The One Hundred Texts - Text Set 9 - 2017 Version.
Swanny's
Swaggy's
The One Hundred Texts

Bible studies for an understanding of Reformation Christianity
Text Set 9 -
Questions and Answers


The 10 Text Sets Abbreviations and Notes Words and Expressions Scripture and Studies Index Biblical Order Index Subject and Text Index

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Some Basic Texts     Some important and useful bible texts to understand and remember.
One Hundred Texts     Texts of evangelical and reformed importance arranged by the Irish Church Mission.
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The Text Study Index.
Text Set 1 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 2 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 3 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 4 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 5 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 6 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 7 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 8 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Text Set 9 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Text Set 10 - Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10


THE ONE HUNDRED TEXTS OF THE SOCIETY FOR IRISH CHURCH MISSIONS.

THE NINTH TEN

ROMANS 6., 1, 2.

What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound ?
God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein?




What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?
God forbid. We who died to sin, how shall we any longer live therein? - R.V.

What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin that grace may abound?
Certainly not! How shall we who died to sin live any longer in it? - N.K.J.V.

What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin that grace may abound?
By no means! How can we who died to sin still live in it? - E.S.V.

THE NINTH TEN - TEXT 1.

I. - Two Important Questions.
  1. How does our text commence?
    " What shall we say then?"
  2. What does this question mean?
    What shall we add as a consequence of what has been said?
  3. What had the apostle Paul been saying?
    " Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound " (
    Romans 5., 20).
  4. What lesson had he been trying to teach?
    That freedom from sin has been secured without the aid of the law.
  5. What had he said was the effect of law?
    That it made sin abound.
  6. What is rhe meaning of these words?
    God's law reveals sin in all its horror and shows much to be sin that before had not been so regarded.
  7. What comfort does he give?
    "Where sin abounded," etc. (
    Romans 5., 20.)
II. - With a Startling Conclusion.
  1. What dangerous conclusion does he anticipate?
    " Shall we continue in sin . . .? "
  2. What is the meaning of the argument?
    If grace abounds where sin is found - may we not persist in sin?
  3. What result is supposed to follow from this conduct?
    Glory to God by the magnifying of grace.
  4. What light does this throw on the Apostle's teaching?
    It shows that he taught salvation was a free gift.
  5. What other proof have we of this fact?
    The Jews accused him of teaching " Let us do evil, that good may come" (
    Romans 3., 8).
  6. What lesson can we learn from this?
    That the Bible doctrine of salvation is a doctrine of free grace.
  7. What is meant by the word "grace"?
    God's free unmerited favour.
III. - A Definite Reply.
  1. How does the Apostle reply?
    " God forbid."
  2. What is meant by " God Forbid"?
    There are reasons of piety that it should not be so.
  3. What can we learn from this emphatic rejection of the suggestion in former questions?
    That the Gospel offers no countenance to a life of licence.
  4. How did Paul on a former occasion repudiate this idea?
    By the statement, " Whose damnation is just " (
    Romans 3., 8).
IV. - With a Sufficient Reason.
  1. What does Paul add?
    " How shall we. . . ? "
  2. What is the R.V. for " dead to sin "?
    " We who died to sin, how shall we any longer live therein? "
  3. What is the meaning of "died to sin"?
    Once for all experienced death in relation to sin.
  4. To what incident is Paul referring?
    To the death for us of our Lord on the Cross.
  5. What then is the meaning of the words?
    Sin was the cause of our Lord's death - We died in Him.
  6. What does the text teach us concerning our attitude to sin?
    We can only regard it as the enemy that slew us.
  7. In what two senses may the believer be said to die to sin?
    (a) In respect to its claim,
    (b) In respect to its power.
  8. How does this text show death in respect to the power of sin?
    Christ exhausted sin. His Resurrection proved His complete emancipation. We share in His Resurrection.
  9. What does Paul say is made impossible?
    Living in sin.
  10. What is meant by " living in sin "?
    Moving in a sinful condition as our normal state.
  11. What note of appeal does Paul employ?
    He makes the "we" emphatic.
  12. What does this appeal teach us?
    That one source of victory over sin is realising our position in Christ.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What objection does the Church of Rome make to the doctrine of Justification by Faith only?
    That it leads to licence (i.e., moral carelessness).
  2. What does the Church of Rome mean by faith?
    Mere historic credence (i.e., lays emphasis on belief of the mind).
  3. What does the Bible mean by faith?
    Trust or confidence.
  4. How do we show that our doctrine of justification is true?
    By pointing out that the same objection is made against Paul's teaching.
  5. What further fact is worthy of notice?
    Paul does not modify his teaching in deference to the attack.
  6. What modification of Justification by Faith does Rome give?
    She states that it is obtained by sacraments, but increased by works.
  7. How does our text show this is a mistake?
    Because neither teaching is embodied in Paul's reply.
  8. How do we meet the Roman objection?
    By showing that union with Christ prevents sin.
  9. What do we learn of the power of faith?
    It frees from fear and renews us in spiritual power.
  10. What did Luther call the doctrine of Justification by faith only?
    The doctrine of the standing or the falling of the Church.


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1 JOHN 4., 16.

And we have known and believed the love that God hath to us. God is love;
and he that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God, and God in him.




And we know and have believed the love which God hath in us. God is love;
and he that abideth in love abideth in God, and God abideth in him. - R.V.

And we have known and believed the love that God has for us.
God is love, and he who abides in love abides in God, and God in him. - N.K.J.V.

So we have come to know and to believe the love that God has for us. God is love,
and whoever abides in love abides in God, and God abides in him. - E.S.V.

THE NINTH TEN - TEXT 2.

