.

I. - Error Rebuked.
  1. Who spoke these words?
    Our Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. To whom were they spoken?
    The Sadducees.
  3. Who were the Sadducees?
    A sect of the Jews.
  4. How were they distinguished from other Jewish sects?
    They denied the immortality of the soul and future retribution, believed neither in angels nor spirit, denied the resurrection, and held the freedom of the will in a form that denied God's absolute predestination.
  5. Which of their opinions is here condemned?
    Their denial of the Resurrection.
  6. What led our Lord to say "Ye do err" ?
    The question concerning the woman who had had seven husbands.
  7. What difficulty concerning the woman did they raise?
    Whose wife should she be in the Resurrection.
  8. What was the object of their question?
    To show that the resurrection was not possible.
  9. What do the words " Ye do err " teach us?
    That our Lord definitely taught the resurrection from the dead.
  10. What is the meaning of "Ye do err" ?
    Ye have been led astray.
  11. What led the Sadducees astray?
    The fact that their minds were ill-informed.
  12. What lesson does this teach us?
    That we should watch against errors in reasoning due to lack of knowledge.
  13. What was the error in the reasoning of the Sadducees?
    They thought that in the resurrection people must live in all respects as they had lived here.
  14. What warning does our Lord's rebuke give us?
    That arguments based on present experience cannot always be relied upon (e.g. as is done in Chambers, Life after Death).
II - Its Cause Assigned.
    (a) Ignorance of the Scriptures.
  1. What was the cause of the error of the Sadducees?
    Repeat text.
  2. Why was the rebuke about the Scriptures especially pointed?
    They professed to get their argument from the Scriptures (
    Deuteronomy 25., 5, 6).
  3. What would our Lord's rebuke mean?
    You quote the Scriptures but you do not understand them.
  4. Against what abuse of the Scriptures does this warn us?
    Against quibbling about the words of the Bible instead of seeking the truth the Bible teachcs.
  5. What is meant by "Scriptures" ?
    Writings.
  6. To what writings is the word here confined?
    To the writings of the Old Testament.
  7. What name do we give to the Old and New Testaments?
    The Bible.
  8. What does the word " Bible" mean?
    Book, or Books.
  9. What, then, is meant by singling out one volume as "The Book." That it contains the writings of all writings, or is the Book of all books.
  10. What do these words of our Lord prove. That He put a special value on the Scriptures.
  11. What do His words teach us?
    That truth is found by a careful study of the Scriptures.

    (b) Ignorance of the Power of God.
  12. To what else does our Lord refer?
    " The power of God."
  13. What was the error of the Sadducees in this respect?
    They measured God's power by their reasoning.
  14. To what example of Gods power did our Lord direct attention?
    To the creation of angels.
  15. What error of the Sadducees did He thus condemn?
    Their denial of angels or spirit.
  16. What does our Lord show them?
    That denying one form of God's creative power they employ this error to condemn a fact of His revealing. (There cannot be angels......in the resurrection there must be marriage.)
  17. How does our Lord convict them of ignorance of the Scriptures?
    By quoting Moses, to whom they referred, against them.
  18. What does this quotation teach us?
    That the message of God often lies below the surface of Scripture.
III - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning the reading of the Scriptures?
    That they are not to be given to all except with great precautions.
  2. What does this incident prove?
    That the Old Testament was in the hands of the Jews.
  3. Why does our Lord blame the Sadducees?
    Because they did not know that which was spoken to them by God.
  4. What do we learn from these words?
    That God's message is for lay people.
  5. What else does our Lord teach?
    Thar if they had carefully read the Old Testament, they would not have been in error.
  6. How does this differ from Rome's teaching?
    She says error comes from reading the Scriptures.
  7. When was the use of the Scriptures in the vulgar tongue first forbidden?
    Council of Toulouse (Tolosa), 1229.
  8. What resulted, and how do we know it was bound to result?
    Error; because our Lord said. "Ye do err," etc.


