The One Hundred Texts - Text Set 7 - 2017 Version.
Swanny's
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The One Hundred Texts

Bible studies for an understanding of Reformation Christianity
Text Set 7 -
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The Text Study Index.
Text Set 1 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 2 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 3 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 4 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 5 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 6 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 7 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 8 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 9 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 10 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


THE ONE HUNDRED TEXTS OF THE SOCIETY FOR IRISH CHURCH MISSIONS.

THE SEVENTH TEN

1 CORINTHIANS 2., 14.

But the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him; neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned.




Now the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him; and he cannot know them, because they are spiritually judged. - R.V.

But the natural man does not receive the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; nor can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned. - N.K.J.V.

The natural person does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are folly to him, and he is not able to understand them because they are spiritually discerned. - E.S.V.

THE SEVENTH TEN - TEXT 1.

I. - The Natural Man.
  1. Of what has the apostle Paul been speaking?
    The fact that his teaching whs given by the Spirit of God.
  2. What did he say about the manner of receiving Spiritual things?
    That Spiritual things could only be compared or joined together by Spiritual things.
  3. What illustration does he give?
    No man knoweth the things of a man save the spirit of man in him.
  4. What is meant by this illustration?
    We understand other people because we have the same kind of mind as they.
  5. What claim does he make for his teaching?
    That having received the Spirit of God he teaches according to the Spirit.
  6. What does he say is the nature of this teaching?
    That Spiritual things are combined or compared with Spiritual.
  7. What sad result follows from this fact?
    Our text,
    1 Corinthians 2,, 14.
  8. What is the Greek word for " natural man " Greek - Soulish or animal.
  9. How else is the word " natural " translated?
    As " sensual,"
    James 3., 15; Jude 19.
  10. What is the R.V. margin in each case?
    " Or natural" (
    James 3., 15.); or "animal" {Jude 19).
  11. What does St. Paul mean by " the natural man": The man who has only the life that comes from Adam.
  12. Where is this taught clearly?
    1 Corinthians 15., 44, 45.
  13. What are we to understand by the expression " the natural man" ?
    Man as he is now by virtue of the nature he receives from his parents. parents. .
  14. What other word does St. Paul use that has a similar meaning?
    Carnal,
    Romans 7., 14; 1 Corinthians 3., 1. 3.
II. - His Attitude Towards the Things of God.
  1. What are we told about " the natural man " ?
    Our text,
    1 Corinthians 2., 14.
  2. What is meant by " receiveth " ?
    Accepts with favour.
  3. What are " the things of the Spirit of God " ?
    Those things which have been revealed by the Spirit.
    1 Corinthians 2., l0.
  4. How do such things appear to the natural man?
    As foolishness.
  5. What lesson does this teach us?
    Blindness to the truth of Scripture is an evidence of our fallen state.
  6. What truth of God does Paul tell us appeared as foolishness to the Greeks?
    Salvation by the death of our Lord Jesus Christ {
    1 Corinthians 1., 23).
  7. What name does Paul give this truth in view of the objections made to it?
    "The offence of the Cross."
    Galatians 5., 11.
III. - Due to Inability.
  1. What doctrines then may we expect the natural man will refuse?
    The doctrine of his needy state and of our Lord's sacrifice for sin.
  2. What does Paul add to "receiveth not ..... foolishness unto him " ?
    " Neither can he know them,"
  3. How has Paul previously described " knowing" ?
    As one spirit recognising or understanding another spirit.
  4. How does he show that he has the same idea here?
    By adding " because they are spiritually discerned."
  5. What is the meaning of " discerned " ?
    Estimated or given their true place and value.
  6. What is meant by " he cannot know them " (R.V.)?
    He is not able to know them. He lacks the power of receiving that which is presented.
  7. What is necessary in order to know these things?
    To have the Spirit of God.
  8. What text have we had that teaches this need?
    John 3., 3. (page 99, Third Ten - Text 2.)
  9. What is the great loss in ordinary men?
    They have not the Spirit.
    Jude 19.
  10. What does this teach us about sin?
    That it makes us indifferent and hostile to God's messages.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does this text tell us as to our state by nature?
    That we are by nature opposed to the things of God.
  2. Why are we opposed to the things of God?
    Because the soul of man is separated from God on account of sin.
  3. What does it teach as about human effort while in this state?
    That it is unable to know and therefore to act according to the will of God.
  4. What does the Church of Rome teach about the soul of man and the things of God?
    That it can predispose itself towards good.
  5. What does our Article X. teach?
    That man " cannot turn and prepare himself, by his own natural strength and good works, to faith and calling upon God."
  6. How does this text support our Article?
    By the strong words "he it not able to know." (Greek literally translated.)
  7. What does the text teach conccrning human merit?
    It cannot exiist because " The natural," etc
  8. If human merit does not exist to what do we owe the fact that we may know the things of God?
    To the work of God the Holy Ghost in our hearts,
  9. What lesson is taught us?
    Salvation begins and ends with God, our knowledge of it is the work of the Spirit in our hearts.


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GOSPEL of MATTHEW 9., 12, 13.

But when Jesus heard that, he said unto them, They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick. But go ye and learn what that meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacriflce: for I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.




But when he heard it, he said, They that are whole have no need of a physician, but they that are sick. But go ye and learn what this meaneth, I desire mercy, and not sacrifice: for I came not to call the righteous, but sinners. - R.V.

When Jesus heard that, He said to them, "Those who are well have no need of a physician,
but those who are sick. But go and learn what this means: 'I desire mercy and not sacrifice.' For I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners, to repentance." - N.K.J.V.

But when he heard it, he said, "Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. Go and learn what this means, 'I desire mercy, and not sacrifice.' For I came not to call the righteous, but sinners." - E.S.V.

THE SEVENTH TEN - TEXT 2.

I. - An Objection Stated, .
  1. To whom were these avoids spoken?
    To the Pharisees.
  2. What had our Lord heard?
    Their question given in
    Matthew 9., 11.
  3. To whom was this question addressed?
    To the disciples,
  4. What led the publicans and sinners to sit down?
    They were invited by Matthew. See
    Luke 5., 29.
  5. Why had Matthew invited them?
    Because he had just been called to follow Jesus.
  6. What lesson do we learn from this?
    That those who know the Lord should strive to lead others to know Him.
  7. What were the objections of the Pharisees?
    That our Lord degraded Himself by mixing with sinners
  8. What is meant by the word " sinners " here?
    Those who were openly known as living evil lives.
  9. Who were the publicans?
    Roman tax-gatherers who were frequently unjust (page 115, Third Ten - Text 5)
  10. How far were the Pharisees right?
    That it is our duty to avoid evil company.
  11. What mistake did they make?
    They thought that the effort to save was itself a contamination.
II. - The Answer in Parable.
  1. How did our Lord show the mistake?
    By the illustration of the physician.
  2. What is the Greek word for " the whole" . The strong {Greek)
  3. What does Our Lord teach by the illustration of the Physician?
    Thai His proper place was with the sinners as He was their Healer.
  4. What does this teach us about the Gospel?
    That it is a message for the sin-diseased and suffering.
  5. What rebuke is addressed to the Pharisees?
    You are keeping hesling from those who need it most,
  6. What doea this teach us concerning our duty?
    That we must seek out those who are most m need and bring the Gospel to tbem.
  7. What is meant by saying " They that be whole need not physician "?
    The realty well do not want care; therefore those who think they are well will not seek a physician.
  8. What does this teach us concerning those who really look to Christ?
    They must first have a sense of their need.
  9. What is this sense of need called?
    Conviction of sin.
III - The Answer of God,
  1. What command did our Lord give the Pharisees?
    "Go ye." etc.
  2. What charge does He lay upon them by this command?
    That they were ignorant of the Scriptures which they professed to follow.
  3. From what Old Testament prophet are these words quoted?
    The Prophet Hosea (
    Hosea 6., 6).
  4. What is meant by the contrast between mercy and sacrifice?
    That God regards the inward motive, rather than the outward observance.
  5. What was the peculiar sin of the Pharisees?
    That they had a religion of ceremony and no spiritual life.
  6. What is meant by saying God desired not sacrifice?
    That God is nor appeased by a worship of the lips when the heart is far from Him.
  7. Against what evil does this saying warn us?
    Against turning religion into superstition.
  8. How did the Pharisees show that they were superstitious?
    They despised the sinners who came to our Lord, simply because they had not learned the intricate ritual of an elaborate worship.
IV. - The Mission of Christ.
  1. How did our Lord state His mission?
    " I am not come," etc
  2. What change does R.V. make in this text?
    It leaves out the words "to repentance."
  3. What is meant by saying the Lord came?
    That He left heaven on His Mission of mercy.
  4. What is meant by the Lord calling sinners?
    Speaking wiih power to their souls.
  5. What is meant by " I am not come to call the righteous"?
    My mission is to a fallen world. It is only ihe sinful who need o Saviour.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What was the peculiar idea of the Pharisees?
    That they were superior to ordinary people because they knew the law or God.
  2. How does our Lord rebuke this idea?
    By teaching that it is man's sin that claims His regard, not his merits.
  3. How did the Pharisee hope to obtain favour?
    By a round of religious observances.
  4. What does the Roman Catholic Church teach about Indulgences?
    That by certain observances the faithful an secure remission of the temporal punishment
    due to sin in whole or part.
  5. To what evil does this lead?
    An undue regard to mere observances; eg. visiting chapels, pilgrimages, etc.
  6. How does it minister to self-righteousness?
    By encouraging men to believe ihat they have procured favour from God by their efforts.
  7. How does our text condemn it?
    By its rebuke of the same idea in the case of the Pharisees.