I. - A Testimony.
  1. Why does this text begin with " And "?
    To connect it closely with what goes before.
  2. What goes immediately before?
    1 John 4., 15.
  3. What connection is there between the two statements?
    God's love in us is realised by faith in Jesus, the Son of God.
  4. What does John say concerning God's love?
    " We have known and believed."
  5. What is meant by "we have known"?
    We have learnt by experience.
  6. How is this experience attained?
    Through Jesus Christ our Lord.
  7. What is meant by "believe"?
    To repose full trust in any person or thing.
  8. What does John say was known and believed?
    " The love that God hath to us."
  9. What text from John's Gospel gives the same message?
    John 3., 16. (First Ten - Text 4, page 13.)
  10. What is R.V. for "to us"?
    " In us."
  11. What is the meaning of God's love in us?
    Either (a) " in our case" R.V. marg., or (b) shed abroad in our souls.
  12. What lesson can we gather from this message?
    That God's love produces an effect in the soul.
  13. How does that effect show itself?
    We realise God's love and put our trust in it.
  14. What does this teach us about spiritual experience?
    That it is a matter of practice rather than of mere head knowledge.
II. - A Definition.
  1. What does John go on to say?
    " God is love."
  2. By what three terms is the nature of God defined by John?
    Love, Light, Spirit.
  3. What is meant by saying God is love?
    Love is the very nature of God.
  4. How is the importance of this message shown?
    It is repeated twice in the chapter (see
    1 John 4., 8).
  5. What error does this truth correct?
    The error of regarding God as a vengeful Being.
  6. What particular form did the manifestation of God's love take?
    The form of propitiation (
    1 John 4., 10).
  7. Against what mistake is this fact a safeguard?
    The mistake of imagining that love cannot punish evil.
  8. What great truth do the two statements in combination teach us?
    That God's love found a way to secure peace for sinners.
III.-- A Condition.
  1. What else does the Apostle say?
    " He that dwelleth in love," etc.
  2. What is meant by "dwelleth"?
    He that remains continually.
  3. What is meant by remaining continuously in love?
    Exhibiting love as our natural and proper condition or state.
  4. What does John say about those who remain in love?
    They dwell in God and God in them.
  5. What lesson does this teach us?
    That true love is only possible to those who are possessed of the Spirit of God.
  6. What is meant by God dwelling in us?
    God taking possession of our heart and life so as to control them.
  7. Through whom do we experience the love of God?
    Through Jesus Christ, God's Son (
    1 John 4., 15).
  8. What does this teach us concerning the nature of this love?
    That it is God's love in which we abide, not our own.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does our text teach us about the character of God?
    That " God is love."
  2. What does it teach us about its - manifestation?
    That it is revealed perfectly in Jesus Christ our Lord.
  3. What doctrine of the Church of Rome tends to weaken the force of this message?
    The invocation of saints and angels.
  4. What particular form of the invocation of saints reflects most seriously on the doctrine of the text?
    The position assigned to Mary, the mother of Jesus.
  5. What names amongst others are given to Mary, the mother of Jesus in the Church of Rome?
    Mother of Mercy; Queen of Heaven; Mother of Sorrows.
  6. What do these names suggest?
    That the Mary has not only a special concern for sinners but a position that renders her intercession effective.
  7. In what Roman book of devotion is this aspect commonly urged?
    The Glories of Mary.
  8. What particular story in The Glories of Mary is most objectionable?
    The story of the two ladders. (See First Ten - Text 10, page 42.)
  9. Why do we object to such teaching?
    It represents our Lord as though He required to be induced to pity the sinner.
  10. What does John tell us?
    That in Jesus Christ the love of God is perfected towards us.


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ISAIAH 43., 25.

I, even I, am he that blotteth out thy transgressions for mine own sake and will not remember thy sins.




I, even I, am he that blotteth out thy transgressions for mine own sake; and I will not remember thy sins. - R.V.

"I, even I, am He who blots out your transgressions for My own sake; And I will not remember your sins." - N.K.J.V.

"I, I am he who blots out your transgressions for my own sake, and I will not remember your sins." - E.S.V.

THE NINTH TEN - TEXT 3.

I. - A Personal Intervention.
  1. Who spoke these words?
    Jehovah, the God of Israel.
  2. Through whom did He speak them?
    The prophet Isaiah.
  3. What complaint does Jehovah bring against Israel?
    Isaiah 43., 22-24.
  4. What made their fault peculiarly grievous?
    Isaiah 43., 21.
  5. What lesson doesthis teach?
    That knowledge always involves responsibility.
  6. How is the effect on God of Israel's sin described?
    Isaiah 43., 24.
  7. What is the meaning of these words?
    That sin causes God to act as a man would who is galled by a burden and tired out by fractiousness.
  8. What solemn truth is here revealed?
    God is not indifferent to sin.
  9. What does it teach us concerning worship?
    It is a delight to the true of heart.
  10. What wonderful words open our text?
    " I, even I, am He that blotteth out thy transgressions."
  11. What part of speech is " I "?
    A Personal Pronoun, First Person.
  12. What is meant by a Personal Pronoun?
    A pronoun which refers to a person.
  13. What is meant by a "person"?
    A being possessing intelligence, and will.
  14. How is this character of God emphasised here?
    By the repetition of the personal pronoun.
  15. What adds still further force to this repetition?
    That it is the message of all these chapters.
  16. What lesson does this teach us?
    That God is One Who can enter into close relation with us.
II. - A Gracious Purpose.
  1. About what relation doesGod here speak?
    His relation to our sin.
  2. What is the first condition of communion with God?
    Blotting out of transgressions.
  3. Who, and Who alone, can blot out transgressions?
    God.
  4. What is the meaning of the word for transgression here?
    Revolt or rebellion.
  5. What is God's complaint at the beginning of the book of Isaiah?
    Isaiah 1., 2. " They have rebelled against me."
  6. What is the promise here?
    That God will blot out the rebellion.
  7. Why is God the only One Who can blot out these transgressions?
    Because the revolt was against Himself.
  8. What is meant by " blotting out" a thing?
    Causing it to disappear entirely, wiping it away.
  9. What else does God promise concerning forgiveness?
    That He will not remember sins.
  10. What is meant by the word " sins " here?
    Failures, missings of the mark.
  11. What is meant by " will not remember"?
    Will neither call to mind nor recount.
  12. What lesson does this teach us?
    That God is able and willing to forgive.
III. - A Sufficient Reason.
  1. What reason does God add for showing mercy?
    He says, " For Mine own sake."
  2. What is meant by " for Mine own sake"?
    God forgives for what He is in Himself, not for what we are. (Or account of my sake, mea gratia.)
  3. What encouragement does this give us?
    Our assurance of pardon is grounded in the nature of God.
  4. What does it teach us concerning God's object in forgiving?
    God forgives us to glorify His Holy Name.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. How does God speak of the Children of Israel in the Book of Isaiah?
    As rebellious children. (
    Isaiah 1., 2.)
  2. What punishment did God send on the children of Israel for rebellion?
    Captivity.
  3. For what is the promise of our text a preparation?
    Restoration.
  4. How are the children of Israel always represented?
    As rebellious children who had forsaken a known law. (
    Isaiah 1., 3, etc.)
  5. What kind of forgiveness is here promised to rebellious children?
    A complete forgiveness. Sins blotted out and not remembered.
  6. What kind of forgiveness does the Church of Rome offer to sinners after baptism?
    Forgiveness of eternal punishment only.
  7. What two results follow from this teaching of the Church of Rome?
    (a) Repentance after Baptism secures only a partial forgiveness.
    (b) The penitent sinner can do something to atone for his sin.
  8. How does our text contradict these two errors?
    (a) God blots out the sins of His repentant rebellious children.
    (b) He does it for His own sake, not for their merits.