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ISAIAH 55., 1.

Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters, and he that hath no money;
come ye, buy, and eat; yea, come, buy wine and milk without money and without price.




Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters, and he that hath no money;
come ye, buy, and eat; yea, come, buy wine and milk without money and without price. - R.V.

"Ho! Everyone who thirsts, Come to the waters; And you who have no money,
Come, buy and eat. Yes, come, buy wine and milk without money and without price. - N.K.J.V.

Come, everyone who thirsts,
come to the waters;
and he who has no money,
come, buy and eat!
Come, buy wine and milk
without money and without price. - E.S.V.

THE FIFTH TEN - TEXT 9.

I. - A General Invitation.
  1. How does our text begin?
    With the word " Ho."
  2. For what purpose is the word "Ho" employed?
    To call the earnest attention of the hearers to the message.
  3. Why is there such need of earnest attention?
    Because of the greatness of the promise.
  4. To whom is the invitation addressed?
    To everyone who thirsteth.
  5. What is meant by "everyone"?
    All without distinction.
  6. What does this invitation teach us?
    That the blessings of God are free to all.
  7. What does the limitation to those who thirst teach?
    That there must be a sense of need before the invitation is heeded.
II. - To Particular Classes.
  1. How else are those invited described?
    As those that have no money.
  2. What does the description " he that hath no money" teach?
    That those who are invited are unable to help themselves.
  3. How can we combine these two in a description of sinners?
    Sinners are conscious of need and are unable to satisfy it of themselves.
III. - A Blessing Procurable.
  1. To what are the thirsty invited?
    To the waters.
  2. What is meant by the waters?
    That which satisfies thirst - the blessings of the Gospel.
  3. Why have we waters - the plural form?
    To emphasise the many blessings of the New Covenant.
  4. What blessings have been mentioned before?
    Peace(
    Isaiah 54., 10), security(Isaiah 54., 14), knowledge (Isaiah 54., 13), righteousness (Isaiah 54., 17)
  5. What else are the hearers invited to procure?
    Wine and milk.
  6. What is the significance of wine and milk?
    They gladden and sustain.
  7. How may we combine the two ideas of blessing offered to sinners?
    They are offered satisfaction and sustenance.
  8. What command is given them?
    They are exhorted to " buy."
  9. What is meant by the command to "buy"?
    To make our own. Appropriate for ourselves, like a purchased article.
  10. What other exhortation is given?
    To eat.
  11. What are we to understand by eating?
    Employing for our spiritual needs.
  12. What lesson do these two commands teach us?
    That spiritual blessings must be received and acted upon if they are to do us any good.
IV. - On Generous Terms.
  1. On what terms are the waters, wine, and milk, offered?
    " Without money and without price."
  2. Why are the words, "without price," added?
    To show the entire freeness of the offer. [Vulgate Latin, absque ulla commutattone.]
  3. What class of people are invited to buy?
    Those who are thirsty and have no money.
  4. What kind of things are offered for sale?
    The things they need - water, milk, wine.
  5. What do the words, "without money and without price," teach to the thirsty and the penniless?
    That their need and want is no bar to their receiving a supply.
  6. What is the name commonly given to God's free favour?
    Grace.
  7. What does this text teach about the blessings of the New Covenant?
    They are all of grace.
  8. Why is it necessary that God's blessings should be "without money and wilhout price" ?
    Because they are priceless in themselves and we have nothing to bring Him but our need.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. How does the Church of Rome say that salvation is procured?
    Through the sacraments.
  2. What sacraments give life to the soul according to her teaching?
    Baptism and Pemnce.
  3. What does she teach about Baptism?
    That faith and virtue predipose those who have them for the blessing of Baptism.
  4. What does she teach concerning Penance?
    That works of charity and godly disposition avail to clear away the penalty due to lesser faults and the temporal punishment due to mortal sin.
  5. What two kinds of human merit does she speak about?
    Merit of Congruity and merit of Condignity.
  6. What is meant by merit of Congruity?
    That while there is no ground in justice for God to reward virtuous actions done apart from His grace, it is in accordance with His holy nature to do so.
  7. What is meant by merit of Condignity?
    That some human actions are such as to demand a reward in strict justice.
  8. Why do we reject these two motives of merit?
    Because we are warned in Scripture that we can bring nothing to God that either invites or secures blessing except our need.
  9. But does not God reward the works of His servants?
    God rewards even as God gives grace, but we do not merit either reward or grace.
  10. How does our text teach this?
    "Without money and without price."