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ROMANS 1. 16,17.

For I am not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek. For therein is the righteousness of God revealed from faith to faith: as it is written, The just shall live by faith.




For I am not ashamed of the gospel: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek. For therein is revealed a righteousness of God by faith unto faith:
as it is written, But the righteous shall live by faith. - R.V.

For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ, for it is the power of God to salvation for everyone who believes, for the Jew first and also for the Greek. 17 For in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith to faith;
as it is written, "The just shall live by faith." - N.K.J.V.

For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. For in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith for faith,
as it is written, "The righteous shall live by faith." - E.S.V.

THE SEVENTH TEN - TEXT 3.

I. - A Worthy Gospel.
  1. Who spoke these words?
    The apostle Paul.
  2. What led him to utter them?
    The thought of going to Rome.
  3. What had he said he was ready to do at Rome?
    " To preach the Gospel."
  4. What is meant by ihe word " Gospel "?
    Good news.
  5. What does he here say about the Gospel?
    He is not ashamed of it.
  6. Why should he think shame of giving "good news"?
    Because many did not so regard his message, but as foolishness.
  7. Why would he be most likely to feel shame in preaching at Rome?
    Because it was the very centre of heathen power.
  8. What lesson can we learn from this?
    That often "good news" is rejected and we should think of our message, not of its reception.
  9. What is the difference here between the Revised and Authorised Versions?
    The R.V. omits the words " of Christ."
  10. What do the words " the Gospel" alone teach?
    That there is really only one thing that can be spoken of as " good news."
II. - A Powerful Gospel.
  1. What reason does Paul give for not being ashamed?
    That "it is ihe power or God."
  2. What is meant by saying the Gospel is the power of God?
    That weak as it seems God's power goes forth in it and by it.
  3. Unto what is the Gospel God's power?
    " Unto salvation."
  4. What is meant by " salvation " ?
    Putting away the punishment due to sin and bringing into eternal life.
  5. How many aspects has salvation?
    Three: Past, present and future.
  6. To whom is the Gospel the power of God?
    " To everyone that believeth."
  7. What is meant by " believeth "?
    Keeps on trusting in our Lord Jesus Christ.
III. - A Gospel for All,
  1. How does St Paul expand the word " Everyone "?
    To Jew and Greek.
  2. What is the meaning of the words "To the Jew first, and also to the Greek " ?
    To the former holders of God's revelation and all others.
  3. What other division had Paul just mentioned?
    Greek and Barbarian.
  4. What should we say instead of Greek end Barbarian?
    Learned and unlearned.
  5. Taking the terms, Jew, Greek, Barbarian, what do we learn about the Gospel?
    That no class is excluded from Ihe benefit of the Gospel and no distinctions should be made between men in preaching it.
IV. - Revealing Righteousness
  1. What reason does Paul give for regarding the Gospel as "the power of God "?
    Because it reveals God's righteousness.
  2. What is meant by righteousness?
    Perfect obedience to the law of God in thought, word and deed without omission.
  3. What is meant by saying a righteousness is revealed?
    That before it was hidden but now is exposed to view.
  4. What is meant by " the righteousness of God "?
    The righteousness provided by God which satisfies God.
  5. How does this righteousness come?
    " From faith to faith."
  6. What is meant by "from faith to faith"?
    That this righteousness is revealed as coming from faith and is received by faith.
  7. What then is meant by righteousness from faith?
    That where this righteousness is found it springs from faith.
  8. What then is meant by "to faith"?
    That where this righteousness is desired it is appropriated by faith.
  9. What Old Testament passage did he quote?
    " The just shall live by faith."
  10. From what Prophet is it quoted?
    Habakkuk (
    Habakkuk 2., 4).
  11. How often is it quoted in the New Testament?
    Three times - Here,
    Galatians 3., 11. and Hebrews 10., 38.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What is the teaching of our text?
    The power of God to salvation is given to everyone that believeth,
  2. How then is salvation obtained?
    By failh.
  3. Why is salvation obtained by faith?
    Because it is out of faith God's righteousness is revealed.
  4. How is this expressed in our Article?
    See Article XI.
  5. What is this doctrine called?
    Justification by failh.
  6. Whar does the Church of Rome teach?
    Justification is obtained by sacraments and increased by good works.
  7. How does our text contradict this?
    The Gospel is a Gospel of faith only.


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GOSPEL of JOHN 10., 27, 28.

My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me: And I give unto them eternal life;
and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand.




My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me: and I give unto them eternal life;
and they shall never perish, and no one shall snatch them out of my hand. - R.V.

My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me. And I give them eternal life,
and they shall never perish; neither shall anyone snatch them out of My hand. - N.K.J.V.

My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life,
and they will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand. - E.S.V.

THE SEVENTH TEN - TEXT 4.