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ROMANS 10., 12, 13.

For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.




For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek: for the same Lord is Lord of all, and is rich unto all that call upon him: for, Whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved. - R.V.

For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek, for the same Lord over all is rich to all who call upon Him.
For "whoever calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved." - N.K.J.V.

For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; for the same Lord is Lord of all, bestowing his riches on all who call on him. For "everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved." - E.S.V.

THE NINTH TEN - TEXT 4.

I.- An Assertion of Similarity.
  1. Why does this verse begin with " For "?
    Because it gives a reason for what goes bctore.
  2. What goes before this text?
    The promise of Scripture.
    Romans 10., 11.
  3. What is the meaning of " shall not be put to shame" (R.V.)?
    Shall not be disappointed of their hope.
  4. How does the text quoted here (Isaiah 28., 16) read in our Bible?
    "Shall not make haste."
  5. What is the connection between the two forms?
    There is neither occasion to flee, nor unduly to excite themselves.
  6. From what version did the apostle Paul quote?
    LXX. (The Septuagint)
  7. What is the. difference between the LXX and Paul's quotation?
    Paul adds the word "whosoever" to bring out the universal sense.
  8. What does this teach us concerning the use of God's word?
    That it is the sense of Scripture that really matters.
  9. How can we best get the sense of Scripture?
    By reading it often and pondering on the meaning of the words.
  10. Does Paul always quote from the LXX?
    No. In quoting
    Isaiah 8., 14, in Romans 9., 33, he follows the Hebrew version.
  11. What inference does Paul draw from his quotation from Isaiah?
    " There is no difference."
  12. Where do these words - "There is no difference" - occur before in this Epistle?
    Romans 3., 22. (See Notes, First Ten - Text 1, page 3.)
  13. In what two facts does Paul discover "no difference"?
    Man's sin and God's mercy to those who call upon Him.
  14. What error of the Jews is here condemned?
    The error that their special position excluded the Gentiles from mercy.
  15. What led Paul to say here "There is no difference"?
    He was seeking to prove that the called of God consisted of Jews and Gentiles.
    Romans 9., 24.
  16. How did he seek to establish that fact?
    By quoting from Hosea and Isaiah.
II.- The Reason for It.
  1. What reason does Paul give for saying " there is no difference"?
    The same Lord is over Jew and Gentile.
  2. What does this teach us concerning Paul's interpretation of the Old Testament prophets?
    He taught that they preached One God over the whole earth.
  3. In what speech did Paul express this great truth?
    In his speech at Athens.
    Acts 17., 26.
III. - A Declaration of Mercy.
  1. What does Paul say concerning the character of this One God?
    He "is rich unto all that call upon Him."
  2. What is meant by saying God is rich unto those who call on Him?
    That He Who is God of all abounds in goodness to those who seek Him.
  3. To whom do these words refer?
    To our Lord Jesus Christ (see
    Romans 10., 9, " Jesus as Lord," R.V.).
  4. To Whom are they referred in the Old Testament?
    To Jehovah, the God of Israel.
    Joel 2., 32.
  5. What does this teach us?
    That Paul regarded our Lord Jesus Christ as truly and in all respects God.
  6. Of what does the "richness" of Christ assure us?
    That He is sufficient for all our needs and for the needs of all.
IV.- The Condition of It.
  1. To whom is the Lord said to be rich?
    To those who call upon Him.
  2. What is meant by calling on the Lord?
    Asking Him for help and blessing.
  3. What is meant by "The name of the Lord"?
    The Person and work of the Lord.
  4. What blessing is promised to those who "call on the name of the Lord"?
    They shall be saved.
  5. What is meant by "shall be saved"?
    Delivered from the penalty and power of sin.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does Paul call his message in a previous verse?
    " The word of faith,"
    Romans 10., 8.
  2. With what does he contrast the word of faith?
    With "the righteousness which is of the law,"
    Romans 10., 5.
  3. What is "the righteousness of the law"?
    See
    Romans 10., 5.
  4. What is the righteousness which is of faith?
    Romans 10., 9, 10, 11.
  5. What conditions are laid down for obtaining this righteousness of faith?
    Confession with the mouth and belief in the heart.
  6. What is the doctrine that righteousness comes by faith?
    "Justification by Faith."
  7. What does the word "Justify " mean?
    To account righteous, to treat us as though we had not sinned.
  8. What does the Church of Rome say "Justify " means?
    To make righteous.
  9. What kind of righteousness would this give us?
    Righteousness which is of the Law.
  10. What does our text tell us?
    We are justified by believing in our heart, not by doing the works of the law.


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ROMANS 8., 14,15.

For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, they are the sons of God. For ye have not received
the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father.




For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are sons of God. For ye received
not the spirit of bondage again unto fear; but ye received the spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father. - R.V.

For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are sons of God. For you did not receive the spirit
of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption by whom we cry out, "Abba, Father." - N.K.J.V.

For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God. For you did not receive the spirit of slavery
to fall back into fear, but you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, "Abba! Father!" - E.S.V.

THE NINTH TEN - TEXT 5.