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HEBREWS 10., 14.

For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.




For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. - R.V.

For by one offering He has perfected forever those who are being sanctified. - N.K.J.V.

For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are being sanctified. - E.S.V.

THE FIFTH TEN - TEXT 10.

I. An Offering Once for All.
  1. Why does this text begin with "For" ?
    Because it gives a reason for what goes before.
  2. What goes before?
    . The statement that our Lord offered one sacrifice tor sins tor ever.
  3. With what is our Lord's sacrifice contrasted?
    With the sacrifices offered under the Old Law..
  4. What are we told about the sacrifices of the Old Law?
    They could never take away sins.
  5. What is the contrast between our Lord's sacrifice and the sacrifices of the Old Law?
    His was offered once for all; they were offered oftentimes,
  6. What contrast is introduced between the priests of the Old Law and our Lord?
    They stand offering (
    Hebrews 10., 11). He, having offered, sat down (Hebrews 10., 12).
  7. What does our Lord's sitting down imply?
    That He had finished the work of sacrificing.
  8. What does our text tell us?
    " By one offering," etc." Offering," here?
    Something presented to God.
  9. What is the meaning of the word, "Offering," here?
    Something presented to God.
  10. What did our Lord offer to God?
    His body (
    Hebrews 10., 10;), Himself (Hebrews 9., 26)
  11. How is our Lord's " offering " described?
    As " one " offering.
  12. What is conveyed by the word "one"?
    An offering made once for all.
  13. With what is the one offering contrasted?
    With the many offerings of the Jewish priest.
II. - A Perfected Salvation.
  1. How is the sufficiency of the one offering expressed?
    It is said by it He " perfected for ever them that are sanctified."
  2. What is meant by " perfected " ?
    Brought to full accomplishment. Done all that was necessary.
  3. How is the force of the word "perfected," strengthened?
    By adding the words, " for ever."
  4. What is the meaning of "for ever" ?
    Unto the very end. All the way.
  5. What lesson do these words, "for ever," teach us?
    That our Lord's offering avails throughout our whole journey.
  6. What do we learn from the statement that our Lord's offering perfects for ever?
    That all we have of spiritual grace comes through the sacrifice of our Lord Jesus Christ.
  7. What tense is " hath perfected " ?
    Perfect tense.
  8. What does the perfect tense speak of?
    An action completed in the past.
  9. What does this reference to a completed action teach us?
    That our Lord settled the question of sin once for all.
  10. How far do the words, "for ever," carry us?
    To the second coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, when His work will be finally complete.
III. - A Particular Class.
  1. Who are those who are perfected?
    Those who are sanctified.
  2. What is meant by sanctified?
    Separated unto God and therefore made holy.
  3. What does the addition of the words, "them that are sanctified," That the offering of Christ has for its end the separation of men unto God.
  4. What truth is thus brought home to us?
    That we are not the subject of our Lord's sacrifice unless we are moving towards holiness.
  5. What contrast is there between the word, "perfected," and the the word "sanctified"?
    The one refers to a completed act, and the other to a process that goes on ("them that are being sanctified").
  6. What does this contrast teach us?
    That our Lord applies the benefit of His redemption continually to those who are the subjects of redemption.
  7. What explanation is added of our Lord's application of redemption?
    Hebrews 10., 16, 17, 18.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach concerning the Mass?
    That in it the priest offers up our Lord to God the Father as a sacrifice to obtain remission of pain and guilt.
  2. What is the relation of the Mass to the sacrifice of the Cross according to Rome?
    The Victim is the same, the sacrifice is the same, the manner of offering alone being different.
  3. What is the difference in the manner of offering?
    The sacrifice of the Cross was offered in a bloody manner, that of the Mass in an unbloody manner.
  4. How does the Church of Rome try to avoid the charge of repeating our Lord's sacrifice?
    By saying the Mass does not repeat, but only continues our Lord's sacrifice.
  5. How would you show that this argument does not remove the objection?
    Because the contrast in the Hebrews is between continued sacrifices and a sacrifice offered once for all.
  6. How is this contrast brought out?
    The priest is said to offer continually the same sacrifices.
  7. How is the completion of our Lord's sacrifice emphasised?
    It is said He sat down at the right hand of God.
  8. How does the Epistle to the Hebrews destroy the idea of the sacrifice of the Mass?
    It says our Lord offered one offering, sat down after ottering, perfected for ever by one offering.
  9. How does our Article XXXI. describe "sacrifices of Masses"?
    As "blasphemous fables, and dangerous deceits."
  10. How does our text destroy the idea that the Mass applies the benefits of our Lord's redemption?
    By attaching the blessing of sanctification to the one offering.