I. - The Character of Christ's Sheep.
  1. About whom is our Lord speaking in this text?
    About His sheep,
  2. Why does He use the expression "My Sheep"?
    To distinguish the class He spoke about from others.
  3. From whom does He distinguish His sheep?
    From the unbelieving Jews.
  4. How do we know this?
    John 10,. 26.
  5. To what parable does our text refer?
    To the parable of the Good Shepherd.
  6. Where were the words of our text spoken?
    In Solomon's porch.
  7. What gave rise to the words of our Text?
    The question of the Jews,
    John 10,. 24.
  8. How does our Lord describe His Sheep?
    John 10,. 27.
  9. What is meant by "hear My voice"?
    Recognize it and attend to it as do the sheep to their own shepherd.
  10. What is meant by "I know them"?
    I have an intimate knowledge and a special regard for them,
    John 10,. 3, 4.
  11. What is meant by "they follow Me"?
    They take the way marked out by the Shepherd.
    John 10,. 4.
  12. What do these illustrations mean in the spiritual life?
    That those who follow the Lord have been awakened, trusted in Him and daily follow Him.
II. - The Gift to Christ's Sheep.
  1. What does our Lord say He gives His sheep?
    " Eternal Life."
  2. What is meant by " Eternal Life"?
    Everlasting life in the presence of God enjoying everything that makes life worth having.
  3. When does "Eternal Life" begin?
    When we hear the voice of Jesus. (Note, "I give" not "I will give "}.
  4. What lesson can we learn from the words " I give unto them eternal life"?
    That eternal life is bestowed upon us and not earned.
III. - The Security of Christ's Sheep.
  1. What else does He say concerning His sheep?
    " Neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand,"
  2. What is the meaning of the words "any man"?
    They mean anyone at all, either man or devil.
  3. What is meant by the word " pluck"?
    Snatch away like a wolf does the sheep. Compare
    John 10,. 12.
IV. - The Protection of Christ's Sheep.
  1. Where does our Lord place His sheep?
    In His hand.
  2. What is meant by saying His sheep are in His hand?
    The Lord holds them against all enemies.
  3. How does our Lord strengthen the thought that He gives eternal life?
    Ey adding " they shall never perish."
  4. What is the meaning of the word " perish"?
    To be destroyed, to bring to nothing, to be lost. Compare
    Matthew 10., 6.
  5. What is the meaning of "they shall never perish"?
    They shall never die to all eternity. (Note. Not "They die but not forever," but " never shall they die,"}
  6. What truth do the statements, "They shall never perish" and " Neither shall uny man pluck them out of my hand " taken together teach us?
    That nothing internal or external can injure the Lord's sheep,
  7. What does the use of the word " perish " as the opposite to " eternal life" teach us?
    That no one really lives except those who have eternal life.
  8. What is the great lesson of this text?
    It teaches the security of believers.
  9. Upon what does the security of believers depend?
    Upon the gifts and power of our Lord Jesus Girist.
  10. What confidence does this fact give us?
    It teaches us that our Salvation is in the hands of God and not simply dependent on our own efforts.
  11. What name is sometimes given to the doctrine of the security of believers?
    The doctrine of Final Perseverance.
  12. Which of our Articles teaches ihe doctrine of Final Perseverance?
    Article XVII.
  13. What class of people are entitled to draw comfort from the doctrine of Final Perseverance?
    Those who hear and follow our Lord Jesus Christ.
  14. Why is it necessary to be sure that we hear and follow our Lord Jesus Christ before we draw comfort from the doctrine of Final Perseverance?
    Because that is the evidence He Himself lays down to prove that we are His sheep.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What are the marks of the true sheep according to our text?
    They hear and follow the Lord Jesus Chtist.
  2. What additional mark does the Church of Rome require?
    That they should hear and follow the Pope.
  3. What would the Church of Rome have to prove before she could make the fact a mark of the true sheep?
    That our Lord had appointed the Pope to lead His sheep in His place.
  4. Why do we deny that our Lord appointed the Pope to lead in His place?
    Because our Lord never mentions it, nor do His Apostles.
  5. What does the text "Thou art Peter" mean?
    That our Lord builds His Church by means of the testimony of those who know Him to be the Christ, and that to Peter was given the privilege of opening the testimony on the Day of Pentecost. See Notes on
    2 Peter 1, 21, (page 176, Fourth Ten - Text 7) and Notes on 1 Corinthians iii., 11, (page 189, Fourth Ten - Text 10).
  6. What protection have the true sheep against false shepherds?
    They hear the voice of the Good Shepherd and distinguish it from the voice of strangers.
  7. What then is the safest way of judging all claims like the claim of the Pope?
    To bring them to the test by comparing their teaching with that of our Lord Jesus Christ.


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EZEKIEL 36., 26, 27.

A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you an heart of flesh. And I will put my spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes, and ye shall keep my judgments, and do them.




A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you: and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you an heart of flesh. And I will put my spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes, and ye shall keep my judgments, and do them. - R.V.

I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit within you; I will take the heart of stone out of your flesh
and give you a heart of flesh. I will put My Spirit within you and cause you to walk in My
statutes, and you will keep My judgments and do them. - N.K.J.V.

And I will give you a new heart, and a new spirit I will put within you. And I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my Spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes and be careful to obey my rules. - E.S.V.

THE SEVENTH TEN - TEXT 5.

I. - A Necessary Renewal.
  1. To whom were these words spoken?
    To the children of Israel.
  2. By whom were they spoken?
    Ezekiel.
  3. In what place were Ezekiel and the children of Israel?
    Captives (in Assyria) by the river of Chebar. (
    Ezekiel 1., 1.)
  4. What message did Ezekiel bring to the children of Israel?
    The Message of Restoration from Captivity.
  5. How long after the prophecy was it fulfilled?
    About 70 years.
  6. How are the people of Israel described?
    As profaning God's Name amongst the heathen.
  7. What reason does God give for bringing them out of Captivity?
    That he would sanctify His Great Name amongst the heathen.
  8. How did God propose to sanctify His great Name?
    By bringing them into their own land and cleansing them {
    Ezekiel 36., 24, 25).
  9. From what were they to be cleansed?
    Filthiness and idols.
  10. What guarantee was there to be against future sin?
    A new heart and a new spirit.
  11. What does the Bible mean by the heart?
    The seat of intelligence, affcction and will.
  12. What does this message of the change of heart teach us?
    That evil is internal; we must be changed ourselves.
  13. What would the possession of a new heart mean?
    That the whole inner nature was changed.
  14. How is the new heart obtained?
    God gives it.
  15. What does the fact that it is given teach?
    That we are dependent on the power of God, and not on our own efforts, for this change.
  16. How is ihe fact of the change emphasised ?
    God adds "and a new spirit," etc.
  17. What is meant by the word "spirit"?
    The inner principle which directs our activities,
  18. What then is meant by "a new spirit"?
    A different controlling temperament.
II. - A Necessary Removal.
  1. How does God describe the old heart?
    As a stony heart.
  2. What is meant by a stony heart?
    A heart that is cold, hard and dead.
  3. How is the new heart described?
    As "an heart of flesh."
  4. What is meant by " an heart of flesh "?
    A heart that feels impressions.
  5. What does God say He will do with the stony heart?
    He will take it away,
  6. What would be the sign of its removal?
    A sense of our sinfulness and God's love.
III. - A True Revival.
  1. How does God further describe the "new spirit" ?
    As His Spirit
  2. What do we learn from the fact that it is God's Spirit that is put within us?
    That our new nature would be God-like.
  3. What encouragement is there in the words " I will put My Spirit," etc.?
    That God's power avails for us.
  4. Why was it necessary for Ezekiel to lay special stress on that message?
    Because the people of Israel despaired of deliverance.
IV. - A Blessed Result.
  1. What is the effect of the Spirit of God upon us?
    We walk in His statutes and keep His judgments.
  2. What is meant by walking in His statutes?
    Following carefully God's guidance as revealed in His particular commands in Scripture. To the Jews - keeping the law as God revealed it.
  3. What is meant by keeping His judgments?
    Guiding our whole life by the rules that God has given us.
  4. What practical lesson about the Spirit does this teach us?
    That His work in the heart is manifested by a life in accordance with the Will of God.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does this text teach us as to the source of good works?
    They spring from the new heart and the presence of God's Spirit.
  2. What does it teach us about the necessity of good works?
    They must result from the new heart and the presence of God's Spirit.
  3. What does it tell us about the cause of good works?
    They are due to the operation of God's Spirit within us.
  4. To what then are we to assign our power to please God?
    To His grace working in us " to will and to do. of His good pleasure." (
    Philippians 2., 13.)
  5. What does the Roman Catholic Church teach about good works?
    That they dispose God to be favourable and increase His favour where it has been obtained.
  6. How does God correct that idea in this message to the Israelites?
    He says quite plainly that He gives the grace of righteousness not their sake (compare
    Ezekiel 36., 32).
  7. What mistake does the Church of Rome make about good works?
    She attaches merit to them.
  8. What do we teach about good works?
    That they are necessary, but result from God's work in our soul and are rewarded simply because He loves us, not because we deserve it.


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GALATIANS 5., 22, 23, 24.

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith.
Meekness, temperance: against such there is no law, And they that are Christ's have crucified
the flesh with the affections and lusts.