I. - -A Divine Leading.
  1. Why does this text begin with " For"?
    Because it gives a reason for what goes before.
  2. What was the Apostle Paul speaking about just before this text?
    Mortifying the deeds of the body.
  3. What is meant by " mortify the deeds of the body"?
    Making our evil actions to die.
  4. How does our text say this is accomplished?
    By being led by the Spirit.
  5. What is meant by being led by the Spirit?
    Submitting ourselves to the guidance and influence of the Spirit.
  6. How may we assure ourselves that we are led by the Spirit?
    When we follow the will of God as revealed by Himself in the Scriptures.
II. - A Characteristic of Sonship.
  1. What is said of those who are led by the Spirit?
    That "they are the Sons of God."
  2. What is meant by being a son of God?
    Being received into God's family and being made like God.
  3. What kind of a nature does God possess?
    A holy nature.
  4. What then must we be if we are to be sons of God?
    We must be holy.
  5. How does the text tell us this holiness is secured?
    By being led of the Spirit.
  6. What important lesson does this teach us?
    That we become like God by yielding to God the Holy Ghost.
  7. What warning is given to us by the text?
    A warning against any idea that pardon can ever be unaccompanied by holiness.
  8. How is the idea that holiness accompanies pardon given to us in the early verses of this chapter?
    By the statement that those who are not condemned walk not after the flesh but after the Spirit.
  9. What two lessons are thus taught us?
    (1) We can only become holy by being led of the Spirit of God.
    (2) We can only be sons of God by being led of the Spirit.
III.- The Nature of the Spirit Received.
  1. How is the fact that we can only be holy through the Spirit further emphasised?
    Because Paul speaks of taking, or receiving, the Spirit.
  2. What idea is contained in "taking" or "receiving" anything?
    The idea of something offered which we did not formerly possess.
  3. Against what mistake does Paul warn them?
    Against regarding the Spirit as a Spirit of bondage.
  4. What is meant by " the spirit of bondage"?
    A Spirit that makes us feel that we are in servitude.
  5. What would be the effect of the spirit of bondage?
    It would make us render a sullen and unwilling obedience.
  6. What does Paul say accompanies the spirit of bondage?
    Fear.
  7. Why does fear enter into the service of those in bondage?
    Because they dread the anger of their master and offer no service of love.
  8. Why does Paul use the words " again to fear "?
    To show us that the new life of the Spirit is altogether different from the old life with its sense of God's wrath.
  9. What is the character of the Spirit we receive?
    " The Spirit of adoption."
  10. What is meant by "the Spirit of adoption"?
    The Spirit that causes us to realise that we are in the family of God.
  11. What service then should we render to God?
    The service of those who are truly His children.
  12. What is meant by the word "adoption"?
    It means reckoned as sons.
  13. To what custom was Paul probably referring?
    The Roman custom of conferring all the privileges of family upon one who was not born in the house.
  14. How do we know that Paul is referring to the privileges of the house?
    Because in
    Romans 8., 23 he says our adoption is completed at the resurrection.
IV.- The Consequence of Adoption.
  1. What is the result of adoption?
    " We cry, Abba, Father."
  2. What is meant by saying " we cry, Abba, Father"?
    That God is recognised by us as our Heavenly Father and we can talk freely to Him.
  3. What is the lesson taught us by the contrast?
    Those who are not adopted are in fear, and the things of God are a form of slavery to them. Those who receive the Spirit lose all fear and rejoice in God the Father.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome teach is meant by Justification?
    A state in which we are made righteous by the grace of God.
  2. How does she say this justification may be increased?
    By good works, such as giving alms, denying ourselves, afflicting the body, etc.
  3. What does she teach concerning the continuance of justification?
    It continues only until such time as we fall into mortal sin.
  4. What is meant by "a mortal sin "?
    A sin that deprives the soul of justifying grace.
  5. How does Paul teach that we mortify the deeds of the body?
    By being led by the Holy Spirit Whom we receive.
  6. What does this teach us concerning Sanctification?
    That it is God's work in us and not our work in preserving justification.
  7. In what sense only may sanctification be said to be our work?
    In the sense that the Holy Spirit works through our understanding, feeling and will, causing us to serve God in our bodies and our spirits.
  8. What lies at the heart of all such spiritual actions?
    A certainty wrought by the Spirit that we are accepted of God for Christ's sake.


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1 THESSALONIANS 2., 13.

For this cause also thank we God without ceasing, because, when ye received the word
of God which ye heard of us, ye received it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth,
the word of God, which effectually worketh also in you that believe.




And for this cause we also thank God without ceasing, that, when ye received from us the word
of the message, even the word of God, ye accepted it not as the word of men, but, as it is in truth,
the word of God, which also worketh in you that believe. - R.V.

For this reason we also thank God without ceasing, because when you received the word
of God which you heard from us, you welcomed it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth,
the word of God, which also effectively works in you who believe. - N.K.J.V.

And we also thank God constantly for this, that when you received the word of God,
which you heard from us, you accepted it not as the word of men but as what it really is,
the word of God, which is at work in you believers - E.S.V.

THE NINTH TEN - TEXT 6.

I. - A Cause of Thanksgiving.
  1. Who are represented as giving thanks?
    1 Thessalonians 1., 1.
  2. Why does Paul say "we also" (R.V.)?
    To join himself and his companions with those in Macedonia and Achaia.
  3. What was the occasion of this thanksgiving?
    Either (1) The calling to kingdom and glory,
    1 Thessalonians 2., 12, or that
    (2) They received the message as the Word of God, 1 Thessalonians 2., 13.
  4. What is the peculiarity about this thanksgiving?
    That it is without ceasing.
  5. What is meant by "without ceasing"?
    That a permanent sense of thankfulness was in their minds.
  6. What does this teach us?
    The faith of others should be an occasion of joy to us.
II. - A Message Received.
  1. About what does Paul go on to speak?
    The Word of God.
  2. What is the first thing he says?
    " Ye received the word."
  3. What is the meaning of the word " received " here?
    Simply took, without any suggestion of doubt. (See Note.)
  4. From whom did they hear?
    From Paul and his companions.
  5. What does Paul claim for his message?
    That it is the Word of God.
  6. What does this teach us?
    Men spoke: God gave the message.
III. - A Distinction Made.
  1. What possible mistake might the manner of the message occasion?
    It might be regarded as the word of men only.
  2. What name is given to God's influence on the messengers?
    Inspiration.
  3. What does Paul tell us here is the effect of inspiration?
    It makes the message God's Word.
  4. What does this teach us about the Bible?
    It is more than a collection of the opinions of men.
  5. What does this teach us about our attitude to the Bible?
    That we ought to reverence it as different from all other books.
  6. Why did God speak His words through men?
    So that His message would be given in a way that all could understand.
  7. What does Paul say the Thessalonians did on hearing the message?
    They received it as the Word of God.
  8. Again, what is meant by the word translated " received " here?
    To receive gladly with acceptance in the heart.
  9. What does the contrast between the two Greek words for receive teach us?
    It is not enough to listen to God's Word, we must accept it.
  10. What verse in the Psalms gives us this idea?
    Psalm 119., 11.
IV. - An Effective Result.
  1. What was the effect of welcoming God's Word?
    It worked effectually.
  2. What does this teach us about the Bible?
    Its message influences our lives.
  3. What important lesson does this teach us?
    That we should learn God's Word with great care.
  4. What is meant by the word "effectually"?
    That the Word produces an effect (is active in us).
  5. What was the first effect of God's Word on the Thessalonians?
    1 Thessalonians 1., 9.
  6. How may we know God's Word worketh effectually?
    By changed lives.
  7. In whom does God's Word work effecrually?
    In them that believe.
  8. What then is the condition of all blessing?
    Faith in God.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does the Church of Rome add to God's Word?
    Traditions and the interpretation of the Church.
  2. What difficulty attaches to this?
    God's Word and man's word are joined together in one Rule of Faith.
  3. How do we know that Traditions are the words of men?
    They contradict one another and we know how many arose.
  4. What admission is made by Roman Catholics on this point?
    Cardinal Manning says, None of the Fathers were free from error except Gregory Nanzianzen.
    (Temporal Mission of the Holy Ghost). "This special authority which attaches to the Fathers as witnesses, does not cover every sentiment that is found in their writings; especially, in their interpretation of Scripture." S. J. Hunter, S.J., Outlines of Dogmatic Theology, 1895, Volume 1., Page 136.)
    "Among human writers, absolute certainty belongs only to the Roman Pontiff when speaking ex cathedra" (ibid., page 138). He cites the cases of Augustine and Cyprian.
  5. On what ground did Apostles claim acceptance of their message?
    On the ground that it was the Word of God.
  6. On what ground did the Thessalonians receive blessing?
    On the ground that they received the Word of God.
  7. What made the difference between the message and all others?
    Not the writing, nor speaking, but the character of the message.
  8. What would the Church of Rome have to do before we accept her Tradition?
    To prove that her Tradition is the Word of God.
  9. How do you know the Church of Rome does not make any such claim?
    In the Council of Trent, she claims that the Old and New Testaments have God for their Author, but makes no such claim for Tradition.
  10. What is the safe and Apostolic course?
    To receive God's Word only.