Additional Texts Mentioned in the Study Questions

Fifth Ten - Text 1
  • Question 10. For I also am a man set under authority, having under me soldiers, and I say unto one, Go, and he goeth; and to another, Come, and he cometh; and to my servant, Do this, and he doeth it. Luke 7., 8.
  • Question 17. Cursed be he that confirmeth not all the words of this law to do them. And all the people shall say, Amen. Deuteronomy 27., 26.
    For as many as are of the works of the law are under the curse: for it is written, Cursed is every one that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them. Galatians 3., 10.
  • Question 23. But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith.
    12. And the law is not of faith: but, The man that doeth them shall live in them. Galatians 3., 11, 12.
  • Question 36. For as many as are of the works of the law are under the curse: for it is written, Cursed is every one that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them.Galatians 3., 10.
    Is the law then against the promises of God? God forbid: for if there had been a law given which could have given life, verily righteousness should have been by the law. Galatians 3., 21.
  • Question 37. For as many as are of the works of the law are under the curse: for it is written, Cursed is every one that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them. But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith. Galatians 3., 10, 11.
  • Question 38. 12. And the law is not of faith: but, The man that doeth them shall live in them. 18. For if the inheritance be of the law, it is no more of promise: but God gave it to Abraham by promise. 21. Is the law then against the promises of God? God forbid: for if there had been a law given which could have given life, verily righteousness should have been by the law. Galatians 3., 12, 18, 21.
    But the scripture hath concluded all under sin, that the promise by faith of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe. Galatians 3., 22.

  • Fifth Ten - Text 2
  • Question 8. And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel. Genesis 3., 15.
  • Question 38. And the angel of the LORD said unto Manoah, Of all that I said unto the woman let her beware. Judges 13., 13.
  • Question 41. And the God of peace shall bruise Satan under your feet shortly. The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you. Amen. Romans 16., 20.