But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness,
meekness, temperance: against such there is no law. And they that are of Christ Jesus have crucified
the flesh with the passions and the lusts thereof. - R.V.

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness,
gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law. And those who are Christ's have crucified
the flesh with its passions and desires. - N.K.J.V.

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness,
gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law. And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified
the flesh with its passions and desires. - E.S.V.

THE SEVENTH TEN - TEXT 6.

I. - The Spirit and its Fruit,
  1. Who wrote these words?
    The apostle Paul,
  2. What had he been speaking about?
    The conflict between flesh and Spirit.
  3. How do we gain victory over the flesh?
    By walking in, or by, the Spirit.
  4. With what does Paul contrast the fruit of the Spirit?
    With the works of Ihe flesh.
  5. Why does He speak of the fruit of the Spirit?
    To teach us that the Spirit forms the character from inside, like a tree shapes its own fruit.
  6. What is the difference between fruit and works?
    Works are various activities, all of which need not be present.
    Fruit is the gathering of the whole character into a unity.
  7. What is fhr first thing mentioned as the fruit of the Spirit?
    Love.
  8. Why is it mentioned first?
    Because we had been told before that the whole law was fulfilled in it
  9. What is meant by love?
    Kindly spirit, a right relation both to God end man.
  10. What is meant by joy?
    Gladness of heart.
  11. Why should the Christian be glad?
    Because God has freed us in Christ,
  12. What is meant by peace?
    Rest of soul.
  13. What is meant by longsuffering?
    Patience under trying conditions. Bearing with the fault of others.
  14. What is meant by gentleness?
    Kindly treatment of others.
  15. What is meant by goodness?
    An internal zeal for righteousness and truth.
  16. What is meant by faith?
    Trustworthiness, or trustfulness,
  17. What is meant by meekness?
    Submission to God's Will,
  18. What is meant by temperance?
    Self-control, or self mastery.
II. - The Fruit and the Law,
  1. What does Paul say concerning this fruit of the Spirit?
    " Against such there is no law."
  2. What does he mean by saying " There is no law " ?
    There is no commandment of God which we break.
  3. How had he just expressed the same thought?
    By writing that the whole law is fulfilled (compare
    Galatians 5,. 14).
  4. What does he say is the result of practising the works of the flesh?
    Galatians 5,. 21.
  5. What great lesson do these words teach us?
    That we are freed from the penalty of law in Christ, in order that we may be conformed to the law in our lives.
  6. What is it that hinders our conformity to God's Law?
    The flesh lusting against the spirit.
  7. How do we obtain freedom from the flesh?
    By walking in the Spirit.
III, - The Christian and the Flesh.
  1. How does Paul describe true Christians?
    Galatians 5,. 24.
  2. What is R.V. for " They that are," etc.?
    " They that are of Christ Jesus."
  3. What does he say they have done?
    Galatians 5,. 24.
  4. What is meant by the word "flesh" ?
    Corrupt human nature.
  5. Why is our evil nature spoken of as " Flesh " ?
    Because it is the perishing part of our being and suggests weakness and sin.
  6. What have Christians done with the flesh?
    They have crucified it.
  7. What idea is given us here by this word " crucifixion "?
    That we condemn and seek to destroy our evil nature,
  8. What are the two manifestations of the flesh?
    Affections and lusts.
  9. What is meant by " affections " ?
    Strong tendencies towards evil.
  10. What is meant by "lusts"?
    The seeking of satisfaction, desires.
IV. - Error Condemned,
  1. What does this text teach us about righteousness?
    That it is the fruit of the Spirit.
  2. What is the popular Romish expression for " fitness for heaven " ?
    " Making one's soul."
  3. How are people encouraged to make their soul?
    By performing various religious observances,
  4. How far does ihe Roman Catholic Church recognise the truth of our text?
    By demanding due dispositions.
  5. What mistake do Roman Catholics often make?
    They try to work up the due dispositions, instead of submitting to the Control of the Spirit,


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DEUTERONOMY 4., 2

Ye shall not add unto the word which I command you, neither shall ye diminish ought from it, that ye way keep the commandments of the LORD your God which I command you.




Ye shall not add unto the word which I command you, neither shall ye diminish from it, that ye may keep the commandments of the LORD your God which I command you. - R.V.

You shall not add to the word which I command you, nor take from it, that you may keep
the commandments of the Lord your God which I command you. - N.K.J.V.

You shall not add to the word that I command you, nor take from it, that you may keep
the commandments of the LORD your God that I command you. - E.S.V.

THE SEVENTH TEN - TEXT 7.

I. - A Divine Command Against Two Evils.
(a) adding, (b) diminishing.
  1. From what Book is our Text taken?
    Deuteronomy,
  2. What is the meaning of " Deuteronomy " ?
    The giving over again of the law,
  3. What does this giving over again teach us?
    The importance attached to the law of Cod.
  4. Why are these commands so important?
    Because they have been given us by God,
  5. What other name is given to the Commandments in our text?
    "The Word."
  6. What does the use of the expression " the Word" teach us?
    That God reveals Himself in human speech,
  7. What does it teach us about the authority belonging to these commands?
    The authority depends on the fact that the command is God's utterance.
  8. Why then were the commandments written?
    To preserve God's utterances in a true form.
  9. Through whom were the commands of God given?
    Through Moses.
  10. Where did Moses receive the Commandments?
    On the Mount Sinai, in the presence of God.
  11. [A. - adding]
    What is the first thing that our text prohibits?
    Adding to the word commanded.
  12. Was anything ever added to these words?
    The writings of the Prophets, the Psalms, etc., the New Testament.
  13. How do you reconcile with the command the fact that all these were added?
    By stating that it is human additions that are condemned,
  14. How did the Jews look upon the rest of the Old Testament?
    As God's expansion of the Law (Torah).
  15. What are we to understand by "adding" to God's Word?
    Bringing in heathen superstitions, or forms of worship different from those commanded.
  16. Have we any example in the Old Testament of adding to God's Word?
    Manasseh so acted.
    2 Chronicles 33., 3.
  17. [B. - diminishing]
    What is the second thing forbidden in the text?
    Diminishing from Gods Word.
  18. What is meant by diminishing from the Word of God?
    Neglecting some duty, or leaving out some observance therein commanded.
II. - With a Definite Object.
  1. What is the object of keeping God's Word without addition or subtraction ?
    That the people may fulfil all God's Commandments as He commanded them.
  2. How would adding prevent this?
    It would put human commands on a level with God's and make confusion, and it would give wrong ideas a false authority.
  3. How would diminishing prevent this?
    It would conceal from the people important requirements of God.
  4. What does the last part of the text teach us as to our duty?
    That we are bound to carry out all that God requires of us,
  5. What temptation does our text guard us against?
    The temptation of taking part of God's Will for the whole.
  6. What do the words " I command you " teach us?
    That we are bound to listen to those who speak to us the true Will of God.
III. - A Claim to Revelation.
  1. What does the fact that Mose commanded with God's authority tell us?
    That God has really spoken through men.
  2. What is the greatest proof that God has spoken through men?
    The message of our Lord Jesus Christ who was both God and man.
IV. - Error Condemned,
  1. How does the Church of Rome add to God's Word?
    She includes the Apocrypha, puts tradition on the same level as Scripture and makes the Church's interpretation part of the Rule of Faith.
  2. What is meant by the "Apocrypha" ?
    Books written by the Jews between the times of Old Testament and New Testament.
  3. Why do we reject the Apocrypha from the Canonical Scriptures?
    Because these books are not contained in the Bible of the Jews from whom we received the Old Testament
  4. When was the Apocrypha first included as part of Scripture?
    At the Council of Trent in the year 1547.
  5. What does the Church of Rome mean by "tradition"?
    Teaching given by the Apostles by word of mouth, afterwards written down by the Fathers, also Decrees of Councils, held at various times.
  6. What is our objection to the claim that there is teaching of the Apostles afterwards written down?
    There is no reliable evidence of any such teaching.
  7. What is our objection to including Decrees of Councils?
    They are the words of men, and not of God, and Councils have more than once contradicted one another. (See Article XXI.)
  8. Why do we object to including the Church's interpretation?
    Because if it is correct, then it is already in Holy Scripture, but the Church of Rome compels us to accept it as correct without enquiry.
  9. How does rhe Church of Rome take from the Word of God?
    She omits in her catechism the Commandment against worshipping graven images.
  10. When does the Church of Rome insert this commandment?
    When she is writing catechisms for use where the great body of the people are Protestant.
  11. Can you give any other example of taking from the Word of God?
    Dr. Doyle quotes "I fell down to worship the angel," from
    Revelation 22., 8, 9, and omits (he following words,
    "See thou do it not," (see note.)
  12. Who is recorded in the New Testament to have taken from God's Word?
    Satan at the Temptation,
    Matthew 4., 6.
  13. What words did he omit?
    "To keep thee in all thy ways" (
    Psalm 91., 11).
  14. What does our text teach us concerning God's Word?
    That we should insist upon having the whole of it, and pray God to help us to keep it.