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JAMES 1., 21, 22.

Wherefore lay apart all filthiness and superfluity of naughtiness,
and receive with meekness the engrafted word, which is able to save your souls.
But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves.




Wherefore putting away all filthiness and overflowing of wickedness,
receive with meekness the implanted word, which is able to save your souls.
But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deluding your own selves. - R.V.

Therefore lay aside all filthiness and overflow of wickedness,
and receive with meekness the implanted word, which is able to save your souls.
But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. - N.K.J.V.

Therefore put away all filthiness and rampant wickedness
and receive with meekness the implanted word, which is able to save your souls.
But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. - E.S.V.

THE NINTH TEN - TEXT 7.

I. - A Command to Renounce.
  1. Who wrote these words?
    The apostle James.
  2. Who was James?
    Our Lord's brother.
  3. Why does the text begin with "Wherefore "?
    To show the need of this action by what goes before.
  4. What goes before our text?
    See
    James 1., 20.
  5. What is the first thing the text commands?
    " Lay apart all filthiness," etc.
  6. What is meant by "lay apart "?
    Put away.
  7. What is the meaning of the word "filthiness"?
    That which is foul or dirty.
  8. What is the R.V. for "superfluity of naughtiness"?
    "Overflowing of wickedness."
  9. What is the meaning of "naughtiness " here?
    Most probably spiteful, malignant feeling.
  10. What picture does this warning give us?
    A field overgrown with weeds and hence polluted.
II. - A Command to Receive.
  1. What does James further command?
    " Receive with meekness," etc.
  2. What does the word translated "receive" mean?
    Welcome eagerly.
  3. What were they to receive?
    The engrafted word.
  4. Of whom is it said that they received God's Word after this sort?
    The Thessalonians. (Ninth Ten - Text 6, page 439.)
  5. In what spirit is the word to be received?
    In meekness.
  6. What is the meaning of "receive with meekness"?
    In a mild or gentle spirit.
  7. What advice similar to this is given just before in the chapter?
    James 1., 19.
  8. What warning about hearing does this give us?
    To put aside prejudice and personal hostility and come with a quiet mind to the study of God's Word.
  9. What name is given to the Gospel here?
    "The engrafted word."
  10. What is meant by "engrafted"?
    "To insert a shoot of one tree into another."
  11. What does this teach us?
    That the word sown in our heart and mind must be received by us as a message to our souls before it brings forth fruit.
III. - A Command to Act.
  1. What warning does James add?
    James 1., 22.
  2. Why does the verse begin with "But"?
    To contrast two ways of receiving the word.
  3. What two ways are contrasted?
    Doing and hearing.
  4. What is meant by being a "doer" of the word?
    Making God's Word live in our daily actions - putting it into practice.
  5. What kind of person is one who only hears God's Word?
    One who may be impressed indeed, but fails to act.
IV. - A Warning Against Self-Deceit.
  1. What does James say of a "hearer"?
    He deceives his own self.
  2. What kind of deception is here spoken about?
    The kind that comes from false reasoning.
  3. In what false way does the hearer reason?
    He thinks that because he attends at the time to God's Word he is quite secure.
  4. What lesson does this teach us?
    It is God's Word carried into action in our lives that blesses us, compare
    John 13., 17.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does James say God's Word can do?
    That it "is able to save our souls."
  2. How does our Sixth Article express this?
    "Holy Scripture containeth all things necessary to salvation."
  3. What results from this?
    "That whatsoever is not read therein, nor may be proved thereby is not to be required of any man, that it should be believed as an article of the Faith." - Article vi.
  4. What two duties concerning God's Word are laid on us in this text?
    To receive it and to practise it.
  5. What is necessary if we are to receive and to practise God's Word?
    We must know it.
  6. How does James suggest that his readers knew God's Word?
    He speaks of it as "implanted." (R.V.)
  7. What practice of the Church of Rome hinders people from knowing God's Word?
    The usual reading of it in a foreign language in church.
  8. What is the Church of Rome's attitude to the Bible in schools?
    She objects to children reading it in school, or committing portions of it to memory.
  9. What fact illustrates this attitude in Ireland?
    The Scripture Lessons drawn up by the National Board for use it schools had to be withdrawn.
  10. How does our text condemn such action?
    By exhorting all to receive and act upon God's Word.


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ISAIAH 26., 3, 4.

Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on thee because he trusteth in thee.
Trust ye in the LORD for ever: for in the LORD JEHOVAH is everlasting strength.




Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on thee: because he trusteth in thee.
Trust ye in the LORD for ever: for in the LORD JEHOVAH is an everlasting rock. - R.V.