  • Fifth Ten - Text 3
  • Question 3. For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren, Hebrews 2., 11.
  • Question 5. And again, I will put my trust in him. And again, Behold I and the children which God hath given me. Hebrews 2., 13.
    Behold, I and the children whom the LORD hath given me are for signs and for wonders in Israel from the LORD of hosts, which dwelleth in mount Zion. Isaiah 8., 18.
  • Question 11. For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings. Hebrews 2., 10.
  • Question 29. Then said he unto the dresser of his vineyard, Behold, these three years I come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and find none: cut it down; why cumbereth it the ground? Luke 13., 7.
    Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin. Romans 6., 6.
  • Question 36. 15:1 Moreover, brethren, I declare unto you the gospel which I preached unto you, which also ye have received, and wherein ye stand; 15:2 By which also ye are saved, if ye keep in memory what I preached unto you, unless ye have believed in vain. 15:3 For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; 15:4 And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures: 15:5 And that he was seen of Cephas, then of the twelve: 15:6 After that, he was seen of above five hundred brethren at once; of whom the greater part remain unto this present, but some are fallen asleep. 15:7 After that, he was seen of James; then of all the apostles. 15:8 And last of all he was seen of me also, as of one born out of due time. 15:9 For I am the least of the apostles, that am not meet to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. 15:10 But by the grace of God I am what I am: and his grace which was bestowed upon me was not in vain; but I labored more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me. 15:11 Therefore whether it were I or they, so we preach, and so ye believed. 15:12 Now if Christ be preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead? 15:13 But if there be no resurrection of the dead, then is Christ not risen: 15:14 And if Christ be not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith is also vain. 15:15 Yea, and we are found false witnesses of God; because we have testified of God that he raised up Christ: whom he raised not up, if so be that the dead rise not. 15:16 For if the dead rise not, then is not Christ raised: 418 15:17 And if Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins. 15:18 Then they also which are fallen asleep in Christ are perished. 15:19 If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable. 15:20 But now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the firstfruits of them that slept. 15:21 For since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead. 15:22 For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive. 15:23 But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ's at his coming. 15:24 Then cometh the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have put down all rule and all authority and power. 15:25 For he must reign, till he hath put all enemies under his feet. 15:26 The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death. 15:27 For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him. 15:28 And when all things shall be subdued unto him, then shall the Son also himself be subject unto him that put all things under him, that God may be all in all. 15:29 Else what shall they do which are baptized for the dead, if the dead rise not at all? why are they then baptized for the dead? 15:30 And why stand we in jeopardy every hour? 15:31 I protest by your rejoicing which I have in Christ Jesus our Lord, I die daily. 15:32 If after the manner of men I have fought with beasts at Ephesus, what advantageth it me, if the dead rise not? let us eat and drink; for to morrow we die. 15:33 Be not deceived: evil communications corrupt good manners. 419 15:34 Awake to righteousness, and sin not; for some have not the knowledge of God: I speak this to your shame. 15:35 But some man will say, How are the dead raised up? and with what body do they come? 15:36 Thou fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die: 15:37 And that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body that shall be, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat, or of some other grain: 15:38 But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body. 15:39 All flesh is not the same flesh: but there is one kind of flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, and another of birds. 15:40 There are also celestial bodies, and bodies terrestrial: but the glory of the celestial is one, and the glory of the terrestrial is another. 15:41 There is one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars: for one star differeth from another star in glory. 15:42 So also is the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption: 15:43 It is sown in dishonor; it is raised in glory: it is sown in weakness; it is raised in power: 15:44 It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. There is a natural body, and there is a spiritual body. 15:45 And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit. 15:46 Howbeit that was not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural; and afterward that which is spiritual. 15:47 The first man is of the earth, earthy; the second man is the Lord from heaven. 15:48 As is the earthy, such are they also that are earthy: and as is the heavenly, such are they also that are heavenly. 15:49 And as we have born the image of the earthy, we shall also bear the image of the heavenly. 420 15:50 Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; neither doth corruption inherit incorruption. 15:51 Behold, I shew you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, 15:52 In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed. 15:53 For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality. 15:54 So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. 15:55 O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory? 15:56 The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law. 15:57 But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. 15:58 Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye stedfast, unmoveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labor is not in vain in the Lord. 1 Corinthians 15.