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DEUTERONOMY 6., 6, 7.

And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart; And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.




And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be upon thine heart: and thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way,
and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up. - R.V.

"And these words which I command you today shall be in your heart. You shall teach them diligently
to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, when you walk by the way,
when you lie down, and when you rise up. - N.K.J.V.

And these words that I command you today shall be on your heart. You shall teach them diligently
to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way,
and when you
lie down, and when you rise. - E.S.V.

THE SEVENTH TEN - TEXT 8.

I. - The Sacred Words.
  1. What words immediately preceded our text?
    Deuteronomy 6., 4, 5.
  2. How are we to regard these preceding words?
    As a summary of the whole law of God.
  3. What is the beginning of all true religion?
    Belief in the Unity of God.
  4. How is ihe Unity of God expressed?
    Deuteronomy 6., 4 (R.V.)
  5. What follows from the Unity of God?
    God's revelation of Himself,
  6. Why are these "Words" of God regarded as so important?
    Because they come from God Himself, and were not mere human imaginations.
  7. What fact shows that this revelation really came from God?
    The people of Israel were the only people who attained to it.
  8. What is the word for "Lord"?
    Jehovah.
  9. How many times does this word occur in the Old Testament?
    About 5,500 times,
  10. What does the word "Jehovah" mean?
    God as a Person who is Father, Friend, and Judge (
    Exodus 34., 6, 7).
  11. How does all this bear upon the sacredness of the Words?
    When the Lord goes out of Himself to reveal Himself to man, He does so by means of words,
  12. To what is our attention directed by the command to keep God's words in our heart?
    That we should attend to the things, or matters, concerning which God speaks to us.
II. - Their Proper Place.
  1. Where does Moses say that the words should be?
    In the heart.
  2. What is meant by the heart?
    The whole inner being of man,
  3. What is meant then by having these words in our heart?
    So using them as to make them the rule of our daily conduct,
  4. How may we gather that great importance is attached to having "the Words" in our heart?
    The command is repeated directly in
    Deuteronomy 11., 18, and several places and times in other forms.
III. - The Duty of Teaching.
  1. What command is given?
    Deuteronomy 4., 7.
  2. What does the word used for "teach diligently" mean?
    To sharpen, or whet, which means so to repeal and to emphasise that all God's truth
    will be made clear to their minds.
  3. What does the command to teach to children show us?
    That we cannot begin too young to learn Gods word.
  4. What New Testament example have we of this teaching?
    The case of Timothy. See
    2 Timothy 3., 15 (page 75, Second Ten -Text 7).
  5. What fact does the teaching to the children reveal?
    That God's "Words" were in the homes of the Jewish people.
  6. What indirect blessing did this command bring?
    The Hebrew people had higher education, and knew how to read.
  7. What example have we of the same fact in more modern times?
    The Reformation laid stress on Bible teaching, and raised the standard of education.
IV. - The Duty of Meditation.
  1. What else were the people to do?
    Conclusion of
    Deuteronomy 6., 7.
  2. What is the meaning of mentioning all these various times?
    To show that at no time can we afford to forget God's Words.
  3. What is the advantage of talking about God's Words?
    It fixes the Words in our minds, an keeps our thought on heavenly things.
  4. Why does He say "in the house" and "by the way"?
    To show that we need to use God's Words in every place.
  5. Why does he say "When thou liest down, ami when thou risest up " ?
    To show that we need to use the Words of God at all times,
  6. What practice helps us to fulfil this last command?
    The practice of morning and evening prayer,
  7. Why are we commanded first to have them in our hearts, and then to teach and talk of them?
    To show that before we can use God's Words for others, we must receive them ourselves.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. Where are God's Words to be found?
    In the Bible.
  2. What does this text teach us about the use of the Bible?
    That everyone should have it and study it.
  3. How does it correct the idea that only learned people should have the Bible?
    By commanding it to be taught to children.
  4. How do we know that these texts refer to all God's law, and not only to the summary?
    They are repeated in
    Deuteronomy chapter 11. with reference to all God's Commands.
  5. What does the Church of Rome teach with regard to the Bible?
    That it can only be read where a licence has been obtained.
  6. Why does the Church of Rome make the regulation?
    Because she says "that more evil than good would arise if it were allowed to everyone"
    (De Libris Prohib., Reg. 4).
  7. How does our text condemn this view?
    By commanding everybody, even children, to learn the Words of God.
  8. What evil result followed from the Church of Rome's attitude to Scripture?
    The people were ignorant of God's Word and fell into all kinds of error and sin.
  9. What Council prohibited the circulation of Scriptures in the vulgar tongue?
    Council of Toulouse, 1229.
  10. Who are the proper people to teach God's Word?
    The parents to their children.


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ISAIAH 42., 8.

I am the LORD: that is my name: and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven image.




I am the LORD; that is my name: and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise unto graven images. - R.V.

I am the Lord, that is My name; And My glory I will not give to another, Nor My praise to carved images. - N.K.J.V.

I am the LORD; that is my name;
my glory I give to no other,
nor my praise to carved idols. - E.S.V.

THE SEVENTH TEN - TEXT 9.