You will keep him in perfect peace, Whose mind is stayed on You, Because he trusts in You.
Trust in the Lord forever, For in Yah, the Lord, is everlasting strength. - N.K.J.V.

You keep him in perfect peace
whose mind is stayed on you,
because he trusts in you.
Trust in the LORD forever,
for the LORD GOD is an everlasting rock. - E.S.V.

THE NINTH TEN - TEXT 8.

I. - A Happy Condition.
  1. Of what are these words a part?
    Of a song of triumph.
  2. Where was the song to be sung?
    In the land of Judah.
  3. What kind of people were to sing it?
    "The righteous nation " mentioned in
    Isaiah 26., 2.
  4. What blessing is promised in our text?
    Perfect peace.
  5. In what words is the blessing promised?
    "Thou wilt keep him," etc.
  6. To Whom is reference made in these words?
    To God.
  7. What lesson does this tcach us?
    Perfect peace comes from God.
  8. Of what does the word "keep" give us assurance?
    That God's power will be used on our behalf.
II. - A Mental Attitude.
  1. What kind of a person is kept in perfect peace?
    One whose mind is stayed on God.
  2. What is meant by the word "stayed " ?
    That which is supported or rests on something.
  3. What is meant here by "mind"?
    Thought, or imagination.
  4. How does this teach us that peace is secured?
    By continually thinking on and trusting God.
  5. Against what evil does our text warn us?
    Wavering or uncertainty.
  6. What causes us to waver or to be uncertain?
    Looking away from God, to ourselves, or to the world around.
  7. What does our text tell us is the best way to recover confidence?
    To stay our mind on the Lord, that is, to lean afresh on Him for strength and blessing.
  8. What additional words explain "whose mind is stayed" ?
    "Because he trusteth," etc.
  9. What do these words tell us?
    That the man who trusts is grounded in God.
  10. Why does trust bring peacc?
    Because God's promises are to those who trust.
III. - A Direct Exhortation.
  1. How does the prophet enforce the lesson?
    By saying "Trust ye," etc.
  2. In Whom are we to trust?
    In the Lord.
  3. For what does the word Lord stand?
    JEHOVAH - the God of promise and Covenant.
  4. What words are added to the command "Trust ye" ?
    "For ever."
  5. Why are these words added?
    To show that our trust must be continual.
  6. How is this idea expressed in the Church Catechism?
    "And I pray unto God to give me his grace, that I may continue in the same unto my life's end "
IV. - For a Sufficient Reason.
  1. What encouragement to continual trust is given?
    "In the Lord JEHOVAH," etc.
  2. What is the marginal reading for "everlasting strength"?
    "The rock of ages."
  3. Why is the Name of God repeated?
    To show us that it is God as He reveals Himself in Whom we are invited to trust.
  4. What idea does a rock convey?
    The idea of stability, endurance.
  5. How is this idea further strengthened in the text?
    By adding the word "everlasting."
  6. What message is given to us by those strong words?
    God is eternal and changeless and can never fail those who trust in Him.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. Again, in Whom are we invited to trust?
    The Lord JEHOVAH.
  2. Why are we invited to trust in Him?
    Because of His everlasting strength.
  3. With whom are those who trust in God contrasted?
    With proud people who have no such trust (
    Isaiah 26., 5).
  4. What lesson does Isaiah here teach about religious trust?
    It should be placed in God alone.
  5. What reasons are given in the text for this?
    (a) Trust in God establishes the heart and fixes the thought.
    (b) God alone is a rock of eternities - always the same.
  6. On what is the Roman Catholic taught to depend?
    On the living speaking voice of the Church.
  7. For what is he taught to depend on the Church?
    For the true explanation of God's promises and invitations.
  8. What effect has this on direct trust in God?
    It hinders direct acceptance of God's promises, unless they be sanctioned by the Church.
  9. What practical result often follows?
    There is greater anxiety to follow the Church than to follow God.
  10. How does the prophet correct this?
    "Trust ye in the Lord for ever," etc.


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1 CORINTHIANS 11., 26.

For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.




For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink the cup, ye proclaim the Lord's death till he come. - R.V.

For as often as you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord's death till He comes. - N.K.J.V.

For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord's death until he comes. - E.S.V.

THE NINTH TEN - TEXT 9.

I. - A Continued Practice.
  1. Why does our text begin with "For" ?
    To give a reason for what goes before.
  2. What goes before our text?
    1 Corinthians 11., 25.
  3. What actions are commanded by our Lord?
    The eating the bread and the drinking of the cup.
  4. To what does the word "for " relate?
    To eating and drinking.
  5. For what purpose did our Lord say we were to eat and to drink?
    For a remembrance of Him.
  6. How, then, do Christians remember the Lord?
    By eating and drinking according to His command.
  7. What words follow the word "For"?
    "As often as ye eat," etc.
  8. What is meant by "as often" ?
    As many times as the particular act is repeated.
  9. Why does the apostle Paul add "this bread"?
    To distinguish this particular action from ordinary meals.
  10. What is the peculiarity of "this bread"?
    It has been chosen for a particular purpose.
  11. For what purpose has the bread and wine been chosen?
    To shew (proclaim) the Lord's death till He come.
  12. For what purpose do we eat ordinary food?
    To strengthen our bodies.
  13. Where was the bread eaten of which our text speaks?
    In the public assembly of Christians (
    1 Corinthians 11., 20).
  14. Where are people told to satisfy their hunger?
    At home.
  15. What does this teach us?
    That the Holy Communion is distinct from ordinary meals.
II. - A Special Announcement
  1. How does the eating and drinking call our Lord to remembrance?
    It shews His death.
  2. What does "ye do shew " mean?
    "Ye announce."
  3. In connection with what Old Testament feast is the word "shew " used?
    The Passover (
    Exodus 13., 8). In LXX the word for "shew" is used.
  4. What does "ye do shew the Lord's death " mean?
    By our actions publishing it to others.
  5. What common error is made in quoting this text?
    "Ye do shew forth."
  6. What mistake is often made as a result of this error?
    Thinking the Communion is a presentation to God.
  7. What facts shew this is not so?
    (1) It is a remembrance, (2) It refers to our actions, (3) It speaks of an Absent One.
    (Present by faith in the heart of the believer).
  8. What does Paul say is shewn or announced?
    The Lord's death.
  9. How is the Lord's death particularly shewn?
    By the separate partaking of bread and wine.
  10. What connection has this "shewing" with "remembrance"?
    We remember the past. The Lord's death is past.
III. - An Expected Event.
  1. What does Paul add?
    "Till He come."
  2. How long then is Holy Communion to be observed?
    Until our Lord's bodily return.
  3. Why does it then cease?
    Because the Lord bodily absent until then is again bodily present to His people.
  4. What two truths are brought together in every Communion?
    Jesus died for sinners and comes for His saints.
  5. What is the full teaching of the text?
    Christians should meet to remember and to proclaim the Lord's death by eating bread and drinking wine until such time as He shall come again.
IV. - Error Condemned.
  1. What does Paul say the Corinthian Christians ate and drank?
    Bread and Wine.
  2. What does he say the Lord took?
    Bread and wine.
  3. What does the Church of Rome say Christians eat?
    The combined body and blood of the Lord Jesus Christ.
  4. What does the Church of Rome say the Lord Jesus took?
    Bread and wine.
  5. To what does she attribute the change to our Lord's Body and Blood?
    To the words of consecration.
  6. What results from this supposed change?
    The Lord Himself is there, before there is Communion.
  7. What does Paul say is shewn?
    The Lord's death.
  8. If the Lord's Body were present in what condition would it be?
    In a condition of death.
  9. What does this dearly shew?
    Our Lord's Body cannot be there for it is not now in a condition of death.
  10. What other proof of the Lord's bodily absence is given?
    We show His death till He come; which can only mean, come in His Resurrection Body.