  • Fifth Ten - Text 4
  • Question 2. Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, to the strangers scattered throughout Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, 1 Peter 1., 1.
  • Question 4. But as he which hath called you is holy, so be ye holy in all manner of conversation; 1 Peter 1., 15.
  • Question 5. And if ye call on the Father, who without respect of persons judgeth according to every man’s work, pass the time of your sojourning here in fear: 1 Peter 1., 17.
  • Question 6. And if ye call on the Father, who without respect of persons judgeth according to every man’s work, pass the time of your sojourning here in fear: 1 Peter 1., 17.
  • Question 7. And when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were troubled, saying, It is a spirit; and they cried out for fear. Matthew 14., 26.
    And for fear of him the keepers did shake, and became as dead men. Matthew 28., 4.
    And deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. Hebrews 2., 15.
    Then had the churches rest throughout all Judaea and Galilee and Samaria, and were edified; and walking in the fear of the Lord, and in the comfort of the Holy Ghost, were multiplied. Acts 9., 31.
    And a voice came out of the throne, saying, Praise our God, all ye his servants, and ye that fear him, both small and great. Revelation 19., 5.
  • Question 23. 12. When thou takest the sum of the children of Israel after their number, then shall they give every man a ransom for his soul unto the LORD, when thou numberest them; that there be no plague among them, when thou numberest them. 13. This they shall give, every one that passeth among them that are numbered, half a shekel after the shekel of the sanctuary: (a shekel is twenty gerahs:) an half shekel shall be the offering of the LORD. 14. Every one that passeth among them that are numbered, from twenty years old and above, shall give an offering unto the LORD. 15. The rich shall not give more, and the poor shall not give less than half a shekel, when they give an offering unto the LORD, to make an atonement for your souls. 16. And thou shalt take the atonement money of the children of Israel, and shalt appoint it for the service of the tabernacle of the congregation; that it may be a memorial unto the children of Israel before the LORD, to make an atonement for your souls. Exodus 30., 12-16.
    44. And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, 45. Take the Levites instead of all the firstborn among the children of Israel, and the cattle of the Levites instead of their cattle; and the Levites shall be mine: I am the LORD. 46. And for those that are to be redeemed of the two hundred and threescore and thirteen of the firstborn of the children of Israel, which are more than the Levites; 47. Thou shalt even take five shekels apiece by the poll, after the shekel of the sanctuary shalt thou take them: (the shekel is twenty gerahs:) Numbers 3., 44-47.
  • Question 27. For our conversation is in heaven; from whence also we look for the Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ: Philippians 3., 20.
  • Question 32. Now therefore why tempt ye God, to put a yoke upon the neck of the disciples, which neither our fathers nor we were able to bear? Acts 15., 10.
  • Question 33. 2.Why do thy disciples transgress the tradition of the elders? for they wash not their hands when they eat bread. 3. But he answered and said unto them, Why do ye also transgress the commandment of God by your tradition? 4. For God commanded, saying, Honor thy father and mother: and, He that curseth father or mother, let him die the death. 5. But ye say, Whosoever shall say to his father or his mother, It is a gift, by whatsoever thou mightest be profited by me; 6. And honor not his father or his mother, he shall be free. Thus have ye made the commandment of God of none effect by your tradition. Matthew 15., 2-6.
  • Question 34. 3. For the Pharisees, and all the Jews, except they wash their hands oft, eat not, holding the tradition of the elders. 4. And when they come from the market, except they wash, they eat not. And many other things there be, which they have received to hold, as the washing of cups, and pots, brasen vessels, and of tables. 5. Then the Pharisees and scribes asked him, Why walk not thy disciples according to the tradition of the elders, but eat bread with unwashen hands? 6. He answered and said unto them, Well hath Esaias prophesied of you hypocrites, as it is written, This people honoreth me with their lips, but their heart is far from me. 7. Howbeit in vain do they worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men. 8. For laying aside the commandment of God, ye hold the tradition of men, as the washing of pots and cups: and many other such like things ye do. 9. And he said unto them, Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition. 10. For Moses said, Honor thy father and thy mother; and, Whoso curseth father or mother, let him die the death: 11. But ye say, If a man shall say to his father or mother, It is Corban, that is to say, a gift, by whatsoever thou mightest be profited by me; he shall be free. 12. And ye suffer him no more to do ought for his father or his mother; 13. Making the word of God of none effect through your tradition, which ye have delivered: and many such like things do ye. 14. And when he had called all the people unto him, he said unto them, Hearken unto me every one of you, and understand: Mark 7., 3-14.