I. - God's Designation.
  1. What promise goes immediately before our text?
    The promise of Redemption by the Servant of the Lord.
  2. What is the relation of the text to this promise?
    ]t confirms it as the promise of the Lord.
  3. Against what had the prophet been speaking in the former chapter?
    Against the gods of Babylon.
  4. What was his argument against them?
    They were unable to predict the future..
  5. What conclusion does the prophet draw from this?
    Isaiah 41., 29.
  6. What then is the contrast between their message and God's?
    God the Lord created the Heavens and brings things to pass.
  7. What name is given to God?
    The name Jehovah.
  8. How is the name Jehovah first revealed?
    " I AM THAT I AM " (
    Exodus 3., 14).
  9. With what verb is the name connected?
    With the verb "to be."
  10. What is Ihe most probable meaning of the word?
    That the changeless God will show Himself in blessing unto His people (in Greek it would mean - "the Coming One").
  11. What is meant by the saying "I am ihe Lord"?
    That the God of Israel is the sole God,
  12. Why was so much stress laid on this?
    Because the Children of Israel were in danger of worshipping the gods of Babylon.
  13. Why was it dangerous to depart from God?
    Because God alone could bring in righteousness and salvation.
II. - Reveals His Character.
  1. How is the true nature of God emphasised?
    By the words "That is my Name."
  2. What is meant by "Name" in Scripture?
    Name stands for person and work.
  3. What is meant by saying here "That is my Name"?
    I alone possess the character of Jehovah.
  4. What great work was God undertaking?
    The work of bringing judgment to the earth.
  5. How does the prophet inspire confidence in this work?
    By calling on Ihe Name of the Lord.
III. - His Glory Incommunicable.
  1. What does God say concerning His glory?
    "My glory will I not give to another."
  2. What is the meaning of the word glory?
    Honour, or excellency.
  3. To what particular honour had God already referred?
    The power of declaring future things.
  4. When is God's honour taken from Him?
    When any other is put in the place of God.
  5. Against what sin does God warn us by these words?
    Against the sin of relying on other powers besides God.
  6. What is the meaning of "Will I not give"?
    I will not suffer another to take My place.
  7. How is this truth expressed in the Second Commandment?
    By God describing Himself as "a jealous God." (
    Exodus 20., 5.)
  8. What is meant by "My Name," etc.?
    That which is due to Me and Me alone.
IV. - His Praise Inimitable.
  1. What is meant by the word "praise"?
    The offering of worship in psalm.
  2. What sin is here condemned?
    The ascribing of that which belongs to God to any creature or representation.
  3. What is meant by "graven image"?
    Anything carved by the hand of man.
  4. How is this command broken?
    By representing God under a sensible image.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What work did God specially reserve to Himself?
    The work of Redemption.
  2. How then do we give His glory to another?
    When we associate creatures with the work of salvation.
  3. Haw does the Church of Rome fall into this error?
    She makes saints and Mary, the mother of Jesus, mediators together with our Lord.
  4. How is God's glory preserved when we accept the prayers of godly people?
    Their prayers are accepted only on the ground of Christ's merits. The saints of the Roman Church are supposed to be heard on account of their special merit.
  5. What use does the Church of Rome make of images?
    She employs them in worship.
  6. What reason does she give for employing them in worship?
    That they help in stirring up the devotions of the people.
  7. With what object does the Church of Rome invite people to bow down before images and burn candles before them?
    "To bring religious thoughts before the minds of the people, by reminding them in the strongest way of holy things." (Bagshawe, Threshold of fht Catholic Church, 1873, London, page 221.)
  8. What was the object of the Babylonian images?
    To bring religious thought before the minds of the people.
  9. How did God condemn them?
    Our Text.
  10. What does the Homily say regarding the worshipping of images?
    " All the outward rites and ceremonies ... is called cultus [culture], to say " worshipping." which is forbidden straitly by God's word to be given to images. (Against Peril of Idolatry. 3rd part, page 233, Edit., Corrie, 1850.)


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2 KINGS 18., 3, 4.

And he did that which was right in the sight of the LORD. according to all that David his father did. He removed the high places, and brake the images, and cut down the groves, and brake in pieces the brazen serpent that Moses had made: for unto those days the children of Israel did burn incense to it: and he called it Nehushtan.




And he did that which was right hi the eyes of the LORD, according to all that David his father had done. He removed the high places, and brake the pillars, and cut down the Asherah: And he brake in pieces the brasen serpent that Moses had made; for unto those days the children of Israel did burn incense to it; and he called it Nehushtan. - R.V.

And he did what was right in the sight of the Lord, according to all that his father David had done. He removed the high places and broke the sacred pillars, cut down the wooden image and broke in pieces the bronze serpent that Moses had made; for until those days the children of Israel burned incense to it, and called it Nehushtan. - N.K.J.V.

And he did what was right in the eyes of the LORD, according to all that David his father had done. He removed the high places and broke the pillars and cut down the Asherah. And he broke in pieces the bronze serpent that Moses had made, for until those days the people of Israel had made offerings to it (it was called Nehushtan). - E.S.V.

THE SEVENTH TEN - TEXT 10.

I. - The Character of a Reformer.
  1. Concerning whom were the words written?
    Hezekiah.
  2. What remarkable event occurred in the early days of Hezekiah's reign?
    The capture of Samaria by Assyria.
  3. What reason is given in 2 Kings for the capture of Samaria?
    See
    2 Kings 18., 12 of this chapter.
  4. What effect had the fall of Samaria on Hezekiah's kingdom?
    It brought Assyria to his door.
  5. Who had warned the people that sin would bring exile?
    The Prophet Isaiah.
  6. What two influences helped Hezekiah?
    The national position and the teaching of Isaiah.
  7. What lesson should we learn from this?
    The duty of seeing God's band in history.
  8. What are we told here of Hezekiah?
    "He did that which was right."
  9. Of how many Kings of Judah is this said?
    Three, Asa,
    1 Kings 15., 11, Hezekiah here, and Josiah, 2 Kings 22., 2.
  10. What fact made it difficult for all three to do what was right?
    They all had wicked fathers.
  11. Can you give one word that includes all that is meant by "did that which was right," etc.?
    Duty.
  12. What does "in the sight of the Lord" mean?
    With a sense that God was looking upon him and had instructed him.
  13. What important lesson do these words teach?
    That we should guide our lives by what God says, not by what others do or say.
  14. Why is "David his father" mentioned?
    Because ihe kingdom was given to David as the man after God's own heart.
  15. What does the mention of David teach us?
    That the good and great men who went before are examples to us (Longfellow, "Lives of great men," etc.).
II. - The Nature of His Reform.
  1. What reforms did Hezekiah undertake?
    "He removed," etc.
  2. What is meant by "high places"?
    Raised mounds or natural elevations where altars were reared to God or to heathen deities.
  3. What is R.V. for "images"7 Pillars.
  4. What were these images or pillars?
    Large upright stones representing the presence of God or of a heathen deity.
  5. What is the R.V. for groves?
    Asherah.
  6. What is meant by Asherah or (plural) Asherim?
    A pole of tree, possibly natural, much more frequently made, regarded as sacred to God or a heathen deity.
  7. Why did Hezekiah remove all these?
    Because they were contrary to the Second Commandment and gave rise to idolatry.
  8. What lesson does this teach us?
    That God ought not to be worshipped by means of images of any kind.
III. - A Special Case of Misplaced Reverence.
  1. To what particular form of worship is special attention given?
    The worship of the brasen serpent,
  2. How is the brasen serpent described?
    "That Moses had made."
  3. When was it made?
    In the wilderness journey about 700 years before,
  4. For what purpose was it made?
    See
    Numbers 21.
  5. At whose command was it made?
    At God's command,
  6. What did Hezekiah do with it?
    Break it in pieces.
  7. What did he call it?
    Nehushtan.
  8. What is the meaning of Nehushtan?
    A piece of brass.
  9. Why did he break it in pieces?
    Because the children of Israel burned incense to it.
  10. What lesson does this teach us?
    Better that ancient and sacred things should go than that they should be an occasion of sin.
  11. How is this taught us in our Prayer Book Preface?
    "The abuses could not well be taken away, the thing remaining still " (Concerning Ceremonies, - B.C.P.)
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What object is held in veneration in the Church of Rome?
    The Crucifix.
  2. What resemblance is there between ihe crucifix end the brasen serpent?
    Both represent our Lord's sacrifice by a sensible image.
  3. What abuse has grown up with the use of the crucifix?
    "Creeping to the Cross."
  4. How did the Reformers deal with the abuse?
    They removed all crucifixes.
  5. What does ihe Church of Rome urge in defence of the crucifix?
    That it reminds men of our Lord's passion.
  6. How does this text justify our attitude towards the crucifix?
    When the brasen serpent which reminded of deliverance was abused Hezekiah is commended for breaking it in pieces.