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1 CORINTHIANS 14., 19.

Yet in the church I had rather speak five words with my understanding,
that by my voice I might teach others also, than ten thousand words in an unknown tongue.




Howbeit in the church I had rather speak five words with my understanding,
that I might instruct others also, than ten thousand words in a tongue. - R.V.

Yet in the church I would rather speak five words with my understanding,
that I may teach others also, than ten thousand words in a tongue. - N.K.J.V.

Nevertheless, in church I would rather speak five words with my mind in order
to instruct others, than ten thousand words in a tongue. - E.S.V.

THE NINTH TEN - TEXT 10.

I. - A Significant Desire.
  1. Who spoke these words?
    The apostle Paul.
  2. What led him to speak them?
    An abuse in the Church of Corinth.
  3. What was the abuse?
    Confusion in public services.
  4. How did it arise?
    Over eagerness to exercise the gift of tongues.
  5. How do we know that Paul had this gift?
    1 Corinthians 14., 18.
  6. To what wish does he give expression?
    " I had rather speak five words with my understanding," etc.
  7. What lesson does this teach us?
    That discretion should be used in the exercise of special gifts.
  8. How is this enforced later in the Epistle?
    1 Corinthians 14., 32.
II. - Because of a Place.
  1. To what place does Paul refer?
    " The church."
  2. What is meant by the word "church " ?
    The congregation.
  3. What does this teach us about early assemblies?
    Exhortation was an important part.
  4. What does his teach us?
    God designs His preached word as a help to Christians.
  5. Against what evil does this warn us?
    The evil of neglecting the opportunity of hearing the preaching of God's Word.
III. - Because of a Character.
  1. What does Paul say he would prefer to do?
    To speak five words with understanding rather than ten thousand in an unknown tongue.
  2. What is meant by speaking "with my understanding"?
    Speaking with sense or intelligence.
  3. How does he explain speaking with sense?
    Speaking so that his meaning is plain to others.
  4. Why is it necessary to speak plainly in the church?
    Because the gathering is expressly to hear the truth of God.
  5. What is the effect of such plain speaking?
    It has a convincing effect on the hearers (
    1 Corinthians 14., 24).
IV. - Because of an Object.
  1. What does this teach us as to the object of speaking?
    That it should help the hearers.
  2. What was Paul's desire in speaking?
    That he might teach others.
  3. With what does he contrast speaking with understanding?
    Speaking with a tongue.
  4. What difference is there between R.V. and A.V. here?
    The word " unknown " is omitted.
  5. Why was the word "unknown" omitted in the R.V.?
    To bring out the contrast dearly.
  6. What is the meaning of the word "tongue" ?
    A language, or dialect.
  7. What does Paul argue?
    That to speak in an unknown language is to be useless to the hearers.
  8. What is the use of a "tongue" thus understood?
    It attracts attention (
    1 Corinthians 14., 22).
  9. What is speaking with the understanding called?
    Prophesying.
  10. What is the object of prophecy?
    To help those who believe (
    1 Corinthians 14 verse 22).
  11. How are believers helped by prophecy?
    It makes clear some truth of God's Word.
  12. How does Paul finish his argument?
    1 Corinthians 14., 39, 40.
V. - Error Condemned.
  1. What evil results from speaking in a language that is not known?
    1 Corinthians 14., 16.
  2. In what language is the Roman service conducted?
    In the Latin tongue.
  3. Why is it read in Latin?
    Because formerly all the people in Europe spoke Latin.
  4. What name given the Latin Bible shows this?
    The Vulgate.
  5. What is meant by the Vulgate?
    The Bible in the common speech of the people, compare Lat. vulgus, the people. "So soon as he can say the Creed ... in the vulgar tongue." English Book of Common Prayer Public Baptism of Infants.
  6. Where does Paul say the usual speech should be employed?
    In the church.
  7. What defence is urged for saying Mass in Latin?
    It is not a form of public prayer; a Roman Catholic does not go to Mass to join in the words which the priest is saying, but to take part in the action which he is doing.
  8. How does Paul anticipate and correct this argument?
    1 Corinthian 14., 16.
  9. To what three parts of the service does Paul refer in his argument?
    Praying, praising and prophesying (
    1 Corinthians 14., 15, 24).
  10. What conclusion is forced on us?
    That all the public services of the church should be rendered in the tongue best understood by the people.

Additional Texts Mentioned in the Study Questions

Ninth Ten - Text 1
  • Question 3. - Moreover the law entered, that the offense might abound. But where sin abounded, grace did much more abound: Romans 5., 20.
  • Question 7. - Moreover the law entered, that the offense might abound. But where sin abounded, grace did much more abound: Romans 5., 20.
  • Question 12. - And not rather, (as we be slanderously reported, and as some affirm that we say,) Let us do evil, that good may come? whose damnation is just. Romans 3., 8.
  • Question 18. - And not rather, (as we be slanderously reported, and as some affirm that we say,) Let us do evil, that good may come? whose damnation is just. Romans 3., 8.