  • Fifth Ten - Text 5
  • Question 1. Moreover he sprinkled with blood both the tabernacle, and all the vessels of the ministry. Hebrews 9., 21.
  • Question 4. Moreover he sprinkled with blood both the tabernacle, and all the vessels of the ministry. Hebrews 9., 21.
  • Question 21. 11. But if he be not able to bring two turtledoves, or two young pigeons, then he that sinned shall bring for his offering the tenth part of an ephah of fine flour for a sin offering; he shall put no oil upon it, neither shall he put any frankincense thereon: for it is a sin offering. 12. Then shall he bring it to the priest, and the priest shall take his handful of it, even a memorial thereof, and burn it on the altar, according to the offerings made by fire unto the LORD: it is a sin offering. 13. And the priest shall make an atonement for him as touching his sin that he hath sinned in one of these, and it shall be forgiven him: and the remnant shall be the priest’s, as a meat offering. Leviticus 5., 11-13.

  • Fifth Ten - Text 6
  • Question 5. Hebrews 4., 14. Revised Version
  • Question 7. Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession. Hebrews 4., 14.

  • Fifth Ten - Text 7
  • Question 2. 14. For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us; 15. Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace; 16. And that he might reconcile both unto God in one body by the cross, having slain the enmity thereby: 17. And came and preached peace to you which were afar off, and to them that were nigh. Ephesians 2., 14-17.
  • Question 3. But now in Christ Jesus ye who sometimes were far off are made nigh by the blood of Christ. Ephesians 2., 13.
  • Question 5. Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace; Ephesians 2., 15.
  • Question 14. Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.
    John 14., 6.
  • Question 19. For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us; Ephesians 2., 14.
  • Question 21. Now therefore ye are no more strangers and foreigners, but fellowcitizens with the saints, and of the household of God; Ephesians 2., 19.

  • Fifth Ten - Text 8
  • Question 16. 5. If brethren dwell together, and one of them die, and have no child, the wife of the dead shall not marry without unto a stranger: her husband’s brother shall go in unto her, and take her to him to wife, and perform the duty of an husband’s brother unto her. 6. And it shall be, that the firstborn which she beareth shall succeed in the name of his brother which is dead, that his name be not put out of Israel. Deuteronomy 25., 5, 6.

  • Fifth Ten - Text 9
  • Question 14. For the mountains shall depart, and the hills be removed; but my kindness shall not depart from thee, neither shall the covenant of my peace be removed, saith the LORD that hath mercy on thee. Isaiah 54., 10.
    In righteousness shalt thou be established: thou shalt be far from oppression; for thou shalt not fear: and from terror; for it shall not come near thee. Isaiah 54., 14.
    And all thy children shall be taught of the LORD; and great shall be the peace of thy children. Isaiah 54., 13.
    No weapon that is formed against thee shall prosper; and every tongue that shall rise against thee in judgment thou shalt condemn. This is the heritage of the servants of the LORD, and their righteousness is of me, saith the LORD. Isaiah 54., 17.

  • Fifth Ten - Text 10
  • Question 6. And every priest standeth daily ministering and offering oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins: Hebrews 10., 11.
    But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God; Hebrews 10., 12.
  • Question 10. By the which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.
    Hebrews 10., 10.
    For then must he often have suffered since the foundation of the world: but now once in the end of the world hath he appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. Hebrews 9., 26.
  • Question 30. 16. This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them; 17. And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more. 18. Now where remission of these is, there is no more offering for sin. Hebrews 10., 16-18.

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