Additional Texts Mentioned in the Study Questions

Seventh Ten - Text 1
  • Question 7. - But the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned. 1 Corinthans 2., 14.
  • Question 9. - This wisdom descendeth not from above, but is earthly, sensual, devilish. James 3., 15.
    - These be they who separate themselves, sensual, having not the Spirit. Jude 19.
  • Question 10. - - This wisdom descendeth not from above, but is earthly, sensual, devilish. James 3., 15.
    - These be they who separate themselves, sensual, having not the Spirit. Jude 19.
  • Question 12. - 44. It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. There is a natural body, and there is a spiritual body. 45. And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit.
    1 Corinthians 15., 44, 45.
  • Question 14. - For we know that the law is spiritual: but I am carnal, sold under sin. Romans 7., 14.
    - 1. And I, brethren, could not speak unto you as unto spiritual, but as unto carnal, even as unto babes in Christ. 3. For ye are yet carnal: for whereas there is among you envying, and strife, and divisions, are ye not carnal, and walk as men? 1 Corinthians 3., 1, 3.
  • Question 15. - But the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned. 1 Corinthians 2., 14.
  • Question 17. - But God hath revealed them unto us by his Spirit: for the Spirit searcheth all things, yea, the deep things of God. 1 Corinthians 2., 10.
  • Question 20. - But we preach Christ crucified, unto the Jews a stumblingblock, and unto the Greeks foolishness;
    1 Corinthians 1., 23.
  • Question 21. - And I, brethren, if I yet preach circumcision, why do I yet suffer persecution? then is the offense of the cross ceased. Galatians 5., 11.
  • Question 29. - Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God. John 3., 3.
  • Question 30. - These be they who separate themselves, sensual, having not the Spirit. Jude 19.

  • Seventh Ten - Text 2
  • Question 2. - And when the Pharisees saw it, they said unto his disciples, Why eateth your Master with publicans and sinners? Matthew 9., 11.
  • Question 4. - And Levi made him a great feast in his own house: and there was a great company of publicans and of others that sat down with them. Luke 5., 29.
  • Question 23. - For I desired mercy, and not sacrifice; and the knowledge of God more than burnt offerings. Hosea 6., 6.

  • Seventh Ten - Text 3
  • Question 32. - Behold, his soul which is lifted up is not upright in him: but the just shall live by his faith. Habakkuk 2.4.
  • Question 33. - But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith. Galatians 3., 11.
    - Now the just shall live by faith: but if any man draw back, my soul shall have no pleasure in him. Hebrews 10., 38.

  • Seventh Ten - Text 4
  • Question 4. - But ye believe not, because ye are not of my sheep, as I said unto you. John 10., 26.
  • Question 7. - Then came the Jews round about him, and said unto him, How long dost thou make us to doubt? If thou be the Christ, tell us plainly. John 10., 24.
  • Question 8. - My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me: John 10., 27.
  • Question 10. - 3. To him the porter openeth; and the sheep hear his voice: and he calleth his own sheep by name, and leadeth them out.
    4. And when he putteth forth his own sheep, he goeth before them, and the sheep follow him: for they know his voice.
    John 10., 3, 4.
  • Question 11. - 4. And when he putteth forth his own sheep, he goeth before them, and the sheep follow him: for they know his voice. John 10., 4.
  • Question 19. - But he that is an hireling, and not the shepherd, whose own the sheep are not, seeth the wolf coming, and leaveth the sheep, and fleeth: and the wolf catcheth them, and scattereth the sheep. John 10., 12.
  • Question 23. - But go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. Matthew 10., 6.
  • Question 38. - For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost. 2 Peter 1., 21.
    - For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ. 1 Corinthians 3., 11

  • Seventh Ten - Text 5
  • Question 3. - Now it came to pass in the thirtieth year, in the fourth month, in the fifth day of the month, as I was among the captives by the river of Chebar, that the heavens were opened, and I saw visions of God. Ezekiel 1., 1.
  • Question 8. - 24. For I will take you from among the heathen, and gather you out of all countries, and will bring you into your own land. 25. Then will I sprinkle clean water upon you, and ye shall be clean: from all your filthiness, and from all your idols, will I cleanse you. Ezekiel 36., 24, 25.
  • Question 36. - For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of his good pleasure. Philippians 2., 13.
  • Question 38. - Not for your sakes do I this, saith the Lord GOD, be it known unto you: be ashamed and confounded for your own ways, O house of Israel. Ezekiel 36., 32.

  • Seventh Ten - Text 6
  • Question 21. - For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.
    Galatians 5., 14.
  • Question 22. - Envyings, murders, drunkenness, revellings, and such like: of the which I tell you before, as I have also told you in time past, that they which do such things shall not inherit the kingdom of God. Galatians 5., 21.
  • Question 26. - And they that are Christ’s have crucified the flesh with the affections and lusts. Galatians 5., 24.
  • Question 28. - And they that are Christ’s have crucified the flesh with the affections and lusts. Galatians 5., 24.

  • Seventh Ten - Text 7
  • Question 16. - For he built again the high places which Hezekiah his father had broken down, and he reared up altars for Baalim, and made groves, and worshipped all the host of heaven, and served them. 2 Chronicles 33., 3.
  • Question 37. - 8. And I John saw these things, and heard them. And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which shewed me these things. 9. Then saith he unto me, See thou do it not: for I am thy fellowservant, and of thy brethren the prophets, and of them which keep the sayings of this book: worship God.
    Revelation 22., 8, 9.
  • Question 38. - And saith unto him, If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down: for it is written, He shall give his angels charge concerning thee: and in their hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time thou dash thy foot against a stone. Matthew 4., 6.
  • Question 39. - For he shall give his angels charge over thee, to keep thee in all thy ways. Psalm 91., 11.

  • Seventh Ten - Text 8
  • Question 1. - 4. Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one LORD: 5. And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might. Deuteronomy 6., 4, 5.
  • Question 4. - Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one LORD: Deuteronomy 6., 4.
  • Question 10. - 6. And the LORD passed by before him, and proclaimed, The LORD, The LORD God, merciful and gracious, longsuffering, and abundant in goodness and truth, 7. Keeping mercy for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, and that will by no means clear the guilty; visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children, and upon the children’s children, unto the third and to the fourth generation. Exodus 34., 6, 7.
  • Question 16. - Therefore shall ye lay up these my words in your heart and in your soul, and bind them for a sign upon your hand, that they may be as frontlets between your eyes. Deuteronomy 11., 18.
  • Question 17. - And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up. Deuteronomy 6., 7.
  • Question 20. - And that from a child thou hast known the holy scriptures, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. 2 Timothy 3., 15.
  • Question 24. - And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up. Deuteronomy 6., 7.
  • Question 34. - Deuteronomy 11 verse 1. Therefore thou shalt love the LORD thy God, and keep his charge, and his statutes, and his judgments, and his commandments, alway. 11:2 And know ye this day: for I speak not with your children which have not known, and which have not seen the chastisement of the LORD your God, his greatness, his mighty hand, and his stretched out arm, 11:3 And his miracles, and his acts, which he did in the midst of Egypt unto Pharaoh the king of Egypt, and unto all his land; 11:4 And what he did unto the army of Egypt, unto their horses, and to their chariots; how he made the water of the Red sea to overflow them as they pursued after you, and how the LORD hath destroyed them unto this day; 11:5 And what he did unto you in the wilderness, until ye came into this place; 11:6 And what he did unto Dathan and Abiram, the sons of Eliab, the son of Reuben: how the earth opened her mouth, and swallowed them up, and their households, and their tents, and all the substance that was in their possession, in the midst of all Israel: 11:7 But your eyes have seen all the great acts of the LORD which he did. 11:8 Therefore shall ye keep all the commandments which I command you this day, that ye may be strong, and go in and possess the land, whither ye go to possess it; 11:9 And that ye may prolong your days in the land, which the LORD swear unto your fathers to give unto them and to their seed, a land that floweth with milk and honey. 11:10 For the land, whither thou goest in to possess it, is not as the land of Egypt, from whence ye came out, where thou sowedst thy seed, and wateredst it with thy foot, as a garden of herbs: 11:11 But the land, whither ye go to possess it, is a land of hills and valleys, and drinketh water of the rain of heaven: 11:12 A land which the LORD thy God careth for: the eyes of the LORD thy God are always upon it, from the beginning of the year even unto the end of the year. 11:13 And it shall come to pass, if ye shall hearken diligently unto my commandments which I command you this day, to love the LORD your God, and to serve him with all your heart and with all your soul, 11:14 That I will give you the rain of your land in his due season, the first rain and the latter rain, that thou mayest gather in thy corn, and thy wine, and thine oil. 11:15 And I will send grass in thy fields for thy cattle, that thou mayest eat and be full. 11:16 Take heed to yourselves, that your heart be not deceived, and ye turn aside, and serve other gods, and worship them; 11:17 And then the LORD’s wrath be kindled against you, and he shut up the heaven, that there be no rain, and that the land yield not her fruit; and lest ye perish quickly from off the good land which the LORD giveth you. 11:18 Therefore shall ye lay up these my words in your heart and in your soul, and bind them for a sign upon your hand, that they may be as frontlets between your eyes. 11:19 And ye shall teach them your children, speaking of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, when thou liest down, and when thou risest up. 11:20 And thou shalt write them upon the door posts of thine house, and upon thy gates: 11:21 That your days may be multiplied, and the days of your children, in the land which the LORD swear unto your fathers to give them, as the days of heaven upon the earth. 11:22 For if ye shall diligently keep all these commandments which I command you, to do them, to love the LORD your God, to walk in all his ways, and to cleave unto him; 11:23 Then will the LORD drive out all these nations from before you, and ye shall possess greater nations and mightier than yourselves. 11:24 Every place whereon the soles of your feet shall tread shall be yours: from the wilderness and Lebanon, from the river, the river Euphrates, even unto the uttermost sea shall your coast be. 11:25 There shall no man be able to stand before you: for the LORD your God shall lay the fear of you and the dread of you upon all the land that ye shall tread upon, as he hath said unto you. 11:26 Behold, I set before you this day a blessing and a curse; 11:27 A blessing, if ye obey the commandments of the LORD your God, which I command you this day: 11:28 And a curse, if ye will not obey the commandments of the LORD your God, but turn aside out of the way which I command you this day, to go after other gods, which ye have not known. 11:29 And it shall come to pass, when the LORD thy God hath brought thee in unto the land whither thou goest to possess it, that thou shalt put the blessing upon mount Gerizim, and the curse upon mount Ebal. 11:30 Are they not on the other side Jordan, by the way where the sun goeth down, in the land of the Canaanites, which dwell in the champaign over against Gilgal, beside the plains of Moreh? 11:31 For ye shall pass over Jordan to go in to possess the land which the LORD your God giveth you, and ye shall possess it, and dwell therein. 11:32 And ye shall observe to do all the statutes and judgments which I set before you this day. Deuteronomy 11.