  • Ninth Ten - Text 2
  • Question 2. - Whosoever shall confess that Jesus is the Son of God, God dwelleth in him, and he in God. 1 John 4., 15.
  • Question 9. - For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. John 3., 16.
  • Question 18. - He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love. 1 John 4., 8.
  • Question 20. - Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins. 1 John 4., 10.
  • Question 29. - Whosoever shall confess that Jesus is the Son of God, God dwelleth in him, and he in God. 1 John 4., 15.

  • Ninth Ten - Text 3
  • Question 3. - 22. But thou hast not called upon me, O Jacob; but thou hast been weary of me, O Israel. 23. Thou hast not brought me the small cattle of thy burnt offerings; neither hast thou honored me with thy sacrifices. I have not caused thee to serve with an offering, nor wearied thee with incense. 24. Thou hast bought me no sweet cane with money, neither hast thou filled me with the fat of thy sacrifices: but thou hast made me to serve with thy sins, thou hast wearied me with thine iniquities. Isaiah 43., 22-24.
  • Question 4. - This people have I formed for myself; they shall shew forth my praise. Isaiah 43., 21.
  • Question 6. - I will say to the north, Give up; and to the south, Keep not back: bring my sons from far, and my daughters from the ends of the earth; Isaiah 43., 6.
  • Question 21. - Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth: for the LORD hath spoken, I have nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against me. Isaiah 1., 2.
  • Question 33. - Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth: for the LORD hath spoken, I have nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against me. Isaiah 1., 2.
  • Question 36. - The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master's crib: but Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider. Isaiah 1., 3. etc.

  • Ninth Ten - Text 4
  • Question 2. - For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. Romans 10., 11.
  • Question 4. - Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD, Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste. Isaiah 28., 16.
  • Question 10. - And he shall be for a sanctuary; but for a stone of stumbling and for a rock of offense to both the houses of Israel, for a gin and for a snare to the inhabitants of Jerusalem. Isaiah 8., 14.
    - As it is written, Behold, I lay in Sion a stumblingstone and rock of offense: and whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. Romans 9., 33.
  • Question 12. - Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe: for there is no difference: Romans 3., 22.
  • Question 15. - Even us, whom he hath called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles? Romans 9., 24.
  • Question 19. - And hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined the times before appointed, and the bounds of their habitation; Acts 17., 26.
  • Question 22. - That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. Romans 10., 9.
  • Question 23. - And it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall call on the name of the LORD shall be delivered: for in mount Zion and in Jerusalem shall be deliverance, as the LORD hath said, and in the remnant whom the LORD shall call. Joel 2., 32.
  • Question 31. - But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach; Romans 10., 8.
  • Question 32. - For Moses describeth the righteousness which is of the law, That the man which doeth those things shall live by them. Romans 10., 5.
  • Question 33. - For Moses describeth the righteousness which is of the law, That the man which doeth those things shall live by them. Romans 10., 5.
  • Question 34. - 9. That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. 10. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. 11. For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.
    Romans 10., 9-11.

  • Ninth Ten - Text 5
  • Question 29. - And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body. Romans 8., 23.

  • Ninth Ten - Text 6
  • Question 1. - Paul, and Silvanus, and Timotheus, unto the church of the Thessalonians which is in God the Father and in the Lord Jesus Christ: Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ.
    1 Thessalonians 1., 1.
  • Question 3. - That ye would walk worthy of God, who hath called you unto his kingdom and glory.
    1 Thessalonians 2., 12.
    - For this cause also thank we God without ceasing, because, when ye received the word of God which ye heard of us, ye received it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, which effectually worketh also in you that believe. 1 Thessalonians 2., 13.
  • Question 22. - Thy word have I hid in mine heart, that I might not sin against thee. Psalm 119., 11
  • Question 27. - For they themselves shew of us what manner of entering in we had unto you, and how ye turned to God from idols to serve the living and true God; 1 Thessalonians 1., 9.

  • Ninth Ten - Text 7
  • Question 4. - For the wrath of man worketh not the righteousness of God. James 1., 20.
  • Question 17. - Wherefore, my beloved brethren, let every man be swift to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath:
    James 1., 19.
  • Question 22. - But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves. James 1., 22.
  • Question 30. - If ye know these things, happy are ye if ye do them. John 13., 17.

  • Ninth Ten - Text 8
  • Question 3. - Open ye the gates, that the righteous nation which keepeth the truth may enter in. Isaiah 26., 2.
  • Question 33. - For he bringeth down them that dwell on high; the lofty city, he layeth it low; he layeth it low, even to the ground; he bringeth it even to the dust. Isaiah 26., 5.

  • Ninth Ten - Text 9
  • Question 2. - After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me. 1 Corinthians 11., 25.
  • Question 13. - When ye come together therefore into one place, this is not to eat the Lord's supper.
    1 Corinthians 11., 20.
  • Question 18. - And thou shalt shew thy son in that day, saying, This is done because of that which the LORD did unto me when I came forth out of Egypt. Exodus 13., 8.

  • Ninth Ten - Text 10
  • Question 5. - I thank my God, I speak with tongues more than ye all: 1 Corithians 14., 18.
  • Question 8. - And the spirits of the prophets are subject to the prophets. 1 Corithians 14., 32.
  • Question 18. - But if all prophesy, and there come in one that believeth not, or one unlearned, he is convinced of all, he is judged of all: 1 Corithians 14., 24.
  • Question 26. - Wherefore tongues are for a sign, not to them that believe, but to them that believe not: but prophesying serveth not for them that believe not, but for them which believe. 1 Corithians 14., 22.
  • Question 28. - Wherefore tongues are for a sign, not to them that believe, but to them that believe not: but prophesying serveth not for them that believe not, but for them which believe. 1 Corithians 14., 22.
  • Question 30. - 39. Wherefore, brethren, covet to prophesy, and forbid not to speak with tongues. 40. Let all things be done decently and in order. 1 Corithians 14., 39, 40.
  • Question 31. - Else when thou shalt bless with the spirit, how shall he that occupieth the room of the unlearned say Amen at thy giving of thanks, seeing he understandeth not what thou sayest? 1 Corithians 14., 16.
  • Question 38. - Else when thou shalt bless with the spirit, how shall he that occupieth the room of the unlearned say Amen at thy giving of thanks, seeing he understandeth not what thou sayest? 1 Corithians 14., 16.
  • Question 39. - 15. What is it then? I will pray with the spirit, and I will pray with the understanding also: I will sing with the spirit, and I will sing with the understanding also. 24. But if all prophesy, and there come in one that believeth not, or one unlearned, he is convinced of all, he is judged of all: 1 Corithians 14., 15, 24.

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