  • Seventh Ten - Text 9
  • Question 5. - Behold, they are all vanity; their works are nothing: their molten images are wind and confusion.
    Isaiah 41., 29.
  • Question 8. - And God said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you. Exodus 3., 14.
  • Question 25. - Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;
    Exodus 20., 5.

  • Seventh Ten - Text 10
  • Question 3. - Because they obeyed not the voice of the LORD their God, but transgressed his covenant, and all that Moses the servant of the LORD commanded, and would not hear them, nor do them. 2 Kings 18., 12.
  • Question 9. - And the rest of the acts of Zachariah, behold, they are written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel. 1 Kings 15., 11.
    - And he did that which was right in the sight of the LORD, and walked in all the way of David his father, and turned not aside to the right hand or to the left. 2 Kings 22., 2.
  • Question 27. - Numbers 21:1 And when king Arad the Canaanite, which dwelt in the south, heard tell that Israel came by the way of the spies; then he fought against Israel, and took some of them prisoners. 21:2 And Israel vowed a vow unto the LORD, and said, If thou wilt indeed deliver this people into my hand, then I will utterly destroy their cities. 21:3 And the LORD hearkened to the voice of Israel, and delivered up the Canaanites; and they utterly destroyed them and their cities: and he called the name of the place Hormah. 21:4 And they journeyed from mount Hor by the way of the Red sea, to compass the land of Edom: and the soul of the people was much discouraged because of the way. 21:5 And the people spake against God, and against Moses, Wherefore have ye brought us up out of Egypt to die in the wilderness? for there is no bread, neither is there any water; and our soul loatheth this light bread. 21:6 And the LORD sent fiery serpents among the people, and they bit the people; and much people of Israel died. 21:7 Therefore the people came to Moses, and said, We have sinned, for we have spoken against the LORD, and against thee; pray unto the LORD, that he take away the serpents from us. And Moses prayed for the people. 21:8 And the LORD said unto Moses, Make thee a fiery serpent, and set it upon a pole: and it shall come to pass, that every one that is bitten, when he looketh upon it, shall live. 21:9 And Moses made a serpent of brass, and put it upon a pole, and it came to pass, that if a serpent had bitten any man, when he beheld the serpent of brass, he lived. 21:10 And the children of Israel set forward, and pitched in Oboth. 21:11 And they journeyed from Oboth, and pitched at Ijeabarim, in the wilderness which is before Moab, toward the sunrising. 21:12 From thence they removed, and pitched in the valley of Zared. 21:13 From thence they removed, and pitched on the other side of Arnon, which is in the wilderness that cometh out of the coasts of the Amorites: for Arnon is the border of Moab, between Moab and the Amorites. 21:14 Wherefore it is said in the book of the wars of the LORD, What he did in the Red sea, and in the brooks of Arnon, 21:15 And at the stream of the brooks that goeth down to the dwelling of Ar, and lieth upon the border of Moab. 21:16 And from thence they went to Beer: that is the well whereof the LORD spake unto Moses, Gather the people together, and I will give them water. 21:17 Then Israel sang this song, Spring up, O well; sing ye unto it: 21:18 The princes digged the well, the nobles of the people digged it, by the direction of the lawgiver, with their staves. And from the wilderness they went to Mattanah: 21:19 And from Mattanah to Nahaliel: and from Nahaliel to Bamoth: 21:20 And from Bamoth in the valley, that is in the country of Moab, to the top of Pisgah, which looketh toward Jeshimon. 21:21 And Israel sent messengers unto Sihon king of the Amorites, saying, 21:22 Let me pass through thy land: we will not turn into the fields, or into the vineyards; we will not drink of the waters of the well: but we will go along by the king’s high way, until we be past thy borders. 21:23 And Sihon would not suffer Israel to pass through his border: but Sihon gathered all his people together, and went out against Israel into the wilderness: and he came to Jahaz, and fought against Israel. 21:24 And Israel smote him with the edge of the sword, and possessed his land from Arnon unto Jabbok, even unto the children of Ammon: for the border of the children of Ammon was strong. 21:25 And Israel took all these cities: and Israel dwelt in all the cities of the Amorites, in Heshbon, and in all the villages thereof. 21:26 For Heshbon was the city of Sihon the king of the Amorites, who had fought against the former king of Moab, and taken all his land out of his hand, even unto Arnon. 21:27 Wherefore they that speak in proverbs say, Come into Heshbon, let the city of Sihon be built and prepared: 21:28 For there is a fire gone out of Heshbon, a flame from the city of Sihon: it hath consumed Ar of Moab, and the lords of the high places of Arnon. 21:29 Woe to thee, Moab! thou art undone, O people of Chemosh: he hath given his sons that escaped, and his daughters, into captivity unto Sihon king of the Amorites. 21:30 We have shot at them; Heshbon is perished even unto Dibon, and we have laid them waste even unto Nophah, which reacheth unto Medeba. 21:31 Thus Israel dwelt in the land of the Amorites. 21:32 And Moses sent to spy out Jaazer, and they took the villages thereof, and drove out the Amorites that were there. 21:33 And they turned and went up by the way of Bashan: and Og the king of Bashan went out against them, he, and all his people, to the battle at Edrei. 21:34 And the LORD said unto Moses, Fear him not: for I have delivered him into thy hand, and all his people, and his land; and thou shalt do to him as thou didst unto Sihon king of the Amorites, which dwelt at Heshbon. 21:35 So they smote him, and his sons, and all his people, until there was none left him alive: and they possessed his land. Numbers 21.